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34 minutes ago, Gonzo said:

The corrupt Coates has spoken, dead may pile up on the streets, but the Olympics will go ahead

What an idiotic comment.

Do you really think that will happen on the streets of Japan? 

Serioudly mate, get a grip on reality.

Your comment is off-the-chart ridiculous.

 

 

 

 

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Understand something about that though.. The Summer Olympics are a once every 4 years event.  That means at most only 25 countries can host an Olympics in an entire century, and that's if there a

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As I've said elsewhere the recent number of new daily cases in Japan is roughly the same as here in Pennsylvania, and we have  a tenth of the population of Japan. I would love to have Japan's percenta

I don't think Japan will host the Olympics (neithe summer nor winter) anytime soon after this mess. Public opinion will remain very negative for many years ahead and I don't see any bid from Japan to host for at least a couple of decades to soar on. This whole thing reeks heavily on greed and desperation from organizations to get their share of money. I was hoping Tokyo 2020 could patch things up after a messy decade for Olympism but seems like it will be the opossite. And then there is Beijing 2022 right on the corner with a host threatening to "punish the world" if we don't go to their birthday party.

I'm already focusing in Paris, Cortina and LA in all honesty. That is if this virus is finally under control by then.

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2 hours ago, Ikarus360 said:

I don't think Japan will host the Olympics (neithe summer nor winter) anytime soon after this mess. Public opinion will remain very negative for many years ahead and I don't see any bid from Japan to host for at least a couple of decades to soar on. This whole thing reeks heavily on greed and desperation from organizations to get their share of money. I was hoping Tokyo 2020 could patch things up after a messy decade for Olympism but seems like it will be the opossite. And then there is Beijing 2022 right on the corner with a host threatening to "punish the world" if we don't go to their birthday party.

I'm already focusing in Paris, Cortina and LA in all honesty. That is if this virus is finally under control by then.

It's a shame for the IOC since it means they lose a viable Winter host in Sapporo.  Who knows when we might see them again.

This all is a shame for Tokyo because they could have put on a wonderful Olympics, but thanks to the pandemic, history will probably view these Olympics in a fairly negative light through no fault of Japan.  And then maybe 40 of 50 years from now, they'll get another shot to do it right, but hard to envision that at this point.

Part of the draw of the Olympics for me is the build-up and anticipation.  Would think having 2 Olympics in close proximity to each other would be great, but I'm with you.. in many ways, I just want to move on to Paris and hope for the best there.  I trust that once the Olympics start, I can focus on that rather than all the background noise and negative press that always accompanies a lead-up to the Olympics.  But I'm fairly certain all that background noise will infiltrate the games ans as much as I can probably tune it out, it's going to give the event a bad name and reputation and a lot of people will likely sour on it.  Which is a darn shame as an American because this is the first Summer Olympics since LA was awarded 2028, so it would be nice to start that build-up, but that's unlikely to happen now

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Too bad that the new stadia may not see grand debuts and use.  As for the Village, well, the would-have been owners have already been inconvenienced for a year, so I bet they are just as eager to take possession of their units BEFORE any athletes have defaced and messed up their units.  

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On 5/9/2021 at 8:56 PM, Ikarus360 said:

I don't think Japan will host the Olympics (neithe summer nor winter) anytime soon after this mess. Public opinion will remain very negative for many years ahead and I don't see any bid from Japan to host for at least a couple of decades to soar on. This whole thing reeks heavily on greed and desperation from organizations to get their share of money. I was hoping Tokyo 2020 could patch things up after a messy decade for Olympism but seems like it will be the opossite. And then there is Beijing 2022 right on the corner with a host threatening to "punish the world" if we don't go to their birthday party.

I'm already focusing in Paris, Cortina and LA in all honesty. That is if this virus is finally under control by then.

Japan has been long-dreamed of becoming an Olympic host for the first time since 1964, but with that virus being originated in Wuhan, in my theory, it seems China had attempted not only to divide the world, but to ultimately disrupt Tokyo's Games in order for Beijing to prioritize the Winter Games in 2022. Once more, COVID-19 had ruined Japan's Olympic dreams that began in the Buenos Aires announcement in 2013, since they are still reeling from the catastrophic events of 11 March 2011.

