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28 September 2015 – Announcement of the Membership of the Tokyo 2020 Emblems Selection Committee

Following the recommendations of the preliminary committee, the Tokyo 2020 Executive Board today approved the membership of the Tokyo 2020 Emblems Selection Committee.

Headed by Ryohei Miyata, President of the Tokyo University of the Arts, the Tokyo 2020 Emblems Selection Committee comprises a total of 19 leading figures representing a broad cross-section of Japanese society.

The first meeting of the Tokyo 2020 Emblems Selection Committee will take place on Tuesday 29 September 2015.

Chairperson:

Ryohei MIYATA

 President, Tokyo University of the Arts

Members:

Ryoichi ENOMOTO

 Creative Director

 Visiting Professor, Kyoto University of Art and Design

Yuko HASEGAWA

 Professor, Tama Art University Art Science

Izumi HAYASHI

 Attorney at Law, SAKURAZAKA LAW OFFICES

Hiroshi IMANAKA

 President, Social Welfare Foundation SOOHKAI

 Creative Director, Atelier Incurve

Hiroshi KASHIWAGI

 Professor, Musashino Art University

Mari Christine

 Inter-cultural communications specialist and media personality

Fuyuko MATSUI

 Artist

Kei MATSUSHITA

 Professor of Visual Communication Design,

 Tokyo University of the Arts

Takeshi NATSUNO

 Guest professor, Graduate School of Media and

 Governance of Keio University

Mei NISHIZAKI

 Member, Narahamirai Association

Sadaharu OH

 Chairman of the Board, Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks Corp.

 Chairman, World Children's Baseball Foundation

Fumi SASADA

 President & CEO, Bravis International Limited

Toshiyuki SHIGA

 Member of the Board of Directors and Vice Chairman,

 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.

Ai SUGIYAMA

 Former tennis professional player

 TV sports commentator

Keiichi TADAKI

 Attorney at Law

 Former Prosecutor General

Aki TAGUCHI

 Paralympian, Japanese national shooting team

 Director, Paralympians Association of Japan

Risa TANAKA

 Executive Vice President and Managing Editor, Sendenkaigi Magazine

Hiroshi YAMAMOTO

 Professor, Faculty of Sports and Health Studies of Hosei University

 Former NHK announcer and commentator

http://www.tokyo2020.jp/en/news/index.php?mode=page&id=1479

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Little bit returning to old subject.

Olympic logo selection panel kept in the dark about design changes

The Tokyo Games organizing committee didn’t bother telling the panel that selected the Olympic logo about modifications that led to the final design, which has since been scrapped amid plagiarism accusations, sources said.
Graphics designer Kenjiro Sano, 43, the creator of the 2020 Olympics logo, twice modified the design at the behest of the Olympic organizing committee. But those changes did not receive the approval of the judges who selected Sano’s logo in an international competition, the sources said.
Sano’s design, comprising an uppercase “T” and a red circle representing Japan’s national flag, was withdrawn on Sept. 1 after he was accused by a Belgian designer of plagiarizing a logo for a theater.
“We said many things to Sano, but those things were just our opinions,” an executive of the organizing committee involved in the revisions told The Asahi Shimbun. “We did not give directions.”
Sano’s original design consisted of a “T” made up of triangles and a rectangle, along with a red circle on the bottom right corner.
Earlier, when the organizing committee was denying the plagiarism allegations, members said they asked Sano for a revision because the original logo resembled a design trademarked by a foreign company.
According to sources, however, the first revision was made after some executives of the organizing committee in December last year objected to the “rising sun” circle being placed at the bottom.
Sano presented his second design with the red circle in the upper right corner to the committee in February. The hypotenuses of the right triangles were also curved to create an overall circular effect.
But committee executives argued that the revised design “lost some liveliness,” and they asked Sano for further modifications, the sources said.
Sano submitted the revised logo, which omitted one triangle and changed the colors of the two remaining ones. The committee examined trademarks worldwide to see if any of them resembled modified Olympic logo in early April.
His final design was publicly unveiled on July 24.
However, the organizing committee did not report those developments to members of the panel that chose Sano’s first design as the logo for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The selection panel did not receive an explanation about the changes until the panel chief contacted the organizing committee after the second modification.
Criticism has been rife that the process of selecting and revising the logo was not transparent.
The organizing committee is expected to hold an executive meeting on Sept. 28 to set up a new panel to screen candidates for the Olympic logo.

September 28,2015

News source:The Asahi Shimbun

Link to this article:http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/social_affairs/AJ201509280036

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Tokyo Olympics organizer chair Mori finally apologizes over logo fiasco

Former Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori, who serves as president of the Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games, apologized on Sept. 28 over the turmoil regarding logos for the 2020 event, which resulted in the retraction of the emblems designed by Kenjiro Sano following plagiarism allegations.
"I want to apologize for causing concern among the Japanese people," Mori told a news conference after a committee board meeting in Tokyo. It was announced that the committee's director general Toshiro Muto will return 20 percent of his monthly salary for two months, and two vice director generals, Yukihiko Nunomura and Hiroshi Sato, will also return 10 percent of their salaries each for one month to take responsibility over the disaster. As Mori serves as the chair without pay, he will not be subjected to financial punishment.
In addition, Hidetoshi Maki, the committee's marketing bureau chief, will be reprimanded over the use of photos in documents presented to explain the screening process of the logo competition, which he took from a private blog without the owner's permission.
The committee presented a report reflecting on the development and screening process of the competition and revealed that it had sent requests to eight designers to join the race before it started accepting applications in September last year. Marketing bureau head Maki decided to ask the designers in advance to achieve the highest standards for the competition, the report said.
In the report, it was revealed that the top three designers in the race, including Sano, were among the eight creators who were asked to join the competition. The report concluded that the committee's decision cast doubts on the fairness of the screening process and that a third-party investigation involving experts is necessary on the connection between the pre-competition requests and the result.
Mori said there were two major problems that should be noted regarding the screening process: That the screening board prioritized the design without having discussion on the base concept of the logos; and that the competition was drawn up by only a handful of the committee staff, resulted in a lack of in-house checks. He announced he would establish a team tasked with reform of the committee.
In addition, the report presented a list of problems found in the screening process, including an absolute lack of an explanation and publicity as a result of placing top priority on confidentiality and allowing only award-winning designers to enter the competition. It also pointed out that appointing a majority of screening board members from those working in the field of design, failing to map out measures with the awareness of the advancement in image searches on the Internet, and delayed explanation on details of the production process of the logos all played a part in the latest trouble.
Meanwhile, the Sept. 28 board meeting agreed on the establishment of a new committee tasked with managing a competition for the new logos. Nineteen members, including baseball team Fukuoka Softbank Hawks chairman Sadaharu Oh, have been appointed to the committee. Its first meeting is scheduled on Sept. 29.

September 29,2015

News source:The Mainichi

Link:http://mainichi.jp/english/english/newsselect/news/20150929p2a00m0sp016000c.html

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^^ They did it because he (Sano) plagiarized it, Otherwise they would had let it untouched. I like they moved swiftly and made the right decision before letting it get worse. I'm still worried about the people who lead the organizing comittee, though.

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Finally. This is what they should had done in the beggining, instead of just letting the decision at the hands of a gang of senile old men deatached to the current times. At least they admitted their screwup and are trying to fix it up. Though this could also means we're going to see a much safer and "generic" logo since I doubt they will be taking much risks this time.

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The Tokyo 2020 Emblems Selection Committee Outlines Potential Selection Criteria

The Tokyo 2020 Emblems Selection Committee today outlined potential selection criteria for the Tokyo 2020 emblems, keywords for the emblems concept, requirements for applicants, as well as a basic timeline of the selection process.
The application process is currently being finalised. The official launch of the competition and details for the submission of designs will be announced in due course.
Keywords for the concept of the emblems
• The power of sport
• Typifying Japan and/or Tokyo
• World peace
• Achieving a personal best, exerting the utmost efforts
• Inclusivity
• Innovation
• Futuristