Jump to content

New terrorist attacks in Paris


Recommended Posts

I really would prefer our French GB members here to give us updates and their feelings...

I may be on the other side of the world BUT France is considered a true Ally to New Zealand...We have spilt blood together fighting - oh well let's see now... <_<

French was and still is taught in our schools as the main secondary language followed by mandarin. We consider France a champion of liberty and justice sometimes over and above Great Britain, and the still play a role helping out in the Pacific with aid and disaster relief.

As for my comment about the influx of refugees and the potental of troublemakers slipping in - prehaps I should have added "may possibly have" to my sentence...Yes home grown and nertured terrorists exist and Im not forgetting that...But it's the growing evil ISIS octopus who's tenticles are now reaching into the West that now scares me... :mellow:

The trouble is that ISIS is made up of many westerners who have defected to it in order to become Jihadists. Many of those westerners come from France which gives them special knowledge of that country and the way its security works. It makes France particularly vulnerable to attacks of this sort as we have just witnessed coupled with the Charlie Hebdo attack last January.

The problem of home-grown Jihadists and terrorists is a major problem for all Western countries. It is a problem that urgently needs to be addressed but cannot be solved quickly. In the meantime, we have to step up our security and be ever-vigilant without destroying too much of our own freedoms and liberties in the process. A difficult and delicate balancing act for even the most astute politicians.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 71
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Ok. I'm having issues to express how I feel. I actually live 15 metres from the Bataclan, where 82 people died. Thankfully, I was at some friends' when it happened. But when I came home this morning,

So you know already that the attackers were terrorists from Syria pretending to be refugees? May I remind you that the Charlie Hebdo attacks came from long-time residents of France. Your message is e

And your evidence is? Sitting in far away NZ with no daily experience of the situation here makes it easy to come up with such simplistic statements or what? I'm very upset about what happened last ni

I've read that a Syrian passport used to enter Greece was recovered from one of the Muslim terrorist, if this is confirmed it would not be great news.


maybe that guy just found or took that passport from someone.

A Greek government official revealed the man, who died in the seige on the French capital, had passed through the southern European country last month.

A passport was found near the body of the gunmen, revealed he arrived in mainland Europe from the Greek island of Leros, suggesting he arrived in there by boat.

It has been revealed the man was one of the suicide bombers at the Stade de France.

Citizen Protection Minister Nikos Toskas, in charge of police forces in Greece, has released the following statement: "On the case of the Syrian passport found at the scene of the terrorist attack, we announce that the passport holder had passed from Leros on October 3 where he was identified based on EU rules.

Edited by paul
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok. I'm having issues to express how I feel. I actually live 15 metres from the Bataclan, where 82 people died. Thankfully, I was at some friends' when it happened. But when I came home this morning, the place hadn't been cleaned yet. On the floor there were shoes, coats, plastic gloves, napkins, all covered in blood. I will never forget.

I would like you guys to wait a little before jumping to conclusions. But let me be clear: what happned yesterday has NOTHING to do with the refugee crises. Nothing. Don't forget that what happened in January was done by 3 French guys, born and raised in France.

Merci.

JO2024 - please be careful! It wasn't attack at Paris/France only, but at our liberties, equality, brotherhood of our democracies...

We should keep in mind that the refugees, who are fleeing to Europe trying to escape exactly this terror - which we faced yesterday in Paris

Link to post
Share on other sites

Earlier this year, I travelled through Paris while heading to Madrid, where a long-time friend of mine now lives, just a few weeks after the Charlie Hebdo atrocities. I remember seeing two officers on patrol around Gare d'Austerlitz armed with automatic weapons and feeling a sense of reassurance that they were there. Last night, I was enjoying a boxing event when I saw the first reports of shootings in Paris on my phone.

Immediately, my heart just sank. Having felt the resilience of that city, even if only briefly, a few months ago, the fact they are having to endure so much worse now just fills me with despair and anger. Despair at the sheer scale of our species' potential inhumanity to each other and anger at these bastards who wish to destroy our way of life. It is entirely right that those of us who can should gather at Wembley on Tuesday night to stand alongside our French friends and show the scum who celebrate these atrocities that they will never win. And let next summer's European Championship be a memorial to those who perished last night, not just as a feast of football but as a celebration of what is best about humanity.

