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Potential 2026 and 2028 bids

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On 2/16/2017 at 7:19 PM, anthonyliberatori said:

If Summer 2028 is not awarded to the loser of the LA/Paris 2024 battle, then I am not sure who I would root for. If LA were to be offered 2028 and not take it, and another US bid were to arise, I am not sure how I would feel. I feel if the US tries again for a summer games (all predicated upon LA not getting 2024), it should be an Atlanta kind of movement, where the plan is based on the renewal of professional and collegiate facilities for the new venues, in a city that is trying to be put on the world map. Cities like San Francisco, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Boston, Miami, Chicago, Dallas and Houston could have the potential. I would back any of these, as long as they had good economic and post-Games plans and could continue the positive legacy that Paris (Not LA because there would be a 2028 bid if LA has 2024) would definitely leave.

I don't think we will see another US city bid for the Olympics if Los Angeles loses. American cities spend too much on domestic sporting venues to be able to afford the cost of additional Olympic facilities. (Even Minneapolis could have built all of the Olympic venues for the cost of their two football stadiums.) New York is the only other viable city, but New York does not want the games.

Miami, Houston and Washington are also not suitable due to climate. It's not fair to the athletes to subject them to the risk of heat stroke competing in that much heat and humidity.

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20 hours ago, Nacre said:

I don't think we will see another US city bid for the Olympics if Los Angeles loses. American cities spend too much on domestic sporting venues to be able to afford the cost of additional Olympic facilities. (Even Minneapolis could have built all of the Olympic venues for the cost of their two football stadiums.) New York is the only other viable city, but New York does not want the games.

Miami, Houston and Washington are also not suitable due to climate. It's not fair to the athletes to subject them to the risk of heat stroke competing in that much heat and humidity.

If LA loses 2024, I fully expect them to go back at it for 2028.  The USOC may send out some feelers to see who else is interested, but I would venture a guess that they'll give LA the option to say yes or no before they start to engage any other cities and that will probably be the end of it.

1 point to make here though.. building facilities is not the problem.  It's finding uses for those facilities that needs to be accounted for.  Those 2 football stadiums will continue to see extensive use in Minneapolis.  Would the Olympic facilities they could have built instead for the same amount of money have generated the same revenue?  Unlikely.

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1 hour ago, Quaker2001 said:

Those 2 football stadiums will continue to see extensive use in Minneapolis.  Would the Olympic facilities they could have built instead for the same amount of money have generated the same revenue?  Unlikely.

Extensive? They get, what, 10 events a year? Public funding of football stadiums is also a huge boondoggle. The media loves to mock the Olympics with shots of rotting venues.. but doesn't apply the same scrutiny to football. Love this video of people playing golf inside the ruins of the Pontiac Silverdome.

 

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25 minutes ago, zekekelso said:

Extensive? They get, what, 10 events a year? Public funding of football stadiums is also a huge boondoggle. The media loves to mock the Olympics with shots of rotting venues.. but doesn't apply the same scrutiny to football. Love this video of people playing golf inside the ruins of the Pontiac Silverdome.

It's pretty creepy what has happened to the Silverdome now that it's literally just rotting away (although it would make a great shooting location for a post-apocalypse movie or TV show).  That said, during its lifespan, in addition to the Lions, they had the Pistons for a decade, hosted World Cup matches, had the one-time record for Wrestlemania attendance and probably more.

Here's the calendar of events for US Bank Stadium.  I count a hell of a lot more than 10 events on here, even if the calendar gets a little sparse once summer hits.. https://www.usbankstadium.com/events

Ditto for TCF Bank Stadium, home to Minnesota's MLS team. http://minneapolis.eventful.com/venues/tcf-bank-stadium-/V0-001-001978023-1

So yea, there's a lot more than 10 events per year in each.  Not going to disagree that football stadiums are rarely worth the public financing they receive, but that's really ignorant to compare a white elephant Olympic venue that may or may not have had a legacy plan in the first place to most of the billion dollar football stadiums build these days, especially when those teams/owners are always looking for events to fill them.

