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https://tokyo2020.jp/en/emblem/

I like it. Being a regular visitor to Tokyo and knowing it's skyline and the colours of the cityscape it just works. It is industrial, perhaps even with a touch of steampunk. I think as westerners

You guys better quit this crap now before me or one of the other mods puts an end to this.

Tokyo 2020 urged to scrap open competition to find new logo

An open competition launched by Tokyo 2020 to find a new logo has been criticised by The Professional Association for Design (AIGA) - who want organisers to scrap it.

The search is on to find a new emblem for the Olympics in the Japanese capital after the logo originally chosen had to be scrapped following a plagiarism row.

The competition to find the logo first time around was only open to designers in Japan who had won a specific design award, but the re-run was opened to all Japanese nationals over the age of 18.

As a result nearly 15,000 entries were received before the closing date on December 7, 12,900 from individuals and 1,699 group efforts.

That compared to only 104 entries which were accepted in the contest for the axed design.

The eventual winning designer will receive a prize of ¥1 million (£5,400/$8,200/€7,600) and will be invited to the Opening Ceremonies of both the Olympics and Paralympics, but AIGA say they are against what they call "speculative work".

They object to the competition as they see it as work done for free, with only the hope of getting paid for it, and claim that a "remarkable" design can only be the result of a designer working directly with their client - something the contest renders impossible.

The organisation also argue that opening the competition to non-professionals "disrespects" the design profession and that the cash prize on offer to the winner is not enough for a logo which will be seen across the world millions of times.

http://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1032591/tokyo-2020-urged-to-scrap-open-competition-to-find-new-logo

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If a potentially winning design that is compliant with IOC stated reqs can be cooked up in literally 10 minutes, I don't see why every single participant in an open contest would necessarily have a motivation with compensation in mind. Also, I admit you may be correct and I think too little of the actual design profession, but I believe this is not the sort of thing that requires specialist expertise or years of experience to have a decent shot at.

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It does seem like that organization believes any design not done by a designer is simply not worthy. The logo should represent the people, so it should be made by the people. It shouldn't be limited to those who have designed for decades because a basic concept by a freelance designer or even a student can be chosen and refined. It doesn't have to be refined and perfect right at the start.

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Ok I see how if you replaced stadium with logo design in what I said it seems silly, but in reality designing a structurally sound stadium is vastly different from designing a logo. The reason they're reaching out to the public is because the public was upset that the OC didn't reach out to them. It was an issue of transparency, so they're trying to be as transparent as humanly possible. Even if the OC reached out to qualified designers again, how would they know what to limit the measurement of ability at? Initially it was too strict, but how strict should it be? In reality that question is pretty opinionated since there is no standard in that sense as far as I know.

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Shall we get the public to design the new stadium too?

That, I think, gets close to the heart of the matter. Designing a logo really is something that can be done by an inspired amateur, but designing a logo as part of the overall look is something else entirely, absolutely requiring professionalism (and raising the question of whether LOCOG were in on the LIsa joke).

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That, I think, gets close to the heart of the matter. Designing a logo really is something that can be done by an inspired amateur, but designing a logo as part of the overall look is something else entirely, absolutely requiring professionalism (and raising the question of whether LOCOG were in on the LIsa joke).

I think you summed up well what I was trying to point out with the pre-schooler's logo.

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It's all a matter of logistics. If the Committee got 10,000 amateur entries, how much time would their selection process spend winnowing that number down to a few realistic choices?

#2 - Those amateur designs don't really know the finer points of technical specs of the IOC and printers--which professionals would work around in their submissions.

#3 - if 20 schoolchildren around the islands submit similar designs, how far would the Committee go in trying to placate them? Even if they ask the public to sign waivers, as I'm sure they have done, the amateur public will still have an upper hand in any "copyright" fallout since making it open to amateurs, was essentially a PR stunt to reach out to everyone.

And which is why U.S. Org committees have NOT opened up the design RFPs to the general public; and have basically commissioned' the work on logos, mascots, the "Look," etc. because they also didn't have the budget, the time nor the personnel that Tokyo seems to have for this matter.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Wow and blimey!

Only 311 of 10,666 entries complied with the basic format and legal requirements!

