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baron-pierreIV

Tokyo 2020 Ceremonies

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Reminder that Beijing 2008, despite it ended using mostly national talents, they did hired Steven Spielberg as a consultant for the Opening Ceremony. Then he resigned earlier that year due to his criticism to China meddling in the Darfour Conflict in Sudan. 

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On 3/3/2018 at 7:13 AM, Ikarus360 said:

Baron, if you actually did read my posts well you would realize the only actual animated thing Yamazaki did was Stand by Me. He often works as a live action director. 

Yamazaki, . . Miyazaki . . . harakiri  . . .  Kamakura - It's all Japanese-Greek to me!  ;-)   I mistook Yamazaki for Miyazaki.  :wacko: 

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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2 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

Yamazaki, . . Miyazaki . . . harakiri  . . .  Kamakura - It's all Japanese-Greek to me!  ;-)   I mistook Yamazaki for Miyazaki.  :wacko: 

Considering how Miyazaki hates Shinzo Abe for his plans of abandoning Japan's pacifist position, I always doubted they would consider him or Ghibli. 

That reminds me, Miyazaki has a poor relationship with Yamazaki because of the "The Eternal Zero" movie for what he called a glorification of war and Kamikaze pilots. 

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I'm hoping they take a similar approach that Beijing 2008 took with their ceremonies. I know they had Nagano in 1998, but that was so long ago, and quite boring. I would love some Japanese history with it, I would really love to see how they go about addressing the atomic bombs and WW2. From what I've read, Tokyo 1964 was geared towards that, and a big part of those Games was to show the world that Japan had bounced back, but I think with new technology, it could be an amazing presentation of their history. Either the bombs, or their ancient history. Obviously, not the entire OC should be geared towards history, but an OC focused solely on technology and the future could end up being somewhat of a drag. I know Japan will run circles around Korea though, and by the looks of Beijing 2022's handover, they will leave big shoes for China to fill as well.

 

Just a thought.

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1 hour ago, anthonyliberatori said:

I'm hoping they take a similar approach that Beijing 2008 took with their ceremonies. I know they had Nagano in 1998, but that was so long ago, and quite boring. I would love some Japanese history with it, I would really love to see how they go about addressing the atomic bombs and WW2

Ugh, terrible.

That crap has been beaten to death and legitimately the last thing I want to see at the OC. I really don't feel like being preached or talked down to. I've had enough of that crap already.

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I'm ok with some history/folk stuff but as long as they dont make it too boring or focus solely on it. Also the Hiroshima thing has been done to death already. I'm sure Japan already did something when they hosted the 1994 Asian Games in said city back in the day. Now that we know Shina Ringo is also part of the team, I think it is very clear the direction they want to take is similar to that of the handover.

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8 minutes ago, Faiyez said:

Ugh, terrible.

That crap has been beaten to death and legitimately the last thing I want to see at the OC. I really don't feel like being preached or talked down to. I've had enough of that crap already.

Who said they would talk down to or preach to anybody? They could address the boom of a culture and economy without putting anybody down. They don't even have to mention the atomic bombs by name. With Rio, they used their favelas, neighborhoods ridden with poverty, crime, and lack of access to water and electricity, as a medium to showcase the birth of modern Brazilian rap and dance. Who says Japan can't have something with music/dance/some sort of culture "rising" from nothing into a huge, grandiose skeptical, implying a birth of a new Japan after the bombs, without ever directly saying "hey y'all, the Americans bombed us over 60 years ago, let's tell you about it as if you haven't heard it many times before"?

 

Whether or not it makes Americans uncomfortable, it's still a big part of the history and development of their country as we know it today. I wouldn't be surprised if it's brought up or implied at some point during the ceremony. 

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Well, Tokyo 1964 already acknowledged it by having the final torchbearer being born on the day the bomb was dropped. Whether that precludes another mention, who knows? But it’s certainly something that could be up for some role.

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Also the probable director of the Opening already got in a big scandal for the The Eternal Zero movie (was accussed by some, even Hayao Miyazaki himself of glorifying wartime era Japan). I doubt the last thing he wants is to make any kind of whitewashing to something which still brings sour grapes to Japan's closest neighbours. 

