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2016 Political Crisis in Brazil


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Following LatinXTC advise, I decided to make a separate thread to talk about the ongoing political crisis in Brazil, in order to not keep deviating the News thread from its original purpose. Let's talk about it here from now on.

Rival Brazil protests ignite debate on race and class

http://news.yahoo.com/rival-brazil-protests-ignite-debate-race-class-102859155.html

Brasília (AFP) - Rival protests sweeping Brazil have exposed a demographic divide between President Dilma Rousseff's haters and her backers, igniting a national debate about race and class that is only increasing tensions.

Waving the red banners of the ruling Workers' Party, Rousseff's left-wing base sought to seize back the streets this week, after tides of protesters draped in the yellow and green of the national flag marched nationwide last Sunday calling for her impeachment.

The opposing theme colors were not the only difference in hue: the anti-government protesters were a visibly whiter crowd than the Rousseff supporters.

They were also wealthier and better-educated than average Brazilians, pollsters found.

Mafa Nogueira, a Rousseff supporter who joined the rally in the capital Brasilia on Friday, described the people calling for impeachment as elites panicked by the social changes reshaping Brazil after 13 years of leftist rule.

"The people who are desperate for this government to fall are the ones who lost their privileges," said the 42-year-old musician.

Brazil has undergone a transformation since Rousseff's predecessor and mentor, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, took office in 2003.

In the decade that followed, strong economic growth and progressive social programs lifted tens of millions of people out of poverty.

Historian John French said he sees a conservative backlash against this new social order in the anti-government protests.

"They're discomforted by the fact that people are rising to places where they're not supposed to be," said French, a Brazil specialist at Duke University in North Carolina.

"For example, a lot of poor people are now flying in airplanes, which really outrages them, because airports used to be an upper-class preserve. Or the tripling of the number of people going to higher education."

- Troubled history -

Anti-Rousseff protesters reject that characterization.

Jefferson Banks, a leader of the anti-government movement in Brasilia, said talk of race and class divisions seeks to distract from the issues that have left Rousseff hanging by a thread: a colossal corruption scandal, a drawn-out recession and government dysfunctionality.

"It takes the focus off the real issue our movement raises and shifts the debate to other issues: whites and blacks, rich and poor," he told AFP.

But the numbers are awkward in a country known for its racial diversity and a troubled history of inequality dating back to the time of slavery -- abolished in 1888.

At the largest anti-Rousseff protest, in Sao Paulo, 77 percent of the demonstrators self-identified as white, and 77 percent were university graduates, according to polling firm Datafolha.

Nationwide, those figures are 48 percent and 13 percent, respectively.

Half the protesters in Sao Paulo last weekend earned between five and 20 times the minimum wage.

Blacks make up 50.7 percent of the sprawling South American country's 200 million people, and a disproportionately large part of the 7.3 percent who live in poverty -- a figure that has fallen from 25.2 percent in 2003.

- A house divided -

The anti-government protests are less broad-based than the last wave of outrage that swept Brazil, in 2013, in the build-up to hosting the World Cup.

Then, Brazilians from many walks of life took to the streets demanding better services such as transportation, education and health care.

At the time, some political analysts suggested the Workers' Party was a victim of its own success: gains in income and education were making voters more demanding of their government.

Despite the tumult, Rousseff went on to narrowly win re-election in 2014.

But with the economy in a tailspin and scandal ensnaring top officials -- including Lula, who faces charges of accepting bribes -- her popularity has plunged to 10 percent, and 68 percent of Brazilians support impeaching her.

But only a portion of those who disapprove of her are taking to the street.

The fact that the current protests have drawn a narrower demographic has raised suspicions of undemocratic ulterior motives.

"Corruption is systemic in Brazil. It wasn't invented by the Workers' Party. They're using that argument to hide their real objective: to seize power," said retiree Margarita Brega at Friday's pro-government demo in Rio de Janeiro.

Nogueira, the musician at the pro-government demo in Brasilia, said there is a difference in inclusiveness between the two camps.

"It's not that the people who support Dilma's government are black and poor. The people who support a 'coup' are white and rich. There's a big difference," he said.

