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Tokyo 2020 Ceremonies


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10 hours ago, SeriousPotato said:

Surprisingly, I just found it!

 

Apart from the obvious seizure issue, I really dig the vibe of this video. Very expressive and unexpected for its time.

Ha ha! I would give you a like, but Gamesbids still think's it's yesterday and I've used up my quota.

Odd thing about the video is that the actual logo is a lot more blocky and less spiky than the shards from which it fictionally emerges- and the the shards are not clearly related to the "Look" with multiple crossing lines, as seen on the 2012 medals.

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13 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

Didn't say it wasn't.  Edo might be too. I'm just stating a very odd juxtaposition vs. the host city named Tokyo.  And why doesn't she go by her father's name, Francois?

Just convenient for her to use Japanese name to lead her life as Japanese. BTW,Naomi's mom is from Sapporo.

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Studio Ponoc (anime studio formed by many former members of the legendary Studio Ghibli) released a 9 minute animated film in celebration of the games. Its actually pretty nice looking. Imagine if the opening show had a theme like this (though I heard Miyazaki himself wasn't a very big fan of the Olympics).

 

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On 7/23/2021 at 9:02 AM, Choongie said:

That's the second best cauldron design in Olympic Games' history, in my opinion.

It is a beautiful cauldron. What is your best cauldron?

In all the ceremony to me was just ok. As mentioned multiple times it was disjointed, but I didn’t hate it. Met my expectations. Was hoping for more but oh well. With the late changes to the ceremonies team and the unpredictable pandemic situation, it was bound to suffer. 

To me the best ceremonies have a continuous thread and clear narrative without being overly interrupted by protocol segments. No real wow moments in Tokyo except for maybe the drones but too bad it was connected to the corny Imagine song (although well-performed).

 

 

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36 minutes ago, LA1984 said:

It is a beautiful cauldron. What is your best cauldron?

In all the ceremony to me was just ok. As mentioned multiple times it was disjointed, but I didn’t hate it. Met my expectations. Was hoping for more but oh well. With the late changes to the ceremonies team and the unpredictable pandemic situation, it was bound to suffer. 

To me the best ceremonies have a continuous thread and clear narrative without being overly interrupted by protocol segments. No real wow moments in Tokyo except for maybe the drones but too bad it was connected to the corny Imagine song (although well-performed).

 

 

In my opinion, the best cauldron design is the one from London 2012.

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I found the cauldron kind of ugly - it reminded be somewhat of the 2018 cauldron which was awful. I did love the reveal of the staircase with Naomi Osaka at the base (reminded me of Cathy Freeman in Sydney). 

Best cauldrons in my opinion were Mexico City 1968, Barcelona 1992, Athens 2004, and London 2012.

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Posted (edited)

Hard to judge "best" of cauldrons.  They are really of different schools.  Here's my take on a few of the more outstanding cauldrons:

PC 2018 - totally unimaginative and predictable 

London 2012 - beautiful when first lit, but too difficult to create -- and where is it now?  :blink: 

Barcelona 1992 - was memorable NOT because of the cauldron which was meh!  but because of the flying arrow that was used to light it. 

Sydney 2000 - breathtaking when it first rose from the waters; but after getting stuck - trying too hard.   This and Barcelona still top the "where did they hide?/how will they light it" category!  

Vancouver 2010 - another "trying too hard" category 

Rio 2016 - that was NOT a cauldron.  It was an attachment to the back of one, like an earring just reflecting the flame in the simple bowl in front.  Wasn't even an original design--off the rack of Anthony Howe's catalogue. Take away the damn sculpture and you still had the bowl in front of you.

Athens 2004 - That was all they could come up with?  A reed?  :blink:  And only because it was all that could fit into that space. But "cauldron" consistent with its torch design.  

Atlanta 1996 - A total, UGLY disappointment! 