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2020 will be the first time since London that Olympic ceremonies have taken place in an athletics stadium- the performance spaces have effectively been shrinking. Will we see a return to 10,000 volunteer casts?

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/\  And I think Vancouver was almost as large as Sochi's.  And Albertville was a little bigger than YeongPChang.  10,000/  God forbid.  It should be at least 20,000! 

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Sometimes not having too much field helps improving the overall performance and not making it feel like there are many empty spaces. Maybe Tokyo will try innovating with a different kind of stage like London did. 

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I wholeheartedly disagree, but since L.A. did it first I wouldn't mind if we see jetpacks again in the next L.A. games.

And you don't need to tell me it's technically not a jetpack. I know and the concept is still the same.

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3 hours ago, Faiyez said:

I wholeheartedly disagree, but since L.A. did it first I wouldn't mind if we see jetpacks again in the next L.A. games.

And you don't need to tell me it's technically not a jetpack. I know and the concept is still the same.

You can disagree for all I care.  I'm just throwing it out there.  Yes, and I know LA did it first.   But ...why am I evne arguing with you.  I still don't like you. 

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Olympics: "Requiem and rebirth" will be theme of Tokyo 2020: team

 

KYODO NEWS KYODO NEWS -

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The newly-appointed creative directors of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics opening and closing ceremonies said on Tuesday spectators will see a mix of traditional and modern Japanese culture.

An acclaimed actor of traditional Japanese kyogen comic theater, chief executive creative director Nomura Mansai, aims to portray Japan's recovery from disaster to a global audience under a theme of "requiem and rebirth."

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(From left: Takashi Yamazaki, Nomura Mansai, Hiroshi Sasaki)

"First and foremost, this is a Games for reconstruction, to show that people have suffered from conflicts and events in our recent past," Mansai told reporters at a press conference a day after his appointment.

"We will keep the ceremony simple while honoring and expressing the spirit of Japan."

Mansai said the eight creative directors -- three executive members and five Tokyo 2020 team members -- will share expertise in their respective fields as they work together to craft visuals for the Olympics and Paralympics.

Film director Takashi Yamazaki and ad agency creative director Hiroshi Sasaki join Mansai on the production team.

"I'm from the classic performing arts, so a lot of it may be based on my own personal sense as a kyogen actor," Mansai said.

"But the diversity of these leading figures in their own respective industries will be key. Each person has great talent and they are a wonderful group of people -- we cannot do without any one of them."

When asked how the creative team would accomplish their expansive goal with less than two years to go, Mansai was reluctant to give details but said the ceremonies will touch on themes such as recovery and humility in the wake of the March 2011 disaster.

But Mansai emphasized that the ceremonies will not feature iconic examples of Japanese culture for their own sake, but will emphasize similarities with other cultures around the world.

"Kyogen and kabuki are well-recognized Japanese traditional arts, but there are many other arts Japan has to offer. I don't think we should include something just because it represents Japan, but because it has some purpose," Mansai said.

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(2020 Tokyo Olympics mascot Miraitowa)

With Mansai at the helm for all four ceremonies, Yamazaki will head up the Olympic creative team for the event's opening ceremony on July 24, 2020.

"I want people to feel, 'Yes, this is Japan' -- not just superficially, but that they recognize how we tried to approach and express things that are very Japanese," said Yamazaki, best known for his film series "Always -- Sunset on Third Street."

Yamazaki said he also intends to put just as much of his focus on the Aug. 9 closing ceremony, which will be key in transitioning to the Paralympic Games.

"When people look back on the four ceremonies, it's important that they feel that Tokyo took great care of the Paralympic Games, so transitioning nicely between the Olympics and Paralympics is a must," said Yamazaki.

"Most people think that after the Olympics the celebration is over, but hopefully we can change the mindset of people and maintain that continuity through to the Paralympic Games in order to emphasize them just as much."

In order to do so, Yamazaki will work closely with Sasaki, who will oversee the Paralympics opening ceremony on Aug. 25 and the Sept. 6 closing ceremony, which also acts as a closer for the entire Tokyo 2020 event.

Sasaki, who was in charge of the flag handover at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics closing ceremony, where Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appeared dressed as video game character Mario, said he wants to combine tradition with cutting-edge technology.