- Losing friends -

But the divisions are not always black and white.

Last Sunday, a photo went viral on social media of an affluent white couple on their way to protest, bringing their little white dog and their two toddlers, pushed in a stroller by a black nanny wearing a white uniform.

The picture sparked vitriolic exchanges about racial inequality and whether wealthy whites should be demanding "justice."

But the nanny later told interviewers she herself supported the protests and voted against Rousseff in 2014.

In the highly polarized atmosphere, many Brazilians complain the tone of the debate has turned nasty.

"People complain that they're losing friends because of political hatred," said political analyst Michael Mohallem.

"People are not hearing each other, they're not reasoning with each other."

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Blablablabla the same old fairy tales. Good thing we're in the 21th century and most people already knows better. Everything was done in a legal way, using instruments which are stated at the consti

Meanwhile our government is sending free electric energy plants to Brazil, and at the same time there will be rationing of electricity for 40 days (4 hours without energy every day) because the water

Following LatinXTC advise, I decided to make a separate thread to talk about the ongoing political crisis in Brazil, in order to not keep deviating the News thread from its original purpose. Let's tal

So quick question on the protesters. We have one side of the political protests demanding the Dilma step down and there be a military coup, and we have the other side against the military coup. Are most of those against the military coup actually IN SUPPORT of Dilma, or are there a lot of them supportive of her only because they don't want to see a military coup?

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So quick question on the protesters. We have one side of the political protests demanding the Dilma step down and there be a military coup, and we have the other side against the military coup. Are most of those against the military coup actually IN SUPPORT of Dilma, or are there a lot of them supportive of her only because they don't want to see a military coup?

You got it all wrong about the protests against the government.
People don't want any coup. Military coup is not an alternative and everybody hates that idea, with very few exception like 5 people in 1 million people crowds.
All the protests against the government want Dilma to resign or be impeached, a practice completely based on our Constitution when the president commits crimes, therefore completely legal and democratic. Those are nonpartisan protests and completely organized (or not organized, like the spontaneous protests of last wednesday) by groups with no connections to any political party.
In fact, after the end of the dictatorship, Fernando Collor (democratically elected) was impeached based on the constitution and at that time this was supported by the party of the current government and also many current opposition parties.
In general, everybody is against any kind of military coup. Most of the country is in favor of the impeachment and continuation of Lava Jato investigations, but a smaller group -people in red- (integrants of Workers' Party, and other associated parties) want the government to continue and protest against Lava Jato investigations and charges against members of Workers' Party, like Dilma and Lula.
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Following LatinXTC advise, I decided to make a separate thread to talk about the ongoing political crisis in Brazil, in order to not keep deviating the News thread from its original purpose. Let's talk about it here from now on.

A very good idea. Let's wait for reasoned arguments here.

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So quick question on the protesters. We have one side of the political protests demanding the Dilma step down and there be a military coup, and we have the other side against the military coup. Are most of those against the military coup actually IN SUPPORT of Dilma, or are there a lot of them supportive of her only because they don't want to see a military coup?

Taking away a handful of people which have no regard for democracy, neither Mme. Rousseff supporters, neither those who are against her want a coup.

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So quick question on the protesters. We have one side of the political protests demanding the Dilma step down and there be a military coup, and we have the other side against the military coup. Are most of those against the military coup actually IN SUPPORT of Dilma, or are there a lot of them supportive of her only because they don't want to see a military coup?

It´s not work like that. The militaries couldnt be more quiet.

Lula (and his party PT) had a big time support to become president in 2002 elections. At the begin, he was a lot popular until the corruptions scandals start to appear to public.

First, there was a scandal called Mensalão, where a lot of PT personalities were arrested due corruption. Despite, Lula was so popular that he could reelect himself and make his successor (Dilma, the present president).

The fact is that the scandals increased since an police operation called Lava Jato discovered that PT was changing big contracts with Petrobras (biggest brazilian state company) for money beside tons of another ilegal operations.

A lot of big time business men were arrested and they already confessed their crimes. These crimes were also investigated and proved in international basis (most of the robbed money were moved to Switzerland that is returning the money to Brazil). Finally, the investigation was able to find the politics side of the corruption (Lula was benefited with proprierties and Dilma´s presidential campaigns were supplied by this money).