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6 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

1 point to make here though.. building facilities is not the problem.  It's finding uses for those facilities that needs to be accounted for.  Those 2 football stadiums will continue to see extensive use in Minneapolis.  Would the Olympic facilities they could have built instead for the same amount of money have generated the same revenue?  Unlikely.

It's not the facilities that are the problem, it is the public money spent on facilities. In the rest of the world teams generally have to spend their own money on stadiums and arenas, or they use modest public facilities. Only in North America (and somewhat in Australia) is "welfare for billionaires" provided for sports team owners and their stadiums.

Minnesota taxpayers have spent $350 million on a baseball stadium, $145 million on an NCAA football stadium, $498 million on an NFL stadium, $170 million on an NHL arena and $104 million on an NBA arena. Taxpayers in the UK meanwhile have spent/will spend nothing on the football stadiums for Arsenal, Chelsea, Spurs, etc.

Of course the best answer is to do what New York has done. If politicians were smart they would not waste taxpayer money on either an Olympic Park or NFL stadiums.

Edited by Nacre

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On 22/2/2017 at 9:27 PM, Nacre said:

I don't think we will see another US city bid for the Olympics if Los Angeles loses. American cities spend too much on domestic sporting venues to be able to afford the cost of additional Olympic facilities. (Even Minneapolis could have built all of the Olympic venues for the cost of their two football stadiums.) New York is the only other viable city, but New York does not want the games.

Miami, Houston and Washington are also not suitable due to climate. It's not fair to the athletes to subject them to the risk of heat stroke competing in that much heat and humidity.

The Olympics in New York would be very attractive. If LA doesn't get anything in September, 2028 would be the ideal time for New York to finally host. Such a pity they've shown so little interest so far.

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4 hours ago, Athan said:

The Olympics in New York would be very attractive. If LA doesn't get anything in September, 2028 would be the ideal time for New York to finally host. Such a pity they've shown so little interest so far.

What makes you think the Olympics in New York would be attractive and that 2028 is the ideal time for them?  I've lived in NYC since the day I was born and I'll happily play the part of the arrogant New Yorker who says this is the greatest city in the world.  But there's little about this city that's ideal for the Olympics and I certainly don't think less of New York because of that.  I've made the point many times that if Atlanta didn't get 1996, then around 2008/2012 when NY was going through a sports building boom would have been the ideal time.  That didn't work out though.  2028 is far from ideal for NY.  Where's the main stadium?  Where do they put the village?  This is why NYC has shown little interest in hosting the Olympics.  These things go hand in hand where if a city thinks they have a plan that can work well with the Olympics, we might see a bid.  In New York where no such vision exists, we won't see a bid.  You can't expect a city to show interest in spending billions of dollars unless they think it will benefit the city.  Very unlikely we'll see that with New York.

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16 hours ago, Nacre said:

It's not the facilities that are the problem, it is the public money spent on facilities. In the rest of the world teams generally have to spend their own money on stadiums and arenas, or they use modest public facilities. Only in North America (and somewhat in Australia) is "welfare for billionaires" provided for sports team owners and their stadiums.

Minnesota taxpayers have spent $350 million on a baseball stadium, $145 million on an NCAA football stadium, $498 million on an NFL stadium, $170 million on an NHL arena and $104 million on an NBA arena. Taxpayers in the UK meanwhile have spent/will spend nothing on the football stadiums for Arsenal, Chelsea, Spurs, etc.

Of course the best answer is to do what New York has done. If politicians were smart they would not waste taxpayer money on either an Olympic Park or NFL stadiums.

It's been well-established that publicly-financed stadiums provide little return to the citizens of that city, but let's not put an Olympic Park on the same level as an NFL stadium.  US Bank Stadium has been around less than a year, but they already have a Super Bowl and a Final Four on the calendar.  In addition to the Vikings, they have Gophers baseball, concerts, the X Games, and probably more I'm not even thinking of.  That's a world of difference from a city like Rio building an Olympic park with few plans on what those facilities might get used for after the Olympics.