Beijing 2008 - another of those TRYING TOO HARD to impress.  Also, 

Torino 2006 - beautiful design but WAY TOO HIGH for anyone to relate to.  

Salt Lake 2002 - Nice design; not too ostentatious.   The best to manifest the theme of its Games - Light the Fire Within.  

Tokyo 2020ne is a nice design; modest  but where will it end up?  

I think LARGEST CARBON FOOTPRINT and biggest WASTER of natural gas:
1.  Beijing 2008 (of course, it's China)
2.  Vancouver 2010 (out in the harbor no less) 
3.  Atlanta 1996 
- Just wait until India gets a shot at having its own cauldron!! :lol:

Torino and Salt Lake were probably the last 2 which fulfilled the IOC's Charter of what a cauldron should be (which was written for a Summer Games, not a Winter Games). 
 

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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14 minutes ago, baron-pierreIV said:

London 2012 - beautiful when first lit, but too difficult to create -- and where is it now?  :blink:

As you know, the bits which matter, the "copper petals" with country names on, were given to the NOCs (and NPCs) of the relevant nations. The mechanical bit went to the Museum of London.

The Olympic Park retains the Great Big Bell, and the Ridiculously Big Twisty Tower Thing.

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Just now, JMarkSnow2012 said:

As you know, the bits which matter, the "copper petals" with country names on, were given to the NOCs (and NPCs) of the relevant nations. The mechanical bit went to the Museum of London.

The Olympic Park retains the Great Big Bell, and the Ridiculously Big Twisty Tower Thing.

Yeah, it's like "spreading your seed" to the winds :wacko: -- all over the place.  Actually, Heatherwick may have gotten the idea when Atlanta gave away its flame when it invited the 17 previous Summer host cities to pick up a piece of the 1996 Flame from special lanterns and torches at the Athens airport before the '96 flame flew to Los Angeles.  And Atlanta in turn was inspired by Lillehammer 1994 sending part of its Morgedahl flame to Minot, North Dakota, where Sondre Nordheim is buried.  

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I wasn't able to watch the ceremony this year (only caught the last hour live) but am looking for a place where I can view the full event, especially the cultural part at the start. Does anyone know of a place or web link where I can see it? I'm based in Canada so preferably a site that can be streamed in Canada.

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6 minutes ago, Kenadian said:

I wasn't able to watch the ceremony this year (only caught the last hour live) but am looking for a place where I can view the full event, especially the cultural part at the start. Does anyone know of a place or web link where I can see it? I'm based in Canada so preferably a site that can be streamed in Canada.

CBC

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4 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

Actually, Heatherwick may have gotten the idea when Atlanta gave away its flame when it invited the 17 previous Summer host cities to pick up a piece of the 1996 Flame ...

Oh dear, I've led us a bit off-topic, but never mind. As I suggested a few years ago, close examination of the 2013-4 "cauldron plagiarism" claim indicates that from 2007 LOCOG were looking for practical alternatives to the "Friend Ship" they had promised in the bid- a literal sailing ship visiting as many nations as possible between 2008 and 2012 and exchanging "cultural gifts".

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28 minutes ago, JMarkSnow2012 said:

Oh dear, I've led us a bit off-topic, but never mind. As I suggested a few years ago, close examination of the 2013-4 "cauldron plagiarism" claim indicates that from 2007 LOCOG were looking for practical alternatives to the "Friend Ship" they had promised in the bid- a literal sailing ship visiting as many nations as possible between 2008 and 2012 and exchanging "cultural gifts".

I was thinking more of the zeitgeist of "peeling off a piece of the flame and giving it as a 'take-home' keepsake --which the little-known Atlanta '96 exercise was.  While I'm sure it was covered in the Athens press and IOC press at the time, I've only seen mentioned in Atlanta Official Records of the Games -- but I have seen the special miners lamp and commemorative torches given at the event, put up for auction -- only 20 miners' lamps for that were made (spares to ACOG and the IOC Museum) and only 44 torches.  