So, PT that was so popular, nowadays are hated by 75% of the brazilian population. There are also an impeachment process and several criminal process against Lula and PT politics. In one of these process, a judge decided to bug Lula´s phone and discovered a lot of ilegal and unconstitucional pratices (like the fact that Lula was appointed minister by miss president only to delay the criminal process and prevent his arrest).

Because that PT started to scream that the brazilian upper classes are trying to take the power ilegally. They tell that everybody robs and that they didnt invented the corruption in Brazil. So, basicly people are trying to take them from the power because Lula was poor sometime in his life and people are envious.

All in all, PT are trying to paint the process as political and the judge as a kind of devil. They have only the support from some big works unions (they are very confused with PT and dont really represent workers interests) and from some lefty "intelectuals" who are so arrogant to admit that their recent support to PT was a mistake.

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On the other side: Democracy defenders (against the coup)

Black movement, Gay Rights movement, the Feminist movement and all popular movements in Brazil against the coup.

SÃO PAULO (Brazil's Finantial Center)

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Ato em Defesa da Democracia e Contra o Golpe SP 18/03/2016 by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

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Ato em Defesa da Democracia e Contra o Golpe SP 18/03/2016 by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

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Ato em Defesa da Democracia e Contra o Golpe SP 18/03/2016 by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

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Ato em Defesa da Democracia e Contra o Golpe SP 18/03/2016 by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

BELO HORIZONTE (A very important Brazilian city)

'Workers against the coup'

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Sem título by Ninja Midia, no Flickr


Black movement and Gay Rights movement

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Sem título by Ninja Midia, no Flickr
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Sem título by Ninja Midia, no Flickr
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Sem título by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

BRASÍLIA (Capital of Brazil)

'We want Peace, Justice and Democracy'

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#VemPraDemocracia • 18/03/2016 • Brasília-DF by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

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#VemPraDemocracia • 18/03/2016 • Brasília-DF by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

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#VemPraDemocracia • 18/03/2016 • Brasília-DF by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

And 'Singing for Democracy', in Rio

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Canto da Democracia | 18-03-2016 | Rio de Janeiro by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

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Canto da Democracia | 18-03-2016 | Rio de Janeiro by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

25802748781_d1754ba490_b.jpg

Canto da Democracia | 18-03-2016 | Rio de Janeiro by Ninja Midia, no Flickr

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In Brazil, supporters of Democracy (against the coup) accuse pro impeachment supporters of 'fascists' and 'a white middle-class' in its vast majority. Supporters of Democracy (against the coup) also accused Globo TV of manipulation and appoint supporters of the coup as 'massa de manobra' or 'inocente útil' (people manipulated by the media, as in 1964 during the military coup).

The most important Brazilian artists are against the coup:

Chico Buarque (
our great composer)
Caetano Veloso
Gilberto Gil
Roberto Carlos (considered 'the king of the Brazilian music')
Luis Fernando Verissimo (
Our great writer)
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In Brazil, supporters of Democracy (against the coup) accuse pro impeachment supporters of 'fascists' and 'a white middle-class' in its vast majority. Supporters of Democracy (against the coup) also accused Globo TV of manipulation and appoint supporters of the coup as 'massa de manobra' or 'inocente útil' (people manipulated by the media, as in 1964 during the military coup).

The most important Brazilian artists are against the coup:

Chico Buarque (our great composer)

Caetano Veloso

Gilberto Gil

Roberto Carlos (considered 'the king of the Brazilian music')

Luis Fernando Verissimo (Our great writer)

No one else in the world know who the hell they are and they sure as hell don't care.

What the rest of the world wants to know is... what does Xuxa have to say about these protests???

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No one else in the world know who the hell they are and they sure as hell don't care.

What the rest of the world wants to know is... what does Xuxa have to say about these protests???

Xuxa is not a thinker. But she is pro-impeachment, I think (I'm not sure).

And about Xuxa, this month the 'Queen of Children' posted a picture with 3 little children working on the streets. Her face is not serious or sad. She was criticized by many people.