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4 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

What makes you think the Olympics in New York would be attractive and that 2028 is the ideal time for them?  I've lived in NYC since the day I was born and I'll happily play the part of the arrogant New Yorker who says this is the greatest city in the world.  But there's little about this city that's ideal for the Olympics and I certainly don't think less of New York because of that.  I've made the point many times that if Atlanta didn't get 1996, then around 2008/2012 when NY was going through a sports building boom would have been the ideal time.  That didn't work out though.  2028 is far from ideal for NY.  Where's the main stadium?  Where do they put the village?  This is why NYC has shown little interest in hosting the Olympics.  These things go hand in hand where if a city thinks they have a plan that can work well with the Olympics, we might see a bid.  In New York where no such vision exists, we won't see a bid.  You can't expect a city to show interest in spending billions of dollars unless they think it will benefit the city.  Very unlikely we'll see that with New York.

I mean attractive for the worldwide audiences, for TV spectators and visitors during the Olympics, and probably also for the athletes and the rest of the Olympic Family. NYC is the "greatest city in the world", it'd be sort of an idyllic destination for the Olympics, as well as it is for many other things. Very few other cities in the world are as attractive as NYC is. As for the ideal time, I'm talking about geopolitics and all this stuff related to Olympic hosts. If Paris gets 2024 and with Africa unlikely to present a powerful bid, 2028 will more than probably go to North America (and that means the US if Canada gets 2026). Of course, geopolitics look good for any other US city too. And then, yes, I know NYC would need to build a stadium and a village and that those would be important challenges, but I was looking at it from that outside perspective.

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Quote

Erzurum emerges as contender for 2026 Winter Olympics
By Dan Palmer  Wednesday, 15 March 2017

Erzurum in Turkey has emerged as the latest possible contender for the 2026 Winter Olympics and Paralympics.

The city hosted the European Youth Olympic Winter Festival (EYOF) last month and the Winter Universiade in 2011.

A possible Olympic bid has been tipped by Mustafa Ilicak, a Turkish Member of Parliament from Erzurum province, which lies in the east of Turkey.

According to Turkish sports newspaper Fanatik, Ilicak will discuss the plan with the country's President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan who will visit the region on March 31.

"In September we will send a letter of intent and an application to the International Olympic Committee," he said.

Ilicak added that Erzurum could share some competition venues with the neighbouring provinces of Erzincan and Kars.

A high speed railway line is due to connect all three by 2023.

The Winter Universiade in the city reportedly resulted in an investment of TRY 1 billion (£220 million/$269 million/€253 million) into sporting infrastructure.

"It will be a great contribution to the economy of the country and region," Ilicak added.

Turkey previously bid unsuccessfully for the 2020 Summer Olympics, with Istanbul losing out to Tokyo.

Security would likely be the biggest concern about a Turkish bid, with a number of terrorist attacks rocking the country and a failed coup attempt last year.

Despite this, the EYOF went ahead as planned last month after organisers the European Olympic Committees received assurances the athletes would be safe.

The Festival then passed successfully without major incident.

However, the World Curling Federation did opt to move their World Junior Championships from Erzurum last year, with Danish capital Copenhagen stepping in.

If a 2026 campaign is launched, Turkey will likely face competition from Switzerland with a Sion bid set to be rubber-stamped on April 11.

Austrian city Innsbruck are also considering bidding for the 2026 Winter Olympics and could be joined by Japanese entrant Sapporo, host in 1972, and Canadian contender Calgary, where the Games were held in 1988.

Sweden are also investigating whether to bid or not, with the IOC scheduled to make a decision in 2019. 

Inside the games

 

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4 hours ago, Roger87 said:

After calling half of Europe "fascist nazis", Erdogan must be fully delusional if he thinks he will win for bid alone.

unless no bid from Europe and N. America cities or all of them withdraw from the candidacy process, then they may be awarded to host WOG 2026.

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16 hours ago, budse said:

unless no bid from Europe and N. America cities or all of them withdraw from the candidacy process, then they may be awarded to host WOG 2026.

With just another option that would be enough at this moment. Even Almaty can beat Erzurum.

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Sapporo 'ready now' for 2026 Winter Games: Japan Olympic chief
 

TOKYO: The Japanese city of Sapporo would not need to construct a single competition venue in a potential bid to host the 2026 Winter Games, Japan's top Olympic official said Friday (Jan 19).

Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC) president Tsunekazu Takeda said the snow-swept northern city could make use of existing venues from the 1972 Winter Olympics it staged, and the 1998 Games in Nagano - about 1,000km southwest of Sapporo - if it formally joins the bid race.

"It's ready to go," Takeda told AFP in an interview. "We would use all the facilities from the (1972) Sapporo Olympics. The sliding courses for bobsleigh and luge no longer exist, but we would use the Nagano tracks.

"We could also use the Sapporo Dome for the opening and closing ceremonies. There are no new (sports) venues we actually need to construct," he said, adding that the JOC would look to reduce Sapporo's initial budget estimate of around US$4 billion.

Sapporo is currently in the dialogue stage with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to explore the possibility of a bid which, if successful, would give Asia a third successive Winter Games after Pyeongchang next month and Beijing in 2022.

Cities allowed to advance to the candidature stage will be selected at an IOC board meeting in October, with the winner announced in September 2019.

 

"Asia hasn't previously had three Winter Olympics in a row of course," said Takeda, who first announced Sapporo's interest in staging the Games alongside city mayor Katsuhiro Akimoto last November.

"But after Pyeongchang, nobody expected Beijing to win the next vote - that was a real surprise, so we want to be prepared. All the venues are already in place to host the Games at any time."

Takeda, a former Olympic show jumper whose great-grandfather was the Emperor Meiji, insisted that Olympic fatigue would not be a factor six years after the 2020 Tokyo Games.

"If we wanted to host another Summer Olympics six years after nobody would agree, but the Winter Olympics is a totally different event," said the 70-year-old.

"We're told the approval rating among the citizens of Sapporo for an Olympic bid is very high," he added.

"Sapporo is a mecca for winter sports in Asia and last year it successfully hosted the Asian Winter Games. It would be a safe and totally reliable host city."

Sapporo, a city of two million on the northern Japanese island of Hokkaido, could face competition from Sion, Calgary and Stockholm, among others.

"We don't yet know what European cities will end up bidding but Sapporo would be an ideal candidate," said Takeda, underlining the city's credentials.

"Sapporo has always wanted to host the Olympics again and our aim is to be ready to host a Games, for the city and for the sake of the Olympic Movement too."

Source: AFP/zl
Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/sport/sapporo-ready-now-for-2026-winter-games-japan-olympic-chief-9876904

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Would they really want to award another Olympics to Asia for 2026? To be completely honest, I can only see Sapporo winning if a European or North American bid is awarded for 2026, and they are given the 2030 Olympics. The IOC has been worried for a while now about losing bids from Europe, so I personally, unless a groundbreaking Sapporo Olympic plan is unveiled and the US, Canadian, or Swiss economies take a huge turn, don't think they will award Sapporo an Olympics at this time. A strong bid from a European or North American country would likely look too good to pass up at this point in time, especially if it comes from countries like Austria, Switzerland and Sweden, which the IOC has had a hard time securing bids from over the past few years.

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Sapporo is arguably the Los Angeles of the Winter Games - a safe and ready host that can step in with little notice if required.

It will be a prefered host over a Kazakh/Turk etc bid. Even over an Eastern European bid.

Any North American or solid Western European bid would be preferred but may not eventuate.

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10 hours ago, thatsnotmypuppy said:

Sapporo is arguably the Los Angeles of the Winter Games - a safe and ready host that can step in with little notice if required.

It will be a prefered host over a Kazakh/Turk etc bid. Even over an Eastern European bid.

Any North American or solid Western European bid would be preferred but may not eventuate.

This is true. However, if the Calgary bid makes it all the way to the end, I do not think Sapporo could stand against it. The cost for both would be relatively similar, the last reports I've read being under 5M USD, but Canada has yet to stage a Winter Games that was unsuccessful, both fiscally and in terms of legacy. While the Sapporo 1976 Games proved successful, and the facilities were recently used again for the 2017 Asian Games, the Nagano Games in 1998 did not have quite the same legacy. It is obvious that the region did not get the tourist boom it hoped for, and that it suffered a net loss, but I once read that the documents that showed exactly how much money was lost was burned... So, in a time when the IOC doesn't want to take any chances to end up with another IOC session where the only host choices are in China and Kazakhstan, the smart choice here would be Calgary for 2026. Calgary 2026 continues to face different types of backlash, so if the city gets to the final round of voting, it would be stupid for the IOC not to go with Calgary, as they may not make it back to the final round for a very long time. If Sapporo is as reliable as you claim, it will come around again, especially in the wake of any success Tokyo 2020 may have. 