That's how they sensibly cut the grain from the chaff, and at the same time, made the process and exercise seem 'all-inclusive.'

It's all a matter of logistics. If the Committee got 10,000 amateur entries,

He-he-he, I was close again. 10,666 to be exact! I hope they don't end up with a Satanic design. ;)

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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If you were curious, the emblem screening is now down to the final round as the shortlist will be created next week. Only 64 of the original 10,666 remain...

Wow and blimey!

Only 311 of 10,666 entries complied with the basic format and legal requirements!

Evaluation started today.Japanese media says 3 or 4 out of 64 will be chosen eventually.Final entries will be shown to the public at TOCOG's site after they finish trademark/copyright survey.
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Evaluation started today.Japanese media says 3 or 4 out of 64 will be chosen eventually.Final entries will be shown to the public at TOCOG's site after they finish trademark/copyright survey.

Hi Hiroko,

Got your New Year's card. Arigato gozaymas!!

Akemashite omedetō gozaimasu 2 u 2!! :)

明けましておめでとうございます
Akemashiteomedetōgozaimasu
明けましておめでとうございます
Akemashiteomedetōgozaimasu
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Evaluation started today.Japanese media says 3 or 4 out of 64 will be chosen eventually.Final entries will be shown to the public at TOCOG's site after they finish trademark/copyright survey.

it says on their site that they will not allow any other logos to be unveiled until the final logo is unveiled...that's stupid.

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Statement from TOCOG:

The final selection of the winning entry is scheduled to take place in spring this year. Accordingly, the selection committee has not yet completed its selection process.

The number of entries has now been narrowed down to a shortlist of 4. However, if any of these 4 entries are found to resemble any existing designs during the trademark verification processes, another entry will be selected to the shortlist of 4.

Individual designs entered to the competition cannot be made available for public viewing. If any design is made public before the official announcement of the selected Games emblems (scheduled for spring 2016), this entry will be deemed as having contravened the requirement contained the in the Guidelines regarding designs that are already in the public domain (including online). Such designs will be disqualified and will not be eligible for further selection should further selection be required.

We would therefore kindly ask you not to make your design publicly available before the official announcement of the winning entry.

Thank you very much for your kind understanding and cooperation.

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Statement from TOCOG:

If any design is made public before the official announcement of the selected Games emblems (scheduled for spring 2016), this entry will be deemed as having contravened the requirement contained the in the Guidelines regarding designs that are already in the public domain (including online).

Smart rule; makes people less likely to attempt to use the media to gain publicity for their designs ahead of selection.

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  • 3 weeks later...

n-logo-a-20150801-870x408.jpg

Handout images show (from left) emblems created by Spain’s Hey Studio, the Tokyo 2020 Organizing Committee and Olivier Debie for a Belgian theater. | KYODO

Belgian designer drops suit over Tokyo 2020 Olympics logo, cites legal costs

Belgian designer Olivier Debie, who in August filed a plagiarism lawsuit over a Tokyo 2020 Olympics logo by Kenjiro Sano, says he will no longer pursue his grievance in court.
“After consideration, I prefer to withdraw my complaint,” Debie told Kyodo News in a phone interview on Tuesday. “Even if I were to win, the legal costs would be so high that I couldn’t recoup my expenses.”
Debie had claimed the design unveiled by Tokyo last summer copied key elements of a T-shaped logo he created in 2011 for Belgium’s Theatre de Liege. Japanese designer Sano denied committing plagiarism.
While admitting he would have liked compensation for the time he lost during the lawsuit, Debie told Kyodo News he will not proceed with a defense hearing originally scheduled for Feb. 2.
“I have other projects,” he added.
Debie and the theater had jointly filed the plagiarism lawsuit in Belgium against the International Olympic Committee.
The theater came to an agreement with the IOC and pulled out of the suit in October after Sano’s logo was scrapped by the Tokyo Olympics organizers amid plagiarism allegations against other design ideas by Sano and his team.
The Olympic organizing committee is in the final stage of selecting a new logo that an official said may be unveiled around March.

News source:The Japan Times

Jan.,27,2016

Link:http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/01/27/national/crime-legal/belgian-designer-drops-suit-tokyo-2020-olympics-logo-cites-legal-costs/#.VqlQWfmLTIU

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