Of course, there are serious questions that must be addressed about what has happened and why. There are, for instance, reports in the British media this evening that one of the attackers was registered as a refugee in Greece last month. That, and others, are issues that must be addressed, though not right now. For tonight, we are all Parisian and we must stand together in this incredibly dark hour.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Earlier this year, I travelled through Paris while heading to Madrid, where a long-time friend of mine now lives, just a few weeks after the Charlie Hebdo atrocities. I remember seeing two officers on patrol around Gare d'Austerlitz armed with automatic weapons and feeling a sense of reassurance that they were there. Last night, I was enjoying a boxing event when I saw the first reports of shootings in Paris on my phone.

Immediately, my heart just sank. Having felt the resilience of that city, even if only briefly, a few months ago, the fact they are having to endure so much worse now just fills me with despair and anger. Despair at the sheer scale of our species' potential inhumanity to each other and anger at these bastards who wish to destroy our way of life. It is entirely right that those of us who can should gather at Wembley on Tuesday night to stand alongside our French friends and show the scum who celebrate these atrocities that they will never win. And let next summer's European Championship be a memorial to those who perished last night, not just as a feast of football but as a celebration of what is best about humanity.

Of course, there are serious questions that must be addressed about what has happened and why. There are, for instance, reports in the British media this evening that one of the attackers was registered as a refugee in Greece last month. That, and others, are issues that must be addressed, though not right now. For tonight, we are all Parisian and we must stand together in this incredibly dark hour.

Great post, arwebb. Well said!

Link to post
Share on other sites

This, in my mind, is the most significant world event since 9/11. The sheer size and potential implications are unbelievable, as is the way this event has shaken everyone to the core.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pope Francis didn't shied away from using terms like World War 3. Also an analysis from La Vanguardia implied the frustration a part of the inmigrant sector in France felt towards the alleged treatment they received was exploited by IS to recruit them (since one of the attackers was born in France. So much for the paranoia about the refugees).

And of course, Donald effin Trump had to politize his campaign and used the Paris incident on his speech today.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is very complicated. It is awful that the French capital has had to experience such violence and hatred once again. But it is not surprising that France is a target. France is the epicenter of the difficultly of having Muslim immigrants and how to include them in society while maintaining your own culture and way of life. It is a clash of how people view themselves and becoming apart of a new society. Who is to blame for the marginalization of immigrants? It is not an easy answer. How do you prevent youth from different, minority cultural backgrounds from feeling they are marginalized and not apart of larger society? Why is it so much more difficult to naturalize Muslims compared to how Caribbean, Indian and Chinese communities have become apart of the fabric of many Western countries.

How do you combat ISIS in Syria while not repeating the mistakes of Somalia, Afghanistan and Iraq? Is it the West's place to intervene in Syria even though it is ISIS's primary target. Should it not be Egypt, Saudi Arabia and other Muslim nation's responsibility to help their kin out in Syria? Or are some too busy funding the intolerance to see the damage it is causing?

This attack raises many, many questions. None of them have simple answers. We are dealing with a situation where there are multiple sides and various interests at play. Even between Allies. How Turkey would like to see the Syrian conflict conclude is different then how most of Western Europe and Canada/USA would like to see it be resolved.

Link to post
Share on other sites

At least 100 killed in there, but there were possibly over 200 total in the venue alone.

G20 summit in Turkey is supposed to be this week. That Paris thing is a climate change conference and is taking place the end of November.

There is also the APEC Summit in Manila with Obama, Putin, the China guy and 18 other Pacific Rim leaders. That's Nov 18-21. And then after that is the UN Climate Change conference in Paris -- but I think, w/o heads of state.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
Link to post
Share on other sites

New post: THE CURSE OF DE MOLAY?

Was Friday's cowardly massacres of scores of innocent lives in Paris part of the curse of Jacques de Molay of the Knights Templar? Philippe IV of France had the Knights Templars rounded up on Friday, October 13, 1307, their leaders tortured and framed with all sorts of lies and slander, and de Molay was burned alive at the stake. In his dying moments, de Molay put a curse on Philippe and his heirs. The over 120+ deaths of 2 days ago occurred on Friday the 13th, 608 years later! Is there a connection? Where is Nostradamus when you need him?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ Baron, he cursed the King of France, his royal house and the Pope according to the story. The two of them died one year after Molay was executed and the Capetian Royal house died off 14 years later. Its incredible its 2015 and some people are still using things like curses and magic to explain events.