This is why the IOC should be more careful on choosing host cities, or the reputation of the Games would be in peril. Again, they should need more reforms on picking cities while reducing and maintaining costs, not by the way of greed. If you see Brisbane being picked as the 'preferred bidder' for the 2032 Olympics, it's not transparent, so the bidding format should revert back to the way it was before the Monte Carlo IOC session, but in a modified way, a bidder would not only apply to a single city, but an entire state or province, and being taken place nationwide or co-hosting with an another country would also help. 

There are three scenarios that Japan should pick as a concept for their possible bid for a future Olympics:

1. What if Japan staged the Games in an entire prefecture or region? The Philippines used that concept when the country hosted the 2019 SEA Games, with the opening ceremony being taken place in the 55,000-seater Philippine Arena in Bulacan, while the athletics competitions being held in the New Clark City Sports Hub, in Tarlac. Both Bulacan and Tarlac are in the island of Luzon, and is located north, and bordered with Metro Manila. In this case, Japan should pick either Tokyo or Yokohama for the athletics events, since both stadiums had the capacity that exceeded more than 60,000+ seats, while the volleyball tournament would likely be moved to Nagoya, as the city will host the 2026 Asian Games.

2. When it comes to existing venues, that would be an Olympics being taken place nationwide or selected cities, and this concept is based on the host city format of the FIFA World Cup. It would also be okay for them to use the same venues that will be used for 2020, but in addition, some sports and events would likely be moved away somewhere else from Tokyo, and that would depend on a city's experiences of hosting international competition. For example, aquatics would be moved to Fukuoka, since the city will stage the 2022 World Aquatics Championships, handball would be held in Kumamoto, which had hosted both the Handball Men's World Championship in 1997, and the Women's World Championship in 2019, while the Olympic marathon would have to choose to either stay in Sapporo; just as in 2020, or to be held in either Tokyo or Osaka.

3. This scenario would likely boost chances and hopes for reconciliation, because here's a question, what if Japan would join North and South Korea to bid for the 2032 Olympics, or further Games? Japan and the Korean Peninsula are both in conflict for a long time, and if the Olympics celebrate peace and Tokyo 2020 being branded itself as the "Games of Recovery", why not 'reconciliation' be used as its theme? Here's an example of this unifying concept, both ceremonies would be held solely in separate stadiums, in which either Seoul or Pyongyang would host the opener, while either Tokyo or Yokohama would be the site of the closing ceremony. Some sports and events would be moved somewhere else in either both countries, but in significance of two countries sharing the honor of hosting the Games, athletics competitions would be held in both of the two hosts, with Korea staging the track events, while Japan would host the field events.

All of these would be helpful for Japan, but this is unless they would never repeat the same mistakes and mishaps just as in the lead-up to the 2020 Games, which was rescheduled to this year as a result of this pandemic. Also, if you look at a possible Vancouver 2030 bid, using finances from private sectors in order to invest the Games would be helpful too.

This is one valuable lesson that Japan should learn: Don't look down, and never look back to your bumpy and scandalous past; in a way of greed, but the best for all of you, is to sight further to a better and bright future; in a way of working or collaborating together.

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2 hours ago, @SportNow786542 said:

Japan has been long-dreamed of becoming an Olympic host for the first time since 1964, but with that virus being originated in Wuhan, in my theory, it seems China had attempted not only to divide the world, but to ultimately disrupt Tokyo's Games in order for Beijing to prioritize the Winter Games in 2022. Once more, COVID-19 had ruined Japan's Olympic dreams that began in the Buenos Aires announcement in 2013, since they are still reeling from the catastrophic events of 11 March 2011.

This is why the IOC should be more careful on choosing host cities, or the reputation of the Games would be in peril. Again, they should need more reforms on picking cities while reducing and maintaining costs, not by the way of greed. If you see Brisbane being picked as the 'preferred bidder' for the 2032 Olympics, it's not transparent, so the bidding format should revert back to the way it was before the Monte Carlo IOC session, but in a modified way, a bidder would not only apply to a single city, but an entire state or province, and being taken place nationwide or co-hosting with an another country would also help. 

All of these would be helpful for Japan, but this is unless they would never repeat the same mistakes and mishaps just as in the lead-up to the 2020 Games, which was rescheduled to this year as a result of this pandemic. Also, if you look at a possible Vancouver 2030 bid, using finances from private sectors in order to invest the Games would be helpful too.