The picture:

alx_xuxa_original.jpg

From: http://www.brasilpost.com.br/2016/03/07/xuxa-criancas-de-rua_n_9398666.html

http://famosidades.com.br/famosos/xuxa-e-criticada-por-publicar-foto-com-criancas-trabalhando-na-rua-e-rebate-da-um-tempo.html

*The black box on the eyes was made by me.

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The vast majority of articles in English are just superficial. But Glenn Greenwald wrote an interesting article about the real situation in Brazil:

March 18, 2016

Brazil Is Engulfed by Ruling Class Corruption — and a Dangerous Subversion of Democracy

By Glenn Greenwald, Andrew Fishman and David Miranda

THE MULTIPLE, REMARKABLE crises consuming Brazil are now garnering substantial Western media attention. That’s understandable given that Brazil is the world’s fifth most populous country and eighth-largest economy; its second-largest city, Rio de Janeiro, is the host of this year’s Summer Olympics. But much of this Western media coverage mimics the propaganda coming from Brazil’s homogenized, oligarch-owned, anti-democracy media outlets and, as such, is misleading, inaccurate, and incomplete, particularly when coming from those with little familiarity with the country (there are numerous Brazil-based Western reporters doing outstanding work).

It is difficult to overstate the severity of Brazil’s multi-level distress. This short paragraph yesterday from the New York Times’s Brazil bureau chief, Simon Romero, conveys how dire it is:
Brazil is suffering its worst economic crisis in decades. An enormous graft scheme has hobbled the national oil company. The Zika epidemic is causing despair across the northeast. And just before the world heads to Brazil for the Summer Olympics, the government is fighting for survival, with almost every corner of the political system under the cloud of scandal.
Brazil’s extraordinary political upheaval shares some similarities with the Trump-led political chaos in the U.S.: a sui generis, out-of-control circus unleashing instability and some rather dark forces, with a positive ending almost impossible to imagine. The once-remote prospect of President Dilma Rousseff’s impeachment now seems likely.
But one significant difference with the U.S. is that Brazil’s turmoil is not confined to one politician. The opposite is true, as Romero notes: “almost every corner of the political system [is] under the cloud of scandal.” That includes not only Rousseff’s moderately left-wing Workers Party, or PT — which is rife with serious corruption — but also the vast majority of the centrist and right-wing political and economic factions working to destroy PT, which are drowning in at least an equal amount of criminality. In other words, PT is indeed deeply corrupt and awash in criminal scandal, but so is virtually every political faction working to undermine it and vying to seize that party’s democratically obtained power.
In reporting on Brazil, Western media outlets have most prominently focused on the increasingly large street protests demanding the impeachment of Rousseff. They have typically depicted those protests in idealized, cartoon terms of adoration: as an inspiring, mass populist uprising against a corrupt regime. Last night, NBC News’s Chuck Todd re-tweeted the Eurasia Group’s Ian Bremmer describing anti-Dilma protests as “The People vs. the President” — a manufactured theme consistent with what is being peddled by Brazil’s anti-government media outlets such as Globo:
That narrative is, at best, a radical oversimplification of what is happening and, more often, crass propaganda designed to undermine a left-wing party long disliked by U.S. foreign policy elites. That depiction completely ignores the historical context of Brazil’s politics and, more importantly, several critical questions: Who is behind these protests, how representative are the protesters of the Brazilian population, and what is their actual agenda?
THE CURRENT VERSION of Brazilian democracy is very young. In 1964, the country’s democratically elected left-wing government was overthrown by a military coup. Both publicly and before Congress, U.S. officials vehemently denied any role, but — needless to say — documents and recordings subsequently emerged proving the U.S. directly supported and helped plot critical aspects of that coup.
The 21-year, right-wing, pro-U.S. military dictatorship that ensued was brutal and tyrannical, specializing in torture techniques used against dissidents that were taught to the dictatorship by the U.S. and U.K. A comprehensive 2014 Truth Commission report documented that both countries “trained Brazilian interrogators in torture techniques.” Among their victims was Rousseff, who was an anti-regime, left-wing guerilla imprisoned and tortured by the military dictators in the 1970s.
The coup itself and the dictatorship that followed were supported by Brazil’s oligarchs and their large media outlets, led by Globo, which — notably — depicted the 1964 coup as a noble defeat of a corrupt left-wing government (sound familiar?). The 1964 coup and dictatorship were also supported by the nation’s extravagantly rich (and overwhelmingly white) upper class and its small middle class. As democracy opponents often do, Brazil’s wealthy factions regarded dictatorship as protection against the impoverished masses comprised largely of non-whites. As The Guardian put it upon release of the Truth Commission report: “As was the case elsewhere in Latin America in the 1960s and 1970s, the elite and middle class aligned themselves with the military to stave off what they saw as a communist threat.”
