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Citius Altius Fortius

Rio Olympics and I

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After the wonderful London Olympics I decided to attend the Rio Olympics, too.

I am looking forward to another amazing experience - my second Olympic Games, my first time in South America!

I have rented an apartment in Rio - booked my flights - got tickets for some very interesting events (e.g. Rugby Sevens, Beach Volleyball or Diving)

Who of our GamesBids members will go to Rio also?

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I'll be there!!! Basketball in Olympic Park and Volleyball in Maracanazinho with a special GB Forums friend! That will be amazing!

Really excited here!

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I'll be there!!! Basketball in Olympic Park and Volleyball in Maracanazinho with a special GB Forums friend! That will be amazing!

Really excited here!

The most important thing at Olympic Games is to meet friends from around the world and share experiences - looking forward to the breathtaking city and the sports

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After the wonderful London Olympics I decided to attend the Rio Olympics, too.

I am looking forward to another amazing experience - my second Olympic Games, my first time in South America!

I have rented an apartment in Rio - booked my flights - got tickets for some very interesting events (e.g. Rugby Sevens, Beach Volleyball or Diving)

Who of our GamesBids members will go to Rio also?

Welcome :)

Bem-vindo :)

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Muito obrigado!

What does a carioca recommend to see/do in Rio, when you visit it for the first time (and you don't have a lot of time, due the sports event)?

For adventure: hang-gliding flight on the 'Pedra da Gávea' (Gavea Stone).

To know the contemporary Rio: the new 'Praça Mauá' (Maua square), currently under renovation, with the new Museum of Tomorrow and the new Rio Art Museum.

To know the nature of the city: a walk in the Tijuca National Park (or Tijuca Forest).

:)

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I have tickets for the following venues:

Maracanã

Maracanã
Olympic Stadium

Maracanãzinho

Barra
Rio Olympic Arena

Riocentro 2

Carioca Arena 4
Maria Lenk Aquatics Centre

Deodoro

Olympic Equestrian Centre

Whitewater Stadium
Deodoro Stadium

Olympic Hockey Centrum

Copacabana

Lagoa Stadium
Beach Volleyball Stadium

Edited by Citius Altius Fortius

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I'm sure I'll be there. My complete lack of tickets so far, plus some possible financial problems is putting a damper on my planning. But I do think it's going to be awesome. Rio looks amazing... it'll be my first trip to the Southern Hemisphere.

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We should plan a big GamesBids Forum meeting in Rio in the weekend (Aug 13th.) I'll be there in Rio and many of us will be there too. What you guys think?

We could go to some bar, to have some pastel and beer! It would be amazing.

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We should plan a big GamesBids Forum meeting in Rio in the weekend (Aug 13th.) I'll be there in Rio and many of us will be there too. What you guys think?

We could go to some bar, to have some pastel and beer! It would be amazing.

great idea - but I have an evening ticket on that day Edited by Citius Altius Fortius

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Great ideas - Pedra de Gavea is quite close to my apartment!

Is the Bonde de Santa Teresa running again? I would love to take it!

In fact, the hang-gliding flight is made ​​from 'Pedra Bonita' (next to the Pedra da Gávea), but there is a very cool trekking between the Pedra da Gávea and the Pedra Bonita (the real place for the hang-gliding flight). It's beautiful. People love it.

trekking_rio.jpg

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Not even close.

That's really a pity I would love to ride on the tram

In fact, the hang-gliding flight is made ​​from 'Pedra Bonita' (next to the Pedra da Gávea), but there is a very cool trekking between the Pedra da Gávea and the Pedra Bonita (the real place for the hang-gliding flight). It's beautiful. People love it

My apartment is in Ipanema (close to the Linha 1 station) - I suppose it is quite easy to get to Pedra Bonita

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After London I thought to myself, I'm not going to attend Rio, I've seen everything I needed to see at an Olympic Games (100 metre final, Basketball final, Australian winning a gold medal).

But since London there was always that lingering thought in the back of mind that I would love to head to Rio for the OG. In the last few months that thought has grown into a dream, then a goal and turned into a plan. I have some tickets purchased and accommodation booked and over the next few months I will organise my flights. In my mind the Olympic Games are just this magical moment in time when athletes and fans congregate from around the world, to witness incredible displays of athleticism and comraderie.

Cannot wait for next August!

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Boa tarde!

I started to learn some Portuguese yesterday to prepare myself for my Rio Olympics trip to Brasil next year - I would like to ask our Brazilian members about some practical recommendations/informations:

1. I rented an apartment in Ipanema and I need to buy food in supermarkets - what are the best known supermarket chains in Rio?

I found one chain in the internet, which is called 'Zona Sul'- there is a shop of this chain very close to my flat, but are there other chains, which I haven't found on the internet yet?

2. I want to try typical Brasilian food - what do Brazilians eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner? What are typical Brazilians beverages, sweets and snacks?

