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Toronto 2024 Still Very Alive But Undecided a Week Before IOC Deadline


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Reporting From Toronto, Canada – During a regularly scheduled meeting between Toronto Mayor John Tory and Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, discussions about a potential bid for the Olympic Games eluded any definite conclusions. “I can only say that I continue to be involved in a very intensive collection of both information and opinions that will allow […]

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Holes so they don't end up like Boston.

Ughh.. please tell me we're not now in a world where every bid that isn't rock solid will be compared to Boston? Which seems like it actually might be worse than comparing every potentially sub-standard bid to Atlanta.

We get it, Boston was a dumpster fire that blew up in very dramatic fashion. But can we not discuss future bids in the context of "well, they don't want to end up like Boston." any more than they don't want to be like Atlanta? No fuckingshit they don't want to end up like Boston.

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Ughh.. please tell me we're not now in a world where every bid that isn't rock solid will be compared to Boston? Which seems like it actually might be worse than comparing every potentially sub-standard bid to Atlanta.

We get it, Boston was a dumpster fire that blew up in very dramatic fashion. But can we not discuss future bids in the context of "well, they don't want to end up like Boston." any more than they don't want to be like Atlanta? No fuckingshit they don't want to end up like Boston.

Except I actually meant a direct "like Boston" scenario, not just general failiure. Like, they can look at Boston and think: What in the Boston scenario can we fix and apply to our plan so we don't fall into the same hole as them (eg. Support, legacy, suspicious motive), not simply "I hope we don't end up like Boston, so lets wait for some stuff to happen before officially announcing!"

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Except I actually meant a direct "like Boston" scenario, not just general failiure. Like, they can look at Boston and think: What in the Boston scenario can we fix and apply to our plan so we don't fall into the same hole as them (eg. Support, legacy, suspicious motive), not simply "I hope we don't end up like Boston, so lets wait for some stuff to happen before officially announcing!"

Thank you for illustrating my point for me. What similarities are there between the 2 that make them comparable? Why is Boston the start point for Toronto? We have a tendency here to look for and point out faults so more often than not, we're looking to set a baseline of the worst bid we can find. That's why I mentioned Atlanta. Boston's bid was broken from the start. Whose to say that Toronto's bid is broken and needs to be fixed?

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Thank you for illustrating my point for me. What similarities are there between the 2 that make them comparable? Why is Boston the start point for Toronto? We have a tendency here to look for and point out faults so more often than not, we're looking to set a baseline of the worst bid we can find. That's why I mentioned Atlanta. Boston's bid was broken from the start. Whose to say that Toronto's bid is broken and needs to be fixed?

No one, but if what intoronto saying is true about them "waiting for answers," then it's very plausible to assume they're waiting for some sort of exploratory results that most certainly would've taken what-not-to-do pointers from Boston.

Okay support and some sort of 'no Olympics' organization are about the only thing the two cities have in common, but even that has a huge gap between them. But you can't say that those two will not 100% for sure explode into to something bigger. They may, or they may not. I'm just saying that Toronto obviously doesn't want to end up with the concerns with Boston, so they probably are taking some sort of precaution against that. I'd see nothing wrong with Toronto taking precautions, but I guess the same could be said for every Olympic risk. However NoToronto is probably going to use Boston as a solid fuel source, so focusing the time on trying not to fail in that particular area may not be such a bad idea.

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Okay support and some sort of 'no Olympics' organization are about the only thing the two cities have in common, but even that has a huge gap between them. But you can't say that those two will not 100% for sure explode into to something bigger. They may, or they may not. I'm just saying that Toronto obviously doesn't want to end up with the concerns with Boston, so they probably are taking some sort of precaution against that. I'd see nothing wrong with Toronto taking precautions, but I guess the same could be said for every Olympic risk. However NoToronto is probably going to use Boston as a solid fuel source, so focusing the time on trying not to fail in that particular area may not be such a bad idea.

Ahh yes, the old "you can't say for sure" counter-point. Very popular here on GamesBids. When you say "they probably are taking some sort of precaution against that," what exactly is "that" referring to? Are you saying that Toronto is taking some precautions against fucking up? Yes, I agree that's a great. Toronto should focus on not fucking up. That would be a very smart strategy. I mean, that's a very unique issue for Toronto to try to not fail. Not a bad idea at all.

Okay, sarcasm aside here.. once again, this is why I brought up Atlanta. The tendency here is often to focus on the negative and say a bid shouldn't be like that. "Well, Atlanta had problems, so city X bidding for the 20?? Olympics should try not to be like them." It's a bad generalization. There are lessons to be learned from what happened with Boston, but a lot of that stemmed from incompetent leadership and a ton of mismanagement. Is that an actual concern with Toronto? Can you cite something specific that makes them comparable? What did Boston do that you think Toronto might do other than "fail"? As if - like you alluded to - that makes them different from any other prospective bidder.

As for NoToronto.. every bid has it's detractors. Even the ones that eventually win. This is not a unique problem for Toronto. These guys don't fuel off each other. The best bid (by whatever measures the IOC evaluates, and obviously a lot of those are intangibles) is the one that wins. I doubt Toronto's opposition gets any inspiration from Boston. Why should they? Boston's opposition is not what sunk the bid. Don't see it affecting Toronto's prospects either.

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As for NoToronto.. every bid has it's detractors. Even the ones that eventually win. This is not a unique problem for Toronto. These guys don't fuel off each other. The best bid (by whatever measures the IOC evaluates, and obviously a lot of those are intangibles) is the one that wins. I doubt Toronto's opposition gets any inspiration from Boston. Why should they? Boston's opposition is not what sunk the bid. Don't see it affecting Toronto's prospects either.

Okay, maybe "fueled " wasn't the right word, but there definitely is at least one reference on the NoTO2024 site:

Your voice matters! Boston walked away from its bid because they didn't have the public's support. You can make a difference by telling your politicians and your friends that the Olympic Games are the wrong way to build a better Toronto!

http://www.noto2024.ca/do-something.html

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As for NoToronto.. every bid has it's detractors. Even the ones that eventually win. This is not a unique problem for Toronto. These guys don't fuel off each other. The best bid (by whatever measures the IOC evaluates, and obviously a lot of those are intangibles) is the one that wins. I doubt Toronto's opposition gets any inspiration from Boston. Why should they? Boston's opposition is not what sunk the bid. Don't see it affecting Toronto's prospects either.

Boston's opposition is what sunk the bid though and Toronto's opposition is inspired by Boston.

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Boston's opposition is what sunk the bid though and Toronto's opposition is inspired by Boston.

No it's not. Poor planning and an ill-conceived bid is what sunk Boston. The final nail in the coffin may have been the mayor's public proclamation that he didn't want the taxpayers to be on the hook, but the No Boston Olympics contingent had little if anything to do with that. If they didn't even exist, the Boston organizers may very well have come to the same conclusion and scrapped the bid once they realized it wasn't such a great idea in the first place.

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