These severe class and race divisions in Brazil remain the dominant dynamic. As the BBC put it in 2014 based on multiple studies: “Brazil has one of the highest levels of income inequality in the world.” The Americas Quarterly editor-in-chief, Brian Winter, reporting on the protests, wrote this week: “The gap between rich and poor remains the central fact of Brazilian life — and these protests are no different.” If you want to understand anything about the current political crisis in Brazil, it’s crucial to understand what Winter means by that.
DILMA’S PARTY, PT, was formed in 1980 as a classic Latin American left-wing socialist party. To improve its national appeal, it moderated its socialist dogma and gradually became a party more akin to Europe’s social democrats. There are now popular parties to its left; indeed, Dilma, voluntarily or otherwise, has advocated austerity measures to cure economic ills and assuage foreign markets, and just this week enacted a draconian “anti-terrorism” law. Still, PT resides on the center-left wing of Brazil’s spectrum and its supporters are overwhelmingly Brazil’s poor and racial minorities. In power, PT has ushered in a series of economic and social reforms that have provided substantial government benefits and opportunities, which have lifted millions of Brazilians out of poverty.
PT has held the presidency for 14 years: since 2002. Its popularity has been the byproduct of Dilma’s wildly charismatic predecessor, Luíz Inácio Lula da Silva (universally referred to as Lula). Lula’s ascendency was a potent symbol of the empowerment of Brazil’s poor under democracy: a laborer and union leader from a very poor family who dropped out of school in the second grade, did not read until the age of 10, and was imprisoned by the dictatorship for union activities. He has long been mocked by Brazilian elites in starkly classist tones for his working-class accent and manner of speaking.
Brazil's Workers Party presidential candidate Dilma Rousseff, left, reacts as Brazil's President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva speaks to supporters during a campaign rally in Goiania, Brazil, Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2010. Rousseff will face Jose Serra, presidential candidate of the Brazilian Social Democratic Party, PSDB, in an election runoff Oct. 31. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres) Lula and Dilma campaign together in the 2010 election. Photo: Eraldo Peres/APAfter three unsuccessful runs for the presidency, Lula proved to be an unstoppable political force. Elected in 2002 and re-elected in 2006, he left office with such high approval ratings that he was able to ensure the election of his previously unknown hand-picked successor, Dilma, who was then re-elected in 2014. It has long been assumed that Lula — who vocally opposes austerity measures — intends to run again for president in 2018 after completion of Dilma’s second term, and anti-PT forces are petrified that he’d again beat them at the ballot box.
Though the nation’s oligarchical class has successfully used the center-right PSDB as a counterweight, it has been largely impotent in defeating PT in four consecutive presidential elections. Voting is compulsory, and the nation’s poor citizens have ensured PT’s victories.
Corruption among Brazil’s political class — including the top levels of the PT — is real and substantial. But Brazil’s plutocrats, their media, and the upper and middle classes are glaringly exploiting this corruption scandal to achieve what they have failed for years to accomplish democratically: the removal of PT from power.
Contrary to Chuck Todd’s and Ian Bremmer’s romanticized, misinformed (at best) depiction of these protests as being carried out by “The People,” they are, in fact, incited by the country’s intensely concentrated, homogenized, and powerful corporate media outlets, and are composed (not exclusively but overwhelmingly) of the nation’s wealthier, white citizens who have long harbored animosity toward PT and anything that smacks of anti-poverty programs.
  • Brazil’s corporate media outlets are acting as de facto protest organizers and PR arms of opposition parties. The Twitter feeds of some of Globo’s most influential (and very rich) on-air reporters contain non-stop anti-PT agitation. When a recording of a telephone conversation between Dilma and Lula was leaked this week, Globo’s highly influential nightly news program, Jornal Nacional, had its anchors flamboyantly re-enact the dialogue in such a melodramatic and provocatively gossipy fashion that it literally resembled a soap opera far more than a news report, prompting widespread ridicule. For months, Brazil’s top four newsmagazines have devoted cover after cover to inflammatory attacks on Dilma and Lula, usually featuring ominous photos of one or the other and always with a strikingly unified narrative.
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This can be considered a coup:

Supreme Court Minister Teori Zavascki takes proceedings against Lula from the hands of Judge Sergio Moro

http://g1.globo.com/politica/operacao-lava-jato/noticia/2016/03/teori-determina-que-moro-envie-investigacao-sobre-lula-para-o-stf.html

It's unconstitutional, since as Lula is not someone with privileged forum (as he is not a minister), he can not be investigated by the Supreme Court.

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But of fucking course. ._.

Danny Glover also loved to shill for Chavez government back in the day. He even was a guest actor for a film they did about one of our independence heroes some years ago.

He ruined the Lethal Weapons movies for me (not that Mel Gibson is much better as a human being anyway)

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THIS WEEK
Important Teachers and Historians are boycotting the
traditional channels and media newspapers in Brazil, like Globo/ GloboNews and Folha de S. Paulo:
For Reginaldo Nasser, a important political scientist of the University of São Paulo (the Brazilian Harvard), the 'journalism' made in this channel (GloboNews) is not a real Journalism.
And for Rafael Marquese, a important Historian of the University of São Paulo, Folha de S. Paulo is a pro-coup media.

To understand:

Globo (with GloboNews, O Globo Newspaper, Época Magazine and some radio channels) is the large media oligopoly group in Brazil, based in Rio.

Folha de S. Paulo (São Paulo) is considered one of the largest and most important newspapers in the country, with O Globo (Rio) and Estadão (São Paulo).


These media groups supported the Coup in 1964 and the dictatorial governments in Brazil. O Globo newspaper was against the thirteenth salary for workers in 1962. And TV Globo (or Globo TV) manipulated the televised debate in 89 (against Lula).

globo_tv_midiatic_manipulation_in_brazil
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Will the political convulsions now be part of the Opening Ceremony? I mean, I think it would be odd NOT to include any of this if they're doing a history of Brazil!

BTW, yesterday, I already set foot on Brazilian soil. Went to the Brasilian Consulate in SF to get my visa!!

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Will the political convulsions now be part of the Opening Ceremony? I mean, I think it would be odd NOT to include any of this if they're doing a history of Brazil!

BTW, yesterday, I already set foot on Brazilian soil. Went to the Brasilian Consulate in SF to get my visa!!

I'm curious, are consulates/embassies located within close proximity to each other in San Francisco or other cities, or is it the norm to have them spread out all over a city? Since Houston has no zoning laws, the largest city in the US without any zoning laws, I thought that was the main reason why they have consulates in the most random of places.

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Will the political convulsions now be part of the Opening Ceremony? I mean, I think it would be odd NOT to include any of this if they're doing a history of Brazil!

BTW, yesterday, I already set foot on Brazilian soil. Went to the Brasilian Consulate in SF to get my visa!!

Welcome.

Al Jazeera has made the most complete compilation about the political (or cognitive?) crisis in Brazil, this week:

Al Jazeera talks about media manipulation, the white (and hysterical) Brazilian middle class against the Workers Party
and the five families that dominate the information in Brazil.

Prints:

crisis_political_brazil.png

crisis_political_brazil_00.png

political_crisis_in_brazil.png
The sensationalism of newspapers and magazines against Lula (as Medusa) and Dilma ('a defeated woman')

political_crisis_in_brazil_02.png
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To understand the social upheaval in Brazil.