"I want to do something that will make people think 'Japan is so cool, Tokyo is different,'" said Sasaki, who has worked on high-profile television advertising campaigns for companies like SoftBank.

The 63-year-old also said he wants to use the opportunity to change the hearts and minds of Japanese people towards those with disabilities.

"The ceremonies can be an opportunity to send a message of unity to people," Sasaki said. "The recognition that para sports are cool and stylish, that's something I would like to see people associate with the Paralympic Games and para athletes."

Other creative directors include film writer and producer Genki Kawamura, creative producer Yoshie Kurisu, singer-songwriter Ringo Sheena, creative technologist Kaoru Sugano, and choreographer Mikiko, who was also involved in Japan's portion of the Rio closing ceremony.

According to chief ceremony officer Hajime Nakai, the creative team is now advancing into the directing and producing stage of their plan after finalizing a basic framework. Nakai said the team aims to create ceremonies with "great social significance."

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2018/07/c80ba1ae46d2-olympics-tokyo-2020-creative-team-to-showcase-japanese-spirit.html

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Wait, so Yamazaki won't be the director of the Opening? I know it was a strong rumour behind doors, but I wonder if not picking him in the end had anything to do with the fact Yamazaki did the highly controversial Eternal Zero movie which pissed off many in their neighbour countries. 

The mix of traditional and modern things seems pretty good to me. As much as we loved the hi-tech handover of 2016, it would be a bit repetitive to make an opening exclusively dedicated to it. Just as it was making Nagano '98 ceremonies being only traditional stuff. Here's hoping they finally manage to balance both.

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i think the focus of fukushima will dampen the WW2 sentiments. it will still focus on nukes but it's a natural disaster rather than man made or an act of war. 

 less focus on stereotypical japan would mean that there will be no ninjas or geisha but i also think less focus on amine culture. 

my only wish is world order is involve. may be even ushering in the the athletes 

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This was actually one month ago but since no one posted it here I might as well do it. The budget for the ceremonies was increased. We also have the official costs for the show.

https://www.insidesport.co/tokyo-olympics-opening-closing-ceremonies-to-cost-43-more-report/

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Tokyo Olympics opening closing ceremonies to cost 43% more: Report

Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games opening and closing ceremonies cost has been up by 43 per cent. The projected cost of the two mega events was released by the Tokyo 2020 organising committee.

The organizers of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games today (Friday) increased the budget for the opening and closing ceremonies roughly 43 percent to 13 billion yen ($117 million).

Tokyo 2020 Games chief executive Toshiro Muto has told executive committee members today (Friday) that the cost for the two events will be budgeted at 13 billion yen ($118 million). The initial cost for the opening and closing ceremonies were project to be 9.1 billion yen ($82 billion) when the Games were awarded to Tokyo six years ago.

Tokyo 2020 Organising Committee, however, opines the cost is still reasonable. “Using London Olympics spending as a model, I think this is the minimum we need to spend to get the job done,” Muto said and added the privately funded operating budget of 600 billion yen ($5.5 billion) would be unchanged. He said there was a reserve fund for such increases.

With the Tokyo Games already facing tough financial choices, the organizers decided to keep the budget for the ceremonies smaller than that for the 2012 London Olympics ($144 million) and the 2024 Paris Games ($134 million).

The opening and closing ceremonies for the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics will have traditional Japanese theatre actor Mansai Nomura as the chief creative director.

Overall, Tokyo is spending at least $20 billion to ready the city for the Olympics. Excluding the operating budget, the rest comes from the national, city and regional governments.

The committee will, however, consider reducing spending in other areas in the budget and dipping into adjustment funds.

At the same meeting, Japanese Olympic Committee President Tsunekazu Takeda apologized for “causing worry” after being investigated by French authorities for corruption in connection with Tokyo’s hosting bid, according to Japanese news agency Kyodo.

Takeda is under investigation over some $2 million in payments made by Japan’s bid committee in 2013 to now-defunct Singapore-based consultancy Black Tidings.

 

So, pretty much, a budget lower than London's but still far bigger than Rio's (which was around the numbers of 55$). I think the number is pretty decent and i'm sure the japanese will make good use to it to put on a good show.

Also, I know it's kind of early to make theories about the Opening, but take a close look at the diagonal structures on the field in this recent picture.

photo.jpg

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