3. Do I have to buy for metro, railway, busses different tickets - or are they all organised in one cooperation for which I can buy a weekly or monthly ticket?

4. Are there taximeters or can a taxi driver charge you any price?

5. What is the best way to get from the airport to your apartment? My flight will arrive around 4.00 a.m. - therefore I might get problems to get from the airport to the apartment with public transport...

6. I started to learn a little bit portuguese - I think it is important to speak a little bit of the language of the host country... Is english widely spoken in Rio de Janeiro or do I have to be prepared to talke with hands and feet?

Edited by Citius Altius Fortius
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I don't want to answer 1 and 2, because I feel those are more resident questions.

3) Theoretically, travel is free throughout the city for every day you have a ticket to an event. Otherwise, I'm pretty sure they're separate.

4) There are meters, but a few are rigged. I once got one from SDU where it was flying. Otherwise, I feel that taxis are pretty affordable, especially compared to European standards

5) Check the route of the Real bus. If you're near a stop, it's super convenient. You'd probably get to the area around 6 AM after customs and baggage pickup, so you'd likely be fine from a safety perspective.

6) English is maybe marginally widely spoken among the educated class. I wouldn't count on a bus driver speaking English. If you speak Spanish, you can get by, although people will think you're an idiot (the route I took). Also, Brazil (mainly in the South, but some all over), has a lot of your former countrymen/women, due to mass migration after WWII. Many of them still speak, as my German speaking friend learned during during Carnival.

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Hello guys,

1. I recommend Zona Sul and Pão de Açucar. They are expensive, but there you can find everything you want with a great quality.

2. In Rio... it's hard to say in Brazil since it varies a lot.

breakfast: coffee + milk or just coffee

orange juice

or a shake with milk and fruits like banana, avocado, papaya, strawberry or others

a kind of a roll (that we call pão frances) with butter

cheese

ham

fruits

some people have cereals

lunch:

most people generally have rice and beans + a meat + salad. Pasta is also very common. Also what we call churrasco (barbecue).

nowadays those who work generally have lunch in restaurants that charge the food per the weight of it. they have a lot of different options.

dinner:

some eat as much as they eat in lunch... some just repeat more or less what we have for breakfast... some have a snack like pizza.... it depends.

3. they are not one cooperation, but still we have what we call BILHETE ÚNICO wich is a card that you can buy and charge frequently... it can be used in the subway, railway and buses.

4. the official cabs have meters.

5. Real bus is a good option, as it was said... but we will have the BRT BUS RAPID SYSTEM working by then.

6. drupha is right.

Hope I could help you.

Boa tarde!

I started to learn some Portuguese yesterday to prepare myself for my Rio Olympics trip to Brasil next year - I would like to ask our Brazilian members about some practical recommendations/informations:

1. I rented an apartment in Ipanema and I need to buy food in supermarkets - what are the best known supermarket chains in Rio?
I found one chain in the internet, which is called 'Zona Sul'- there is a shop of this chain very close to my flat, but are there other chains, which I haven't found on the internet yet?

2. I want to try typical Brasilian food - what do Brazilians eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner? What are typical Brazilians beverages, sweets and snacks?

3. Do I have to buy for metro, railway, busses different tickets - or are they all organised in one cooperation for which I can buy a weekly or monthly ticket?

4. Are there taximeters or can a taxi driver charge you any price?

5. What is the best way to get from the airport to your apartment? My flight will arrive around 4.00 a.m. - therefore I might get problems to get from the airport to the apartment with public transport...

6. I started to learn a little bit portuguese - I think it is important to speak a little bit of the language of the host country... Is english widely spoken in Rio de Janeiro or do I have to be prepared to talke with hands and feet?

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I just have a quick question for anyone who is well-traveled, or is well-familiar with the Rio De Janeiro. Yes, I know this question is asked probably more than any other question. (Probably many times by myself) But, how safe is Rio? I landed four tickets (Handball, Archery, Fencing, and Athletics)... But so far, it appears as if I'm traveling solo. Most people close to me say they are glad for me going, but consider it to be considerably dangerous to be making such trip on my own. Any advice is greatly appreciated!

Andrew

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So I've traveled to over 70 countries and Brazil, with Rio in particular, being notably magical. There's something about the culture and the hustle and bustle that is magical to me.

Safety is a relative term. I don't think Rio is dangerous to the point where anyone except the very paranoid should cancel a trip. That being said, Rio is absolutely a dangerous city and you should take precautions.

There's always safety in numbers, both within your group and with the surrounding area Understand the traffic flow where you are. I've stayed in centro a couple of times, and it absolutely shuts down at ~6 PM, making it pretty dangerous to be wandering by yourself or in a pair. Be on the watch for bands of young (9-16) boys roaming around. They do not give a damn about authorities (I was told by my local friends that juveniles crime is hardly punished at all), so they will be very brash with what they're willing to do. Nighttime in Zona Sul is known to be a favored time of Carioca stick up artists. There's always stories about people getting mugged on the beach at night or while jogging on the strand. Crimes of opportunity are rampant on the strand in front of the beaches, and if you hang out at a cafe for a few hours, the chance that you see someone chasing a pickpocket or a bag snatcher aren't bad. Also, don't show up with a mag strip atm card. Brazil is notorious for card cloning.

