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Since the "Brazilians: topic was closed before I could comment, I was going to say that assessing 2016 is between vuvuzuelas and boos, I'd take the boos (which should have its limits).  But what I wil

As I've said elsewhere the recent number of new daily cases in Japan is roughly the same as here in Pennsylvania, and we have  a tenth of the population of Japan. I would love to have Japan's percenta

Are you seriously suggesting that COVID not only was intentionally released into the world (you're not the first person to suggest that), but that China did it in hopes of screwing over Japan in hopes

1 hour ago, Rob. said:

Behind a paywall but huge news if true...

 

Curious this comes out shortly after Bach comes out and says he's confident they'll happen on time.

3 minutes ago, BTHarner said:

Probably the only realistic scenario. The IOC should offer them the opportunity to host in 2032.

Does Tokyo really want to stay in bed with the IOC for that long?  If that happens, it'll have been nearly 20 years!  How much more will that cost Japan to stage the 2032 Olympics, especially with facilities that will all be a lot older, and who knows what they'll be able to do about the athletes village.

I want to remain optimistic we'll have an Olympics this summer and the IOC being the IOC, I wonder how much they'll hold Japan's feet to the fire to hold the games.

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27 minutes ago, Quaker2001 said:

Curious this comes out shortly after Bach comes out and says he's confident they'll happen on time.

Does Tokyo really want to stay in bed with the IOC for that long?  If that happens, it'll have been nearly 20 years!  How much more will that cost Japan to stage the 2032 Olympics, especially with facilities that will all be a lot older, and who knows what they'll be able to do about the athletes village.

I want to remain optimistic we'll have an Olympics this summer and the IOC being the IOC, I wonder how much they'll hold Japan's feet to the fire to hold the games.

They're talking about a Sapporo bid for the winter games, so they might be in bed with the IOC regardless. 

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3 minutes ago, BTHarner said:

They're talking about a Sapporo bid for the winter games, so they might be in bed with the IOC regardless. 

Maybe the solution is the IOC gives them Sapporo without a contest.  But I don't know that changing Tokyo 2020 to Tokyo 2032 is going to work out so well

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On 1/20/2021 at 2:51 AM, ulu said:

The problem is that even if they manage to vaccinate 100% of the Japanese population, the athletes and various workers will still spread the virus among themselves and take various viral strains back to their home countries. 

1 hour ago, Quaker2001 said:

Maybe the solution is the IOC gives them Sapporo without a contest.  But I don't know that changing Tokyo 2020 to Tokyo 2032 is going to work out so well

I just don't see how they can keep temporary venues and facilities dormant for 20 years. Do they rent out the Olympic village and then kick the thousands of residents out for the 2032 games? Do they leave the buildings empty for that long? Or will they sell off the condos and build a second Olympic village for 2032?

At this point they should simply cut their losses. I wonder if the Japanese government has been caught in a sunk cost fallacy, feeling they have to continue the games somehow just to justify the money they have already spent.

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3 hours ago, Nacre said:

I just don't see how they can keep temporary venues and facilities dormant for 20 years. Do they rent out the Olympic village and then kick the thousands of residents out for the 2032 games? Do they leave the buildings empty for that long? Or will they sell off the condos and build a second Olympic village for 2032?

At this point they should simply cut their losses. I wonder if the Japanese government has been caught in a sunk cost fallacy, feeling they have to continue the games somehow just to justify the money they have already spent.

They said they didn't have a Plan B last time.  Then came up with a Plan B very quickly.  No idea what they would do if they decide they can't hold the Games this summer.  But if that decision has to be made, it won't be made for at least until the spring.  There was no way they could have gone ahead with the Olympics last year.  But now, sports teams and leagues are managing to operate.  Obviously the Olympics is an event like nothing else, but to say it's not possible.. way too early for that kind of declaration.

You say they should cut their losses, but this isn't the best example of a sunk cost fallacy.  Cancelling now means all the money they have spent, including this extra year due to the postponement went for nothing.  They only get to reap the rewards when the event goes on.  Might not be so helpful to the Japanese government if they have to hold the event without spectators, but the IOC and all the sports federations would be in bad shape if they didn't get their influx of cash because the Olympics didn't go on.  That Japan is pushing forward isn't simply to justify what they've spent, but to see a return on their investment which right now they don't really have.

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Japan denies report it plans Tokyo Olympics cancellation

Japan stood firm on Friday on its commitment to host the Tokyo Olympics this year and denied reports of a possible cancellation but the pledge looks unlikely to ease public concern about holding the event during a global pandemic.

Though much of Japan is under a state of emergency due to a third wave of COVID-19 infections, Tokyo Olympic organisers have vowed to press ahead with the re-scheduled Games, which are due to open on July 23 after being postponed for a year because of the coronavirus.

A government spokesman said there was "no truth" to a report in the Times newspaper that the government had privately concluded the Games would have to be cancelled because of the virus.

The Times, citing an unidentified senior member of the ruling coalition, said the government's focus was now on securing the Games for Tokyo in the next available year, 2032.

"We will clearly deny the report," Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Manabu Sakai told a news conference.

The governor of Tokyo, Yuriko Koike, said there had been no talk of cancelling or delaying the Olympics and a protest should be lodged over the Times report.

The Games organising committee also denied the report, saying in a statement its partners including the government and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) were "fully focused" on hosting the games as scheduled.

"It is very disappointing to see that the Times is developing such a tabloid-like story with an untrustworthy source," a source from the organising committee told Reuters.

"The national government is fully committed to delivering a safe and secure Games, and we are always encouraged by their dedications," the source said.

The Australian and U.S. Olympic Committees said they were preparing for the Games as planned.

"Unfortunately, I need to address unfounded rumours that the Tokyo Olympic Games will be cancelled, rumours that only create more anxiety for athletes," Matt Carroll, the chief executive of the Australian committee, told reporters in Sydney.

"The Tokyo Games are on. The flame will be lit on July 23, 2021."

The Australian committee is run by the IOC's pointman for the Tokyo Games, John Coates.

The U.S. and Canadian committees wrote on Twitter they had not received any information suggesting the Games would not happen as planned.

Japan has been hit less severely by the pandemic than many other advanced economies but a recent surge in cases has forced it to close its borders to non-resident foreigners and declare a state of emergency in the Tokyo and other cities.

Tokyo reported new daily coronavirus cases of more than 1,000 for nine straight days through Thursday and set a single-day record of more than 2,400 infections earlier this month. The death toll from the respiratory disease stands at nearly 4,900 people in Japan.

There are public fears that an influx of athletes will spread the virus. About 80% of people in Japan do not want the Games to be held this summer, recent opinion polls show.

In an interview ahead of Friday's report, Tokyo 2020 CEO Toshiro Muto said he was cautiously hopeful that successful COVID-19 vaccine campaigns could help ensure the safe staging of the world's largest sporting event.

The Olympic Games represents a major milestone for Japan and its premier, Yoshihide Suga, who has said the event would bring "hope and courage" to the world. Suga reiterated on Friday the Games would go ahead as planned.

IOC President Thomas Bach reaffirmed his commitment to holding the Games this year in an interview with Kyodo News on Thursday.

"We have at this moment, no reason whatsoever to believe that the Olympic Games in Tokyo will not open on the 23rd of July in the Olympic stadium in Tokyo," Bach said.

Date:January 22,2021

News source:Nikkei Asia

Link to this article:https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Coronavirus/Japan-denies-report-it-plans-Tokyo-Olympics-cancellation

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13 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

You say they should cut their losses, but this isn't the best example of a sunk cost fallacy.  Cancelling now means all the money they have spent, including this extra year due to the postponement went for nothing.  They only get to reap the rewards when the event goes on.  Might not be so helpful to the Japanese government if they have to hold the event without spectators, but the IOC and all the sports federations would be in bad shape if they didn't get their influx of cash because the Olympics didn't go on.  That Japan is pushing forward isn't simply to justify what they've spent, but to see a return on their investment which right now they don't really have.

The event itself usually barely breaks even in developed countries. But that's with stadiums and arenas full of fans when people can afford to buy expensive tickets, and companies are flush with cash for advertising. With stadiums one third of capacity with only Japanese fans, they will probably lose even more money by going forward with the games.

That the IOC is desperate for the Olympics to go forward so they can get their cut of the broadcasting cash is certainly true. And I wonder if they will sue the Japanese government for damages if Tokyo bails on them.

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6 hours ago, rio2016man said:

Most likely they're going to take a page out of NBA and NHL's play book and do bubbles

 

The NBA bubble cost more than $600,000 per athlete.

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Coates insists no discussion of postponing or cancelling Tokyo Games

Credit:  Brisbane Times

by Chris Barrett and Eryk Bagshaw.  Updated January 22, 2021 — 12.53pm

John Coates, the Australian Olympic Committee president and International Olympic Committee vice-president, insists plans for the Tokyo Games are “proceeding fully”, saying there had been no discussion among organisers about another postponement or cancellation.

The future of the 2021 Tokyo Olympics had been thrown into doubt after a report surfaced suggesting the Japanese government had concluded the coronavirus pandemic would force the event to be cancelled.

John Coates, the Australian Olympic Committee president and International Olympic Committee vice-president, insists plans for the Tokyo Games are “proceeding fully”, saying there had been no discussion among organisers about another postponement or cancellation.

The future of the 2021 Tokyo Olympics had been thrown into doubt after a report surfaced suggesting the Japanese government had concluded the coronavirus pandemic would force the event to be cancelled.

Japanese government spokesman Manabu Sakai shut down the report within hours on Friday. “There is no truth to the report,” he said at a press conference.

Coates, who spoke to former Japanese prime minister and Tokyo 2021 organising committee president Yoshiro Mori on Thursday, told The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age the Olympics were still on track to be held this year with or without crowds.

“We’re meeting with them on operational matters now as we move closer to the Games. Then weekly we have, including last night, a meeting at the CEO level. And every few weeks we have a private chat to President Mori,” Coates, who is also the Tokyo 2020 co-ordination commission chair, said.

“They’re proceeding fully and Thomas Bach had a briefing of all the IOC members last night which was planned before Christmas and he’s doing the NOC [National Olympic Committee] presidents tonight. That was the message he and I gave.

“We won’t know until March, April or May how many spectators we can have. They should leave that as late as possible to see as they move out of summer the impact of the counter-measures they have now.”

The report also indicated that Tokyo organisers and the Japanese government had turned their attention to securing the next available Games, to be staged in 2032, as consolation for losing the already-postponed event, but Coates said that too was untrue.

“There’s been no discussion on that at all,” he said. “There is no discussion on 2032 with Japan because there is no discussion on not proceeding in Japan.

“Our biggest thing at the moment is to make sure the Japanese public are kept safe. They’ve got access to twice the number of [vaccine] doses than their population from three companies starting this month. So a lot of the decisions on venue capacity can be deferred to see the effect of that and the effect of the rollout around the world.“

Coates said the policy of the IOC and the AOC was not to put the athletes ahead of healthcare workers, the elderly and the sick in the queue for a COVID-19 vaccine.

“I’m aware that in some countries governments have committed to help the athletes [such as] Romania. Some of the NBA players [in the United States] are being vaccinated. We’re expecting people in the [English] Premier League will be vaccinated. We’re not expecting that here. We’re just hoping that they roll it out in sufficient time so that there wil be availability for two doses to go to our athletes before they go.”

The Games have been beset by rising political partisanship and unpopularity in Japan. A poll by national broadcaster NHK in December found only 27 per cent of the public supported hosting the event. The poll was taken before a winter coronavirus surge in which Japan hit an average of more than 6000 cases a day this week. The country recorded 100 deaths a day for the first time on Tuesday.

Japan’s opposition parties have seized on the public’s hostility, leading to rising political pressure within Suga’s ruling Liberal Democratic Party. The leader of the Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan, Yukio Edano, said on Thursday that it was “irresponsible to keep movingforward based only on wishful thinking”.

“We should batten down the hatches,” he said.

Suga declared a state of emergency in Tokyo on January 7, asked restaurants to close early and urged people to avoid non-essential travel as hospital wards moved towards capacity. The Japanese government is aiming to vaccinate most of the population by July but has yet to begin the program, which will target the vulnerable and the elderly first.

Taro Kono, the minister responsible for the rollout, hosed down on Wednesday reports that the general public would receive shots in May, two months out from the start of the Games. “I will do my best so that more people can get safe and effective vaccines at the earliest possible date,” he said.

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So, in this instance, it was a case of somebody saying something to somebody who put out a story without doing any research and then press agencies around globe spread the story without doing any research. Modern day journalism, you gotta love it.

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36 minutes ago, BTHarner said:

So, in this instance, it was a case of somebody saying something to somebody who put out a story without doing any research and then press agencies around globe spread the story without doing any research. Modern day journalism, you gotta love it.

I'm so irritated at the number of people I've seen on social media saying "I hear it was cancelled."  Yea, no kidding you heard that, because crappy information travels way too quick.

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I would have to wonder if perhaps athletes participation would be limited to countries who have gotten to the point where their athletes have been vaccinated and those countries willing to pay for their athletes to travel to Tokyo weeks before the Games to complete a mandatory 2 week quarantine.  Once in Japan I would think the athletes would be as isolated as possible for the duration of their competition.  But as has been stated by a few here, I have to believe that all parties involved are going to put maximum effort into developing a plan to stage the Games this year in some way shape or form.  The broadcast money is too lucrative and I realistically can't see Tokyo wanting to delay any further, let alone wait until 2032.

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IOC 'not considering' coronavirus vaccine as it pushes ahead with Tokyo Olympics planning

By Tracey Holmes for The Ticket and ABC Sport

Posted 28 January 2021

Credit:  ABC News Australia
 
One of the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) most senior officials says the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead even if athletes cannot be vaccinated beforehand.

IOC's head of media operations Lucia Montanarella is heavily involved in planning all the operational aspects of the Games with her counterparts from the Tokyo Organising Committee.

She briefed around 280 journalists from the International Sports Press Association (AIPS) on Wednesday morning (AEDT) and was asked whether strict reporting conditions at the Games would be relaxed if athletes, journalists and officials had been vaccinated beforehand.

"The reality is that we made a decision with Tokyo 2020 that we will go ahead and plan these Games without taking into consideration the vaccine and this is what we are doing," Ms Montanarella said.

"At this moment the vaccine doesn't come into play in any of our planning and that's the way we are going ahead.

"We would need another crystal ball to tell you something different but for the moment this is what we are doing — we are not considering the vaccine at all."

Tokyo's contingency plans are referred to as 'Project Crystal' because — according to Ms Montanarella — when the Games were postponed last March the IOC "needed a crystal ball to try and understand how the world will be in 15 months time".

With under six months to go the situation is still no clearer.

"One thing I want to tell you is that from the 24th of March [2020], the day of postponement, within the IOC there has never been a moment that we've been looking at the Tokyo Games as if it will happen, it's always been how we will make it happen," Ms Montanarella said.

"As (IOC) President Thomas Bach keeps saying, 'there is no plan B'."

Speaking from Switzerland on Wednesday evening (local time) Mr Bach reaffirmed that the Games would go ahead.

"The International Olympic Committee is fully concentrated and committed to the successful organisation of the Tokyo summer Olympics this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic," Mr Bach said.

Japan has not yet approved a vaccine inside the host nation, although plans are being drawn up to roll out a vaccination program once the go-ahead is given.

There is no confirmation that all 206 nations expected to send a team to Tokyo will have access to a vaccine and those that have are unlikely to add Olympic athletes to prioritised groups such as the elderly and health care workers.

There has been widespread condemnation any time it has been suggested.

Vaccination not 'obligatory' for athletes

Mr Bach has encouraged all member nations to engage with their own government authorities in the next few weeks to determine the likelihood of vaccinations for athletes and officials but it would not be mandatory in order to take part in the Games, which begin on July 23.

"Vaccination priority should be given to vulnerable groups, nurses, medical doctors and everyone who is keeping our societies safe," Mr Bach said.

"We encourage all the Olympic and Paralympic participants who are offered vaccination to accept it, also as an act of solidarity with the Japanese hosts and their fellow participants."

But Mr Bach added: "Vaccination will not be obligatory."

Federal Sport Minister Richard Colbeck said the Government would speak with the Australian Olympic Committee about the vaccine rollout, but vulnerable groups would be given priority ahead of athletes.

"The rollout of the national COVID-19 vaccine roadmap is an important measure to protect lives and livelihoods," he said in a statement. 

"The roadmap prioritises vulnerable groups including older Australians, frontline workers and those with underlying medical conditions. Other segments of Australia's population will be able to access the vaccine following these vulnerable groups.

"The Government will be consulting with the representatives of the Australian Olympic Committee and national sports bodies on the rollout of the vaccine over coming months and understand their needs in the lead-up to the Olympics."

According to the IOC, a 'tool box' of other COVID-19 countermeasures has been developed, including immigration procedures, quarantine measures, testing, personal protective equipment and contact tracing, as well as vaccination where possible.

The IOC and Tokyo organisers have been watching closely as other events have been staged around the world with the use of COVID-19 bubbles, reduced crowds and limited media access.

Ms Montanarella said there were some good lessons that have been learned but the operational nature of the Olympic Games was a much bigger challenge than any one single sporting event.

"While we are doing everything we can to have the widest media coverage we can at this Games, there will be some restrictions and some of them will be frustrating and there will be days when maybe people will not be able to go where they want," she said.

"The only thing I can say is that Tokyo 2020 and IOC media operations are really trying to do our best to allow for the widest number of people, the widest number of accreditations but … be prepared, it's going to be challenging.

"I don't want it to be a negative message, I want it to be a message conveying that despite all of our work it is not easy to deliver a safe environment if we don't stick with the numbers we have."

The Tokyo Olympic Games will be unlike any held previously, with the exception of the early editions in 1896 and 1900, with limited competitors, few spectators and reduced media coverage.

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