Oh, right, then I remember some people still murder innocents in the name of religion to this day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Much to agree with here.....at the very least this is an antidote to the thoughtless feel-good platitudes I've seen floating around Twitter and Facebook recently.....

I want to thank well-meaning non-Muslims who, in the wake of these attacks, have emphasised that they have been carried out by a small, twisted minority. A terrorist's goal is to sow hatred and discord, and by not giving in, you are defeating their plans.

But I want to say that as a Muslim, I wish that we weren't so quick to emphasise that this has nothing to do with us. While I personally have never killed anyone and none of my friends and family have ever resorted to violence, radicalism has everything to do with Islam. And the failure to address that out of a well-intentioned commitment to tolerance is making the problem worse.

ISIS is a Muslim organisation, and it is an Islamic problem. Let me say it again to be perfectly clear. ISIS is a Muslim organisation, and they are a cancer at the heart of Islam. And the problem will not go away until Muslims confront that.

ISIS attackers scream 'Allah hu'akbar' during their attacks.

ISIS recruits cite Qur'anic verses as justification for the rape and enslavement of women.

ISIS soldiers kill archaeologists, gay men and women, and people who refuse to convert to Islam because they are blasphemers.

There are no Christians in ISIS. There are no Buddhists, Jews, Pagans, Taoists, Houngans, Catholics, Wiccans, Hindus or even Scientologists in ISIS. ISIS is a Muslim organisation and they kill in the name of Islam.

So don't say that ISIS aren't 'true Muslims' or that they are 'not really Muslims'. Like any large organisation, ISIS exists in a spectrum. You have the aimless, restless teenager who never amounted to anything in his life and traveled to Syria because he can't find a job and doesn't know if the Qur'an is to be read from left to right or right to left. But you also have pious professionals, businessmen, and academics who read their Qur'an cover to cover, pray every day, were seduced into radicalism, and truly believe that the Islamic State's goal of conquest is a noble one. The so-called 'Caliph' Abu Bakr Al-Baghdadi has a doctorate in Islamic studies.

So if you feel that Muslims are being oppressed or killed in Muslim countries, I expect you to also be just as outraged by ISIS. Because they have killed more Muslims in Iraq, Syria and Jordan than the entire US army. They have done more damage to the name and reputation of Islam than any Western nation. ISIS is Islam's biggest enemy, not the US, not Israel or France or Germany or the Russians.

We have to own the problem. We have to admit that this is a religious problem, and we need to renew our commitment to a secular country which treats all religions equally. I have believed in the importance of secularism all my life, and with every day that passes that belief grows stronger. Religion is no way to govern a nation. Not any religion, and not any nation.

ISIS is not America's problem, nor the British, nor the French. ISIS is not Syria or Iraq's problem. [ << not sure I agree with this sentence] ISIS is a problem for Muslims. And if you can't admit that, you're not really a good Muslim either.

https://www.facebook.com/sulaiman.daud.503/posts/10153827144425955?fref=nf&pnref=story

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there is a lot to agree with there. The Muslim community supports ISIS at some level, or it would not exist. It is funded heavily by Gulf Arabs, it is an ideological off-shoot of Saudi interruptions of Islam. It is an extreme off-shoot of the insular and intolerant Islam that is the Wahhabi School. And also fueled by the continued sectarian divides between Sunni and Shai Islam. Almost a century of progressive secularism is being eroded in Turkey because of the growth of Islamification and a once secularized Libya has descended into a sectarian, tribal mess after less then 5 years.

The inability of moderates and progressives to have a voice in Islamic society is at the heart of this problem. Too much money and influence is tied up in strongly conservative, intolerant, narrow views of Islam.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Therefore, it is ALL of Islam. We (everyone) gets caught up in the various fine grades if islam -- but it is THE SAME CLOTH -- the same murderous mind and soul from which ISIS operates. So, all this distinguishing attempts between the non-violent strains of the F*cking cult who DON'T do anything anyway ...and the other end like ISIS, really amounts to nothing. They just are all a murdering breed...and the best solution is to eliminate thme or flood the ME with bacon fat!!

hitting+the+fan+the+good+wife.gif

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Much to agree with here.....at the very least this is an antidote to the thoughtless feel-good platitudes I've seen floating around Twitter and Facebook recently.....

https://www.facebook.com/sulaiman.daud.503/posts/10153827144425955?fref=nf&pnref=story

An awful lot of sense there. That needs to be shared widely, particularly among the world's political leaders.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have chosen to edit this post at Baron's request - the quoted post has been removed by the moderator.

