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Bid Of The Week 02 - Rio de Janiero 2012


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For my second look at a failed bid I've decided to go with Rio de Janeiro (thus referred to as simply Rio) 2012. Why? Well it's more of a WTF than anything and pure proof that geopolitics brought the Games to Rio this year - and little else.

rio-corcovado-pain-de-sucre2.jpg

The Rio 2012 bid started their pitch in quite the dramatic way -

For the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, we

believe we offer qualities that perfectly echo the
Olympic spirit and that no other city or country on
earth can offer in such abundance. The Games will
also make a world of difference to Rio, Brazil and
South America long after the closing ceremonies.
A PASSION FOR NATURE.
A PASSION FOR THE ENVIRONMENT.
A PASSION FOR LIFE.
A PASSION FOR EXCELLENCE.
A PASSION FOR THE FUTURE.
The bid offered the following venue plan -
VAWekyE.jpg
The IOC stated the following -

Rio has a low number (12) of existing venues (39%). However, importantly, through preparing for the 2007 Pan-American Games, ten (32%) sports venues are currently under construction or their construction will commence shortly. All of the permanent venues will be completed by 2007.

Nine (29%) additional venues will be required for the Olympic Games, of which three will be permanent. This gives a total of 31 venues.

The Rio sports concept covers four regions of the city in venue clusters, with Barra Olympic Park (18 sports including the Olympic Stadium) as a focal point, just 3km from the Olympic Village.

This high-density cluster of venues in Barra, together with the Olympic Village, MPC, IBC and Media Villages, may present significant operational challenges.

With the exception of road cycling and sailing (39km), volleyball and water polo (35km), all venues are in close proximity to the Olympic Village.

The venues under construction and those planned for the Olympic Games will provide Rio with a very positive sports legacy.

Not the most glowing review of the plans.

The transport issues were also given a dressing down -

Distances and travel times

Although a very large number of competition and non-competition venues are located in the proposed new Olympic Barra district, the proportion and number of stand alone venues in other areas is rather high. The average distance between Olympic competition and non-competition venues is similar to other Applicant Cities. However, the assumed average bus travel speeds of 63km/h appear unrealistic.

Transport organisation and traffic management at Games-time

The Olympic operational transport concept seems good for Barra, although the sheer number and size of the venues may generate increased transport congestion and overload. The concept presents considerable challenges for the rest of the Olympic system due to heavy potential congestion both on urban motorways and major arterial roads, as well as on rail or major bus routes on the proposed Olympic Ring, connecting Barra to other parts of the Rio metropolitan area

Security also came up -

The security Forces will be under the control of the Federal Government. Many venues in Rio are widespread and the requirement for security could stretch the resources available. The heavy concentration of some key venues in the Barra area may require a complex security solution. The technology and infrastructure to support the security operation will have to be developed. It is considered that the time needed to re-equip, train and implement new systems might not be sufficient.

Source file - http://www.olympic.org/Documents/Reports/EN/en_report_809.pdf

Now let's skip ahead to Rio de Janeiro 2016.

The venue plan which contains very, very few differences -

GT84a4R.jpg

Source file - https://issuu.com/thatsnotmypuppy/docs/rio2016questionnaire

And now the IOC has to say this about the venue plan -

In addition to the investment made in sports infrastructure for the 2007 PanAmerican Games, a further 12 venues are to be constructed from 2009 to 2015. This would have to be managed in terms of cost, time and resources.

A sound legacy plan has been developed through the creation of the National Olympic Training Centre catering for up to 20 sports post-Games, and the X-Park, an adventure sports park for high performance training and community participation, in close proximity to densely populated areas.

Now let's remember that the 2012 finalists were determined in 2004 - thus most infrastructure for the PanAms were planned (if not yet constructed). Their score has barely moved from the 2012 evaluation.

Now transport -

Distances and travel times

Due to its particular topography and urban development on all sides of the Tijuca National Park, the distances between Rio de Janeiro’s four Olympic zones are relatively long.

A large component of Rio’s Games concept is, however, centred in Barra, where distances and travel times between competition and non-competition venues are quite reasonable. The average travel distance would be 20 km, with an average travel time of 25-30 minutes.

The delivery of the proposed Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lines by 2016 would be essential.

Transport organisation and traffic management at Games-time

As a general policy, spectators and workforce will use public transport. In addition to the new, 4 line BRT system, Rio plans to implement 150 km of Olympic lanes connecting the four Olympic zones and the airport.

Score wise we have suddenly jumped from a minimum 3 to maximum 6 to minimum 6 and maximum 8 for Games Time transport without any real difference in on the ground transport between the two bids.

Now security -

The National Secretary of Public Security, reporting to the Ministry of Justice, would have overall responsibility for the security of the Olympic Games. Building on the recent experience of the 2007 Pan American Games, the operational capability and resources of the security agencies has been improved and technical equipment provided. Brazil will also host the FIFA Football World Cup in 2014 which will further enhance operational experience. Crime in parts of Rio de Janeiro was considered to be an issue for the safety of people attending the Olympic Games. Should Rio be selected as a Candidate City, assurances regarding protection and safety of persons travelling through certain parts of the city would be required.

Almost a glowing review (remember this report was pre-FIFA 2014). From a 2012 minimum 3.9 to maximum 4.8 to in 2016 a minimum 4.6 to a maximum 7.0...

Source file - http://www.olympic.org/Documents/Reports/EN/en_report_1317.pdf

Now I am just touching on 3 topics out of a dozen or so that all show large leaps.

So it is obvious the IOC wanted to go to South America at any cost. And I am not in any way saying any dubious was done by the Rio bidders - just commenting on the phenomenal about face from the IOC when it comes to them actively wanting to see the bright side of a candidate.

Do you think the somewhat disturbing largesse of Beijing 2008 played a hand in the IOC turn about?

Is there something in timing your bid that South Africa/Qatar/Turkey should learn?

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Having seen both Istanbul and Rio up close w/in the last 4 years, all I can say is that both are very vast, very dense, very built-up megalopolis'; and Rio's geography is very challenging. And that's the conundrum, the geography is FAR from compact but it will be providing wonderful vistas for the TV cameras, so it will all be an illusion -- and going to the Games this year will just be for the hardy, the dedicated and the officials. Yeah, you could go to party -- but for dedicated Olympo-philes like Chateau Petrus, for one, who has tickets to a good smattering of events, the travel and connecting times will be quite nerve-wracking to say the least. Am glad I will just be enjoying the Games on TV.

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Didn't Rio 2004 propose a new stadium which would have served ceremonies and athletics at around 70,000?

Yes they did - that stadium was downsized and eventually built - thus we have the existing Joao Havelange Stadum.

Having seen both Istanbul and Rio up close w/in the last 4 years, all I can say is that both are very vast, very dense, very built-up megalopolis'; and Rio's geography is very challenging. And that's the conundrum, the geography is FAR from compact but it will be providing wonderful vistas for the TV cameras, so it will all be an illusion -- and going to the Games this year will just be for the hardy, the dedicated and the officials. Yeah, you could go to party -- but for dedicated Olympo-philes like Chateau Petrus, for one, who has tickets to a good smattering of events, the travel and connecting times will be quite nerve-wracking to say the least. Am glad I will just be enjoying the Games on TV.

I had a similar hesitance about Beijing and it worked out OK. Rushing from a handball prelim at the Olympic Sports Center Gym into the Olympic Green for a gymnastic session at the National Indoor Stadium followed by a mad dash out to Shunyi for a rowing session and then finally back into town for a boxing session at the Workers Gym... never again. Unless all events are within an Olympic Park type setting it's two events max a day. Way too stressful. I'll also be watching Rio from home but plan to attend the next three more "local" Asian games (and the Sapporo Asian Winter Games next Feb).

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