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14 hours ago, thatsnotmypuppy said:

Sapporo is arguably the Los Angeles of the Winter Games - a safe and ready host that can step in with little notice if required.

It will be a prefered host over a Kazakh/Turk etc bid. Even over an Eastern European bid.

Any North American or solid Western European bid would be preferred but may not eventuate.

 

Anything that's the something of the something isn't really the anything of anything.

LA is not ready to step in with little notice and neither is Sapporo.  Yes, it would probably be preferred over some Eastern European bids, although let's put the caveat in there that perhaps the IOC isn't so eager to award yet another Olympics to Asia.  Obviously they may not have that choice, but let's not paint the picture of them as a "ready to go" bid.  They have a lot they need to do in order to host a 21st Century Olympics.  Not to mention they're probably going to have to use Nagano's sliding track since they no longer have their own near Sapporo.

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"Little notice" in Olympic terms is a year or two - not next week.  So yes - LA and Sapporo with far smaller lead in times could host successful Games.

There has already been public reports that any Sapporo bid would use Nagano's track unless a temporary option was approved. Just remember - some within the IOC was pushing the Pyeongchang organisers to stage sliding events in Japan a few years back.  The IOC won't have an issue with Nagano. The sliding sports federations may though.

Sapporo's only real hurdle is a village and a speed skating track (though there is a world class one in Obihiro 190km away).  

Nonetheless as I said - 

On 31/01/2018 at 1:53 PM, thatsnotmypuppy said:

It will be a prefered host over a Kazakh/Turk etc bid. Even over an Eastern European bid.

Any North American or solid Western European bid would be preferred but may not eventuate.

 

Kazakhstan and Turkey would be Asian hosts.  Oh you can argue about Central or Western Asia - but that doesn't change the continent. So if faced with a 2022 situation (that could likely come to pass - Calgary is iffy, the USOC non-plussed and Europe.. well... we'll see) be prepared to hold onto those Japanese language guides.

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11 hours ago, thatsnotmypuppy said:

"Little notice" in Olympic terms is a year or two - not next week.  So yes - LA and Sapporo with far smaller lead in times could host successful Games.

There has already been public reports that any Sapporo bid would use Nagano's track unless a temporary option was approved. Just remember - some within the IOC was pushing the Pyeongchang organisers to stage sliding events in Japan a few years back.  The IOC won't have an issue with Nagano. The sliding sports federations may though.

Sapporo's only real hurdle is a village and a speed skating track (though there is a world class one in Obihiro 190km away).  

Nonetheless as I said - 

 

Kazakhstan and Turkey would be Asian hosts.  Oh you can argue about Central or Western Asia - but that doesn't change the continent. So if faced with a 2022 situation (that could likely come to pass - Calgary is iffy, the USOC non-plussed and Europe.. well... we'll see) be prepared to hold onto those Japanese language guides.

Not arguing the last point.  Sapporo may well be it if no one else can get their act together.  But I think there are more hurdles there than you're giving the situation credit for.  It's been noted that the scale of the 2017 Asian Games somewhat dwarfs that of the `72 Olympics.  But the 2026 Olympics would be a huge leap over the Asian games in terms of facilities and infrastructure needed.

And as for Los Angeles.. they're not as ready-made as some seem to want to think.  There's not a ton they have to do to get ready for an Olympics, but that's easier with a longer timeline than if they needed to go 2 years from now.  There's a $300 temporary overlay needed for the Coliseum.  They dorms are USC and UCLA aren't automatically available for use unless that's negotiated to make that work.  LA is the most prepared city for an Olympics we're likely to have seen in a while, Paris notwithstanding, but the idea that LA could step in on short notice - even a year or 2 - is not as accurate as it seems.

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