Al Jazeera has made the most complete compilation about the political (or cognitive?) crisis in Brazil, this week:

Al Jazeera talks about media manipulation, the white (and hysterical) Brazilian middle class against the Workers Party
and the five families that dominate the information in Brazil.

Prints:

crisis_political_brazil.png

crisis_political_brazil_00.png

political_crisis_in_brazil.png
The sensationalism of newspapers and magazines against Lula (as Medusa) and Dilma ('a defeated woman')

political_crisis_in_brazil_02.png
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Lava Jato respects strictly the Constitution says Carmen Lucia

http://www.valor.com.br/politica/4496528/lava-jato-respeita-%3Frigorosamente%3F-constituicao-diz-carmen-lucia

Impeachment is a process provided in the Constitution, says Supreme Court ministers

Ministers of the Supreme Court reacted to the statements of President Dilma Rousseff that the impeachment is attempted coup

http://g1.globo.com/bom-dia-brasil/noticia/2016/03/impeachment-e-processo-previsto-na-constituicao-dizem-ministros-do-stf.html

New York Times

Brazil’s Political Crisis Deepens
President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil is fighting for political survival as calls for her impeachment grow louder amid a widening corruption investigation and a tanking economy.
Astonishingly, however, she appears to have felt she had political capital to spare last week when she appointed her predecessor and political mentor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, to be chief of staff, a move that largely shields him, for now, from prosecution in the corruption scandal involving his ties to giant construction companies.
Ms. Rousseff’s explanation was tone deaf and ridiculous. She characterized the appointment as an opportunity to bring back to the government a maverick politician and talented negotiator to help Brazil contend with an assortment of crises, including the spread of the Zika virus.
[...]
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'Fortune" puts Sérgio Moro as one of the greatest world leaders

The american magazine "Fortune", included Sérgio Moro among the most capable leaders to transform the world.

The publication says the Moro, responsible for Lava Jato investigations, leads a case that has been putting in the past "the long endemy of corruption in Latin America".

The judge is the number 13 in the list. Close to him, there are names such as Pope Francis, Angela Merkel and the argentine president Maurício Macri.

More: http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/poder/2016/03/1753769-revista-fortune-coloca-sergio-moro-como-um-dos-grandes-lideres-mundiais.shtml

The New York Times

Brazil’s Political Crisis Deepens

President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil is fighting for political survival as calls for her impeachment grow louder amid a widening corruption investigation and a tanking economy.
Astonishingly, however, she appears to have felt she had political capital to spare last week when she appointed her predecessor and political mentor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, to be chief of staff, a move that largely shields him, for now, from prosecution in the corruption scandal involving his ties to giant construction companies.
Ms. Rousseff’s explanation was tone deaf and ridiculous. She characterized the appointment as an opportunity to bring back to the government a maverick politician and talented negotiator to help Brazil contend with an assortment of crises, including the spread of the Zika virus.
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One of the leaders of the movements against PT is murdered in Guarulhos

The criminal lawyer Leandro Balcone, 35, was shot and stabbed, on Tuesday (22), in his office in the municipality of Guarulhos, SP. The death of the lawyer worried MBL and the Workers' Party, which issued official notes after the murder. Balcone was activist opposed to the government of Dilma Rousseff. "It is with great sadness that we received the news of the death of Leandro Balcone. Balcone was a fellow soldier in this town, and is a great loss in this journey, "said a part of the Brazil Free Movement note.

Coincidence?
In the same week, the plane where was the businessman Roger Agnelli, former president of the mining company Vale, died in the crash of the single-engine plane of its ownership in a residence in Casa Verde, North Zone of Sao Paulo.
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In addition to chairing Vale, Agnelli joined the board of directors of large Brazilian companies such as Companhia Siderurgica Nacional (CSN), Companhia Paulista de Forca e Luz (CPFL), Latasa, Suzano and Petrobras. Agnelli joined the Petrobras Council at the beginning of the first term of President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, and left in 2007.
Whereas Agnelli left the presidency of the Valley after much own government pressure, many believe that he was very much against the administration of PT and could represent an aid to investigations of Lava Jato. Social networks spread discussions of all kinds and origins wondering if the two deaths have some kind of connection.
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