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12 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

Hard to judge "best" of cauldrons.  They are really of different schools.  Here's my take on a few of the more outstanding cauldrons:

PC 2018 - totally unimaginative and predictable 

London 2012 - beautiful when first lit, but too difficult to create -- and where is it now?  :blink: 

Barcelona 1992 - was memorable NOT because of the cauldron which was meh!  but because of the flying arrow that was used to light it. 

Sydney 2000 - breathtaking when it first rose from the waters; but after getting stuck - trying too hard.   This and Barcelona still top the "where did they hide?/how will they light it" category!  

Vancouver 2010 - another "trying too hard" category 

Rio 2016 - that was NOT a cauldron.  It was an attachment to the back of one, like an earring just reflecting the flame in the simple bowl in front.  Wasn't even an original design--off the rack of Anthony Howe's catalogue. Take away the damn sculpture and you still had the bowl in front of you.

Athens 2004 - That was all they could come up with?  A reed?  :blink:  And only because it was all that could fit into that space. But "cauldron" consistent with its torch design.  

Atlanta 1996 - A total, UGLY disappointment! 

Beijing 2008 - another of those TRYING TOO HARD to impress.  Also, 

Torino 2006 - beautiful design but WAY TOO HIGH for anyone to relate to.  

Salt Lake 2002 - Nice design; not too ostentatious.   The best to manifest the theme of its Games - Light the Fire Within.  

Tokyo 2020ne is a nice design; modest  but where will it end up?  

I think LARGEST CARBON FOOTPRINT and biggest WASTER of natural gas:
1.  Beijing 2008 (of course, it's China)
2.  Vancouver 2010 (out in the harbor no less) 
3.  Atlanta 1996 
- Just wait until India gets a shot at having its own cauldron!! :lol:

Torino and Salt Lake were probably the last 2 which fulfilled the IOC's Charter of what a cauldron should be (which was written for a Summer Games, not a Winter Games). 
 

And Seoul has the distinction of being the only BBQ cauldron. :blink::rolleyes:

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17 hours ago, Kenadian said:

I wasn't able to watch the ceremony this year (only caught the last hour live) but am looking for a place where I can view the full event, especially the cultural part at the start. Does anyone know of a place or web link where I can see it? I'm based in Canada so preferably a site that can be streamed in Canada.

NHK uploaded full video,but I am not sure it's available in your region.

https://sports.nhk.or.jp/olympic/highlights/content/1feb8382-e3e5-4498-9bac-e250086c102e/

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19 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

Yeah, it's like "spreading your seed" to the winds :wacko: -- all over the place.  Actually, Heatherwick may have gotten the idea when Atlanta gave away its flame when it invited the 17 previous Summer host cities to pick up a piece of the 1996 Flame from special lanterns and torches at the Athens airport before the '96 flame flew to Los Angeles.  And Atlanta in turn was inspired by Lillehammer 1994 sending part of its Morgedahl flame to Minot, North Dakota, where Sondre Nordheim is buried.  

So that must be where Melbourne got it's Atlanta torch. The Australian Sports Museum has every Summer torch except Helsinki 1952.

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47 minutes ago, Lord David said:

So that must be where Melbourne got it's Atlanta torch. The Australian Sports Museum has every Summer torch except Helsinki 1952.

Probably so.  But it's only one of 44 made for that give-away; and it's different from the "official" one used in the Relay and by Ali. 

Re Helsinki '52 torch, only 22 were made; only 3 are in private hands -- and the last one sold at auction in May 2015, went for $545,000, the highest price ever paid for an Olympic torch in an open, public auction -- and is still the record to date.  

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Music used for the last scene (fireworks finale) was Symphony No. 2 at Terra by Takashi Yoshimatsu (starting at 31:11). They're a known classical composer in Japan. Fans of Osamu Tezuka might recognize him for composing the soundtrack of 2003 Astro Boy.

 

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