I would sincerely hope that they are just as quick at removing the inflammatory responses that have been posted by Baron - however sadly that seems to be less of a priority.

Nonetheless I have screenshots and am happy to forward them on to any interested parties as it was a fantastically worded put down and quite frankly justified in the context posted.

Edited by thatsnotmypuppy
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read that a Syrian passport used to enter Greece was recovered from one of the Muslim terrorist, if this is confirmed it would not be great news.


maybe that guy just found or took that passport from someone.

A Greek government official revealed the man, who died in the seige on the French capital, had passed through the southern European country last month.

A passport was found near the body of the gunmen, revealed he arrived in mainland Europe from the Greek island of Leros, suggesting he arrived in there by boat.

It has been revealed the man was one of the suicide bombers at the Stade de France.

Citizen Protection Minister Nikos Toskas, in charge of police forces in Greece, has released the following statement: "On the case of the Syrian passport found at the scene of the terrorist attack, we announce that the passport holder had passed from Leros on October 3 where he was identified based on EU rules.

Seems fake/setup. Curious as to why a suicide bomber would bring a passport when he's preparing to die. Not to mention that it survived the blast and was located "near" the body but not on him.. Too many strange circumstances around it.

I think there is a lot to agree with there. The Muslim community supports ISIS at some level, or it would not exist. It is funded heavily by Gulf Arabs, it is an ideological off-shoot of Saudi interruptions of Islam. It is an extreme off-shoot of the insular and intolerant Islam that is the Wahhabi School. And also fueled by the continued sectarian divides between Sunni and Shai Islam. Almost a century of progressive secularism is being eroded in Turkey because of the growth of Islamification and a once secularized Libya has descended into a sectarian, tribal mess after less then 5 years.

The inability of moderates and progressives to have a voice in Islamic society is at the heart of this problem. Too much money and influence is tied up in strongly conservative, intolerant, narrow views of Islam.

You can't tarnish the whole Muslim Community and say they support ISIS at some level. We can equally blame the West for helping to create ISIS. Hell, Tony Blair came out and basically took blame for ISIS saying without the Iraq war it wouldn't have created this divide. Not to mention the West "supported" Iraq and other middle eastern nations until it was no longer of benefit to them. You can't just enter an area, cause a mega ton of **** like we (the west) did and then leave and expect everything to be alright. We are seeing the massive ramifications of the actions that occurred under Blair, Bush, Howard etc.

ISIS is a sick cult but they're twisted into believing it's their own version of Islam. We can't blame all of Islam for ISIS just like we can't blame the Christian church for the Westboro nutjobs or for that guy who killed 70 kids in Norway.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there is a lot to agree with there. The Muslim community supports ISIS at some level, or it would not exist. It is funded heavily by Gulf Arabs, it is an ideological off-shoot of Saudi interruptions of Islam. It is an extreme off-shoot of the insular and intolerant Islam that is the Wahhabi School. And also fueled by the continued sectarian divides between Sunni and Shai Islam. Almost a century of progressive secularism is being eroded in Turkey because of the growth of Islamification and a once secularized Libya has descended into a sectarian, tribal mess after less then 5 years.

The inability of moderates and progressives to have a voice in Islamic society is at the heart of this problem. Too much money and influence is tied up in strongly conservative, intolerant, narrow views of Islam.

gulf states have little incentive to fund ISIS, if they ever really did. in fact this very interesting atlantic article you might have already seen makes the case that ISIS sees the gulf states as bigger threats than the west, although they probably are guilty of funding them at the very least indirectly. that well seems to have dried up though.

It sees enemies everywhere around it, and while its leadership wishes ill on the United States, the application of Sharia in the caliphate and the expansion to contiguous lands are paramount. Baghdadi has said as much directly: in November he told his Saudi agents to “deal with the rafida [shia] first … then al-Sulul [sunni supporters of the Saudi monarchy] … before the crusaders and their bases.”
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have chosen to edit this post at Baron's request - the quoted post has been removed by the moderator.

I would sincerely hope that they are just as quick at removing the inflammatory responses that have been posted by Baron - however sadly that seems to be less of a priority.

Nonetheless I have screenshots and am happy to forward them on to any interested parties as it was a fantastically worded put down and quite frankly justified in the context posted.

Please send me a copy of the long one I created! I thought it was going to stick around longer but sadly it didn't lol

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...