This is one valuable lesson that Japan should learn: Don't look down, and never look back to your bumpy and scandalous past; in a way of greed, but the best for all of you, is to sight further to a better and bright future; in a way of working or collaborating together.

Are you seriously suggesting that COVID not only was intentionally released into the world (you're not the first person to suggest that), but that China did it in hopes of screwing over Japan in hopes it would help their Olympic aspirations?  Not sure I can express just how batshit crazy that idea is if that's what you're suggesting.

Yes, this all is extremely unfortunate for Japan their Olympics will now be anything but a joyous celebration.  It's a separate conversation about the IOC and future Olympic hosts, although 1 thing you can be sure of is that Japan won't be in the running to be one of those hosts probably for a long long time.  And at the very least, the priority is getting through these Olympics rather than trying to figure out how to do 1 in a future.

1 thing to note.. you talk about a future host being more of a region or even more of a full country rather than just a single city.  That's already happening.  Look no further than the 2026 Winter bids.  2032 with Brisbane seems like it may fit that mold as well.  Any country or city/region at this point is welcome to present a plan such at that.  But they need to offer up to the IOC why it makes sense and why they should be the "preferred bidder" as the story goes now

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6 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

1 thing to note.. you talk about a future host being more of a region or even more of a full country rather than just a single city.  That's already happening.  Look no further than the 2026 Winter bids.  2032 with Brisbane seems like it may fit that mold as well.  Any country or city/region at this point is welcome to present a plan such at that.  But they need to offer up to the IOC why it makes sense and why they should be the "preferred bidder" as the story goes now

Holding the Games in an entire country would also be a great idea especially for smaller nations, and would you imagine small countries like Qatar or even Switzerland (Home of the IOC) would host the Summer Olympics? That exception would be the city-state of Singapore, unless they would have to collaborate with Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia for a possible co-hosting bid.

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https://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1107813/sailing-ioc-tokyo-2020

This could be nothing but it's interesting the IOC has yet to respond to World Sailing's request for confirmation that the Tokyo Olympics will go ahead. Seems like with all the spin from Bach and Coates the IOC would've jumped on this. 

The financial wreckage surrounding Tokyo is getting clearer by the day. A study from Oxford University now pegs the Tokyo Olympics as surpassing Sochi as the most expensive Olympics in history. Of course the IOC will spin it with an asterisk blaming Covid-19 for everything despite the fact the costs were getting well out of control before the pandemic. Politically, Suga knows for his Liberal Democrat party to have any chance in the upcoming elections, they need an Olympics that will make the public forget the financial costs. Coates has been spinning this for a while paying no heed to the increasing opposition. 

I do find it interesting that Suga postponed a snap election until after the Olympics, probably to ward off the possibility of a landslide defeat leading to a new prime minister to cancelling the games. Just a few weeks ago, the Liberal Democratic Party lost three key seats in parliamentary by-elections, a likely sign of things to come. There's really no good solution here. Vaccines? It's a start but the logistics of vaccinating all the athletes before the Olympics is a logistical challenge. It also creates a PR headache for the IOC now that athletes are jumping the line in countries that are struggling to vaccinate their own populations.

https://www.scmp.com/sport/other-sport/article/3133377/why-tokyo-thinks-2020-olympics-show-must-go-even-covid-19-booms

Interesting note from the article above. A cancellation would mean the IOC would owe huge sums of money to the likes of NBC since the IOC gets most of its income from broadcasting rights, money they don't have. Does the IOC have an insurance policy on this? I would imagine in the event of a cancellation, NBC would want some form of compensation if not all their money. Could this lead to a messy court battle?

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2 hours ago, stryker said:

https://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1107813/sailing-ioc-tokyo-2020

This could be nothing but it's interesting the IOC has yet to respond to World Sailing's request for confirmation that the Tokyo Olympics will go ahead. Seems like with all the spin from Bach and Coates the IOC would've jumped on this. 

The financial wreckage surrounding Tokyo is getting clearer by the day. A study from Oxford University now pegs the Tokyo Olympics as surpassing Sochi as the most expensive Olympics in history. Of course the IOC will spin it with an asterisk blaming Covid-19 for everything despite the fact the costs were getting well out of control before the pandemic. Politically, Suga knows for his Liberal Democrat party to have any chance in the upcoming elections, they need an Olympics that will make the public forget the financial costs. Coates has been spinning this for a while paying no heed to the increasing opposition. 

I do find it interesting that Suga postponed a snap election until after the Olympics, probably to ward off the possibility of a landslide defeat leading to a new prime minister to cancelling the games. Just a few weeks ago, the Liberal Democratic Party lost three key seats in parliamentary by-elections, a likely sign of things to come. There's really no good solution here. Vaccines? It's a start but the logistics of vaccinating all the athletes before the Olympics is a logistical challenge. It also creates a PR headache for the IOC now that athletes are jumping the line in countries that are struggling to vaccinate their own populations.

https://www.scmp.com/sport/other-sport/article/3133377/why-tokyo-thinks-2020-olympics-show-must-go-even-covid-19-booms

Interesting note from the article above. A cancellation would mean the IOC would owe huge sums of money to the likes of NBC since the IOC gets most of its income from broadcasting rights, money they don't have. Does the IOC have an insurance policy on this? I would imagine in the event of a cancellation, NBC would want some form of compensation if not all their money. Could this lead to a messy court battle?

When the United States pulled out of the 1980 Olympics, NBC (in what was supposed to be their first major effort at covering an Olympics) had insurance to cover most of the rights fees.  The only money they didn't get back was the production costs they had already spent.

Have to imagine that NBC is covered in the event of a cancellation, so they likely wouldn't owe money to the IOC that they were supposed to pay in rights fees.  

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IOC says ready to send extra medical staff to Tokyo Olympics

International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach said Wednesday his organization is prepared to send medical staff to the Tokyo Olympics as part of efforts to deal with the coronavirus pandemic.

Speaking at the outset of a three-day virtual meeting between Japan and the IOC's Coordination Commission, Bach said, "The IOC has offered to the organizing committee to have additional medical personnel...to support the medical operations and the strict implementation of COVID-19 countermeasures."

Addressing representatives of the Japanese organizing committee and the Japanese government, Bach said he expects over 80 percent of the residents of the athletes' village during the Olympics and Paralympics will be vaccinated for the virus.

"We must concentrate on delivery of these safe and secure Olympic Games because the opening ceremony is only 65 days away," he said.

The offer came amid growing public concern in Japan that hosting the global sporting event this summer could put further strains on the country's medical system.

The remote meeting through Friday is the 11th and final meeting between Japan and the IOC commission, which oversees preparation for the games, before the Olympics begin on July 23.

While the Tokyo Games approach following an unprecedented one-year delay, the majority of Japanese people are against holding the Olympics this summer, as the country grapples with infections and vaccine rollout remains slow.

Tokyo and some other areas are currently under a COVID-19 state of emergency, during which people are asked not to make unnecessary outings and establishments such as those serving alcohol to close.

Date:May 19, 2021

News source:The Mainichi

Link to this article:https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20210519/p2g/00m/0sp/069000c

 

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On 5/20/2021 at 3:18 PM, Victorian said:

Will the Olympics go ahead?

Yes it will. Things must go on. Tokyo metropolis and Japanese government wants to finish their jobs as quickly as possible.

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Host City Contract

“Nowhere within the 81-page contract does the host city or national government have the right to cancel the biggest event in the world.”

“Two key paragraphs in the Olympic contract give the International Olympic Committee extraordinary power over a sovereign government.”

“They can be found on page 72 and 73 under the subheading “termination”.

“The city of Tokyo does not have any power to decide whether or not the Olympic Games will be held,” said Yoshihisa Hayakawa, a professor of law at Rikkyo University, who also practises with law firm Uryu & Itoga in international commercial arbitration.

“This is the exclusive power of the IOC. The city of Tokyo is an entity that provides venues.”

The same contract has been in place for decades. It will be again in Paris in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028.

Eryk Bagshaw
By Eryk Bagshaw
May 22, 2021

Credit: The Age - click here to read more

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5 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

 

Host City Contract

“Nowhere within the 81-page contract does the host city or national government have the right to cancel the biggest event in the world.”

“Two key paragraphs in the Olympic contract give the International Olympic Committee extraordinary power over a sovereign government.”

“They can be found on page 72 and 73 under the subheading “termination”.

“The city of Tokyo does not have any power to decide whether or not the Olympic Games will be held,” said Yoshihisa Hayakawa, a professor of law at Rikkyo University, who also practises with law firm Uryu & Itoga in international commercial arbitration.

“This is the exclusive power of the IOC. The city of Tokyo is an entity that provides venues.”

The same contract has been in place for decades. It will be again in Paris in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028.

Eryk Bagshaw
By Eryk Bagshaw
May 22, 2021

Credit: The Age - click here to read more

So what would the IOC's recourse be if Tokyo pulled the plug? The IOC is a nonprofit organization with no political power. What are they going to do? File a lawsuit against Tokyo or the Japanese government? Laughable, not to mention the fact with the IOC's reputation not in the best of shape, an attempt to take legal action especially when a cancellation would be to protect public health, would backfire horribly on the IOC in terms of public relations.

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28 minutes ago, stryker said:

So what would the IOC's recourse be if Tokyo pulled the plug? The IOC is a nonprofit organization with no political power. What are they going to do? File a lawsuit against Tokyo or the Japanese government? Laughable, not to mention the fact with the IOC's reputation not in the best of shape, an attempt to take legal action especially when a cancellation would be to protect public health, would backfire horribly on the IOC in terms of public relations.

In the end, a sovereign national government will do what it wants in the national interest.  

The 1916 Berlin Summer Olympics were cancelled due to World War 1.  Then the 1940 Helsinki Winter Olympics were cancelled in 1939 due to Hitler’s invasion of Poland. The 1944 Cortina d’Ampezzo Winter Olympics were also cancelled, as was 1944 London Summer Olympics following their rescheduling from 1940.

In all these cancellations, it would have been the national governments who did the cancelling. The IOC would have, of course agreed, with all of these cancellations and actively participated in rescheduling the 1940 London Games to 1944.

However, it appears that if the rescheduled Tokyo Games are cancelled, and I don’t believe they will be, then it’s likely it won’t be the City of Tokyo cancelling them but the Japanese Government.

Untested yet historically, but I cannot yet imagine a scenario when the IOC would even want to take action against an Organising Committee when that Host City’s  National Government has cancelled the Olympic Games in the national interest.

 No Olympic Games before Tokyo 2021 have had to deal with a raging worldwide pandemic.   The IOC and the Tokyo Organising Committee believe they have found a way for the Games to go ahead safely.

 

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Gov't, organizers inclining to allow spectators at Tokyo Games

More Japanese government officials and Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics organizers are inclined to allow a certain number of spectators at this summer's games if thorough anti-coronavirus measures are taken, sources close to the matter said Saturday.

The sources' remarks come just two months before the opening of the Olympics on July 23, and despite growing public calls for canceling the events due to skepticism about the ability of the organizers to contain the spread of the virus.

The Japanese capital has been under a state of emergency since late April amid a fourth wave of infections.

The organizers are scheduled to decide next month on the number of spectators by considering the infection situation and other factors.

There are concerns that allowing spectators will increase foot traffic outside venues, meaning additional countermeasures will be required.

The sources also said the no-spectator option will likely be maintained until the last minute should there be a rapid deterioration of the infection situation.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga favors having spectators, with a source close to his office confirming that measures are being considered to allow fans in the stands.

When declaring the ongoing state of emergency in late April, the government set a basic policy of not allowing spectators at major events in affected areas.

That was relaxed when the state of emergency was extended on May 7, with attendance to be capped at 5,000 people or 50 percent of venue capacity.

Adding to the push to have spectators is the track record of pro baseball and pro soccer in admitting fans without significant trouble, and the need, demonstrated in Olympic test events, for fans in the stands.

"The discussion about having no spectators is over, and now the main avenue of consideration is how many we can allow in," said an official who has a central role in preparing the games.

However, if the number of spectators is to be limited, a lottery to select from among ticket holders will be necessary. The preparations needed for such a step mean there is not much time left before it needs to begin.

There are also opinions that "the games should go ahead without spectators to ease the burden on operations, and concentrate on infection countermeasures for athletes and stakeholders."

Issues surrounding the effect of hot weather on spectators are also among those that remain unresolved.

In March, the government and organizers decided to prohibit non-resident spectators. A decision on limiting domestic fans was to be made in April, but that has now been put off until June due to surges in the numbers of infections.

Date: May 21,2021

News source: Kyodo News

Link to this article: https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2021/05/4030d28297c8-govt-organizers-inclining-to-allow-spectators-at-tokyo-games.html

 

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5 hours ago, Rob. said:

The IOC has never been shy of shoving its foot in its mouth, and these are a couple of doozies...

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2021/may/24/tokyo-olympics-anger-japan-ioc-coronavirus-sacrifices

Bach and Coates contriving to turn a delicate situation into an international incident. :rolleyes:

“We are in no mood to celebrate an event filled with fear and anxiety,”

Is it morally acceptable for the world to impose on Japan to host the Games when 80%of the Japanese are not in the mood to host it anymore?

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8 hours ago, Rob. said:

The IOC has never been shy of shoving its foot in its mouth, and these are a couple of doozies...

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2021/may/24/tokyo-olympics-anger-japan-ioc-coronavirus-sacrifices

Bach and Coates contriving to turn a delicate situation into an international incident. :rolleyes:

Gee, allow me to feign my shock and dismay that Coates and Bach would say something that is completely tone deaf that would spark outrage.

The more those 2 can stay out of sight and mind over the next 10 months, the better.  I could only imagine how ugly it would all get if they had to spend more time focusing on China.  In that regard, the best thing that could have happened was for Tokyo to get postponed and for all the discussion to be on them to the point that many people probably forget there's another Olympics less than 6 months following the end of Tokyo.

2 hours ago, kevzz said:

“We are in no mood to celebrate an event filled with fear and anxiety,”

Is it morally acceptable for the world to impose on Japan to host the Games when 80%of the Japanese are not in the mood to host it anymore?

It's a valid question, but here's the other side of that equation.. Japan accepted the responsibility of hosting the Olympic Games and then said they could do so following a 12 month postponement.  What is their obligation to deliver on that promise as opposed to backing out because they're no longer in the mood?

It goes without saying a pandemic is different than the struggles other host cities have faced.  I understand the fear and anxiety, but how many sporting events have been held all over the world with little contribution to additional COVID cases and deaths?  Way too many people are convinced the Olympics will be a super-spreader event.  They don't have to be if run properly.  Not the IOC's fault that the virus is surging in Japan and a relatively about of COVID per capita compared to many other countries has overwhelmed their healthcare infrastructure.

I don't want to seem like a heartless individual who wants to put my desire to see the Olympics ahead of the lives of others.  But again, I will continue to ask the question of why Japan has found themselves in this position when for a long time, they seemed to have better control over the virus than most countries.

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Yes, not the IOC's fault. But when you have a healthcare system that is already overwhelmed, it's not a great idea to put tens of thousands of foreign visitors into the system and just hope they won't need to use it while a pandemic is raging and there are anyway drug tests and inevitably injuries that need to be taken care of.

There are now only two months left - in some countries vaccination campaigns are really taking up speed, in many others they don't. And especially in those countries, is it really morally acceptable that athletes get priority if even health care workers or risk groups don't have a chance yet to get a jab, just because the IOC and a PM hoping for re-election want to put on a show? (Side note: We could have a debate on fairness of global vaccines distribution and patenting, but that's another, albeit related, story)

If I were a Japanese citizen, I would surely be among the 80%.

And even if all goes well and it's not turning into a super-spreader event (which we will anyway only know a few weeks later really), the disregard for the population of a host nation is absolutely alarming and the IOC can only afford this because they already have logged in almost everything for more than the next decade.

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34 minutes ago, Quaker2001 said:

Gee, allow me to feign my shock and dismay that Coates and Bach would say something that is completely tone deaf that would spark outrage.

The more those 2 can stay out of sight and mind over the next 10 months, the better.  I could only imagine how ugly it would all get if they had to spend more time focusing on China.  In that regard, the best thing that could have happened was for Tokyo to get postponed and for all the discussion to be on them to the point that many people probably forget there's another Olympics less than 6 months following the end of Tokyo.

It's a valid question, but here's the other side of that equation.. Japan accepted the responsibility of hosting the Olympic Games and then said they could do so following a 12 month postponement.  What is their obligation to deliver on that promise as opposed to backing out because they're no longer in the mood?

It goes without saying a pandemic is different than the struggles other host cities have faced.  I understand the fear and anxiety, but how many sporting events have been held all over the world with little contribution to additional COVID cases and deaths?  Way too many people are convinced the Olympics will be a super-spreader event.  They don't have to be if run properly.  Not the IOC's fault that the virus is surging in Japan and a relatively about of COVID per capita compared to many other countries has overwhelmed their healthcare infrastructure.

I don't want to seem like a heartless individual who wants to put my desire to see the Olympics ahead of the lives of others.  But again, I will continue to ask the question of why Japan has found themselves in this position when for a long time, they seemed to have better control over the virus than most countries.

Bach and Coates have been as caustic as battery acid to the Olympics over the past few years. They are clearly spinning the situation and will probably pretend after the Tokyo Olympics end that these games were an anomaly to attempt to blunt any more No-Olympics talk from future bidders. 

I honestly think the organizers thought when the postponement was announced the world would be well on its way to the end of the pandemic was mass vaccination programs all over the globe. It hasn't happened that way and the pandemic is likely going to last well into 2022-2023 based on current vaccination rates. These are already the most expensive Olympics in history surpassing Sochi and they might also set the record for the biggest financial loss, something I am sure Bach and Coates will move to spin as an anomaly (never mind the fact the actual costs of Rio are said to be much higher than initially reported) I also think the Olympics can be done safely if done properly, but I'm not sure the IOC really has done their due diligence on this. Not having quarantine for unvaccinated athletes or personnel is the first red flag. When looking at test events or single tournaments like the Australian Open or the NBA last year, you have far fewer athletes that you can keep in a bubble type scenario. I don't remember the article (maybe insidethegames) but a suggestion last year was made to basically spread the Olympics out all over Japan in multiple bubbles with athletes and staff in designated hotels complete with quarantine on arrival and the athletes would only be allowed to leave the hotel for training or competing. When their event concluded they would have to depart within 24 hours. This also assumed no spectators or ceremonies. Under current protocols, it's hard to see how 10,000+ athletes and personnel in the Olympic Village with multiple sites across Tokyo could be considered a bubble not to mention no quarantine for unvaccinated athletes or personnel. I wonder if the stink that some tennis players made about Australia's quarantine rules during the Australian Open may have played a part in no quarantine in Tokyo.

 

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I also wonder how many athletes are actually training for the Games, qualified and eventually attend the Games?
 

Does IOC expect a much lower number of athletes taking part compared to normal (10K+ if not wrong)? For countries devastated by the pandemic, particularly the developing countries, I wouldn’t be surprised if a lot of their athletes stopped training since last year due to various lockdown and resources available to them  

 

 

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Mixed-gender Olympic Oath takers being considered for Tokyo Games

Organizers are considering having one female and one male athlete swear the Olympic Oath at the upcoming Tokyo Games opening ceremony, a source familiar with the matter said Wednesday.

Traditionally, one athlete from the host nation recites the oath on behalf of all games participants but having a mixed-gender pair carry out the rite on July 23 would be a nod to gender balance and equality recommendations set out in Olympic Agenda 2020.

At the Seoul Olympics in 1988, female handball player Son Mi Na and male basketball player Hur Jae delivered the athletes' oath together in the only previous occasion where more than one person has given the Olympic pledge of sportsmanship.

The International Olympic Committee has called the Tokyo Olympics "the first-ever gender-balanced Olympic Games in history," with almost 49 percent of the athletes participating being women and a record number of female competitors at the Paralympics.

The idea is being considered just months after the long-time organizing committee chief Yoshiro Mori stepped down amid an uproar over sexist comments he made regarding women's input in meetings.

The 83-year-old retracted the remarks and offered an apology "to anyone I have offended" but blamed the media for fanning public anger.

The IOC has encouraged National Olympic Committees to take up the option to have both a female and male flagbearer, and also decided that each of the 206 delegations should include at least one male and one female.

In addition to the delegation captain, the Japanese Olympic Committee is planning to add a vice-captain for the first time at a Summer Games. The team will ensure each role is held by an athlete of a different gender.

All three oath takers at past Olympics held in Japan have been male.

Gymnast Takashi Ono took the Olympic Oath in 1964 when Tokyo last hosted the Summer Games. Speed skater Keiichi Suzuki took the oath at the 1972 Sapporo Winter Games and Nordic combined skier Kenji Ogiwara did so at the 1998 Nagano Winter Games.

Date:May 26,2021

News source:Kyodo News

Link to this article:https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2021/05/e4414fde6852-mixed-gender-olympic-oath-takers-being-considered-for-tokyo-games.html

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