The one rule to remember, above all else, is that regardless of what you're used to where you're from, if someone pulls a knife or a gun on you in Brazil, you give them whatever the hell they want, because the weapon isn't a threat, it's a promise. There's plenty of stories where muggers in Rio have killed their victims even with just a minimal level of resistance. It's not worth it. Don't bring anything you're not willing to give up.

Please keep in mind that the Cariocas always know best, and that I'm just a well traveled tourist with a handful of visits. With my travel experience, I wouldn't hesitate to wander around Rio, and it's one of my favorite cities in the world. Just remember to minimize your risk and always be aware of your surroundings.

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Rio is as dangerous as any big city can be.

Main tip: Don't be the obvious tourist carrying cameras in the neck, holding an Iphone on the hand wearing expensive jewerly.

The worse thing that can happen to you is to be robbed.

Dont's:
People in Rio don't dress as Indiana Jones or like they are in some Hawaiian party.

So, be informal in dressing

Don't carry passports with you all the time, a simple copy is enough for most cases Police asks you some document, if not, tell police guard you can go with them to the hotel to show the original one.

Avoid:

Favela areas. Still, if you really want to go to some favela, go to Dona Marta favela in Botafogo. They have organized tours with guides (and indeed they show all the history of the place).

NEVER GO TO A FAVELA BY YOURSELF!

Taxis:
If possible, turn on your GPS inside the taxi or ask taxi driver to use it. It's your right and this will avoid a lot of problem.

Taxis at hotel front desks are usually paied in front, which is not legal. Ask taxi drive to turn on the taximeter.

There are two flags: 1 - for daylight and 2 - after 8pm and weekends. It's your right to have flag 1 during weekdays.

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So I've traveled to over 70 countries and Brazil, with Rio in particular, being notably magical. There's something about the culture and the hustle and bustle that is magical to me.

Safety is a relative term. I don't think Rio is dangerous to the point where anyone except the very paranoid should cancel a trip. That being said, Rio is absolutely a dangerous city and you should take precautions.

There's always safety in numbers, both within your group and with the surrounding area Understand the traffic flow where you are. I've stayed in centro a couple of times, and it absolutely shuts down at ~6 PM, making it pretty dangerous to be wandering by yourself or in a pair. Be on the watch for bands of young (9-16) boys roaming around. They do not give a damn about authorities (I was told by my local friends that juveniles crime is hardly punished at all), so they will be very brash with what they're willing to do. Nighttime in Zona Sul is known to be a favored time of Carioca stick up artists. There's always stories about people getting mugged on the beach at night or while jogging on the strand. Crimes of opportunity are rampant on the strand in front of the beaches, and if you hang out at a cafe for a few hours, the chance that you see someone chasing a pickpocket or a bag snatcher aren't bad. Also, don't show up with a mag strip atm card. Brazil is notorious for card cloning.

The one rule to remember, above all else, is that regardless of what you're used to where you're from, if someone pulls a knife or a gun on you in Brazil, you give them whatever the hell they want, because the weapon isn't a threat, it's a promise. There's plenty of stories where muggers in Rio have killed their victims even with just a minimal level of resistance. It's not worth it. Don't bring anything you're not willing to give up.

Please keep in mind that the Cariocas always know best, and that I'm just a well traveled tourist with a handful of visits. With my travel experience, I wouldn't hesitate to wander around Rio, and it's one of my favorite cities in the world. Just remember to minimize your risk and always be aware of your surroundings.

Card cloning is more rare now-a-days, but avoid using ATMs at International Airport. Use regular banks in touristic areas, they are okay.

All the rest is somewhat true, but this text is still a bit paranoic - I must say.

I never saw any pickpocket even living in Copacabana for almost a decade, still they happen, specially with unnoticed tourists watching capoeira shows in the middle of the sidewalk - avoid it. Those capoeira shows are truly bad, indeed.

About being robbed, yes, give the thief whatever he wants. This is sadly true. NEVER REACT! And do avoid to look to his face. But, probably, like 99% of the tourists who visit Rio every year, you won't be robbed at all.

Downtown closes at night and become a really dangerous area, just like Miami Downtown. Avoid it.

Lapa district is okay, specially during big events happening in Rio. Lapa is a must-see near Downtown. Just stay in Lapa, after fun, get your taxi back to the hotel and nothing will happen.

Be sure police force during the olympic games will be increased by 6 or 7 times like in the PanAms... In Copacabana there were two police cars parked every 50m or so, so things will be different than daily-basis Rio.

Don't worry, just pay attention in your surroundings, use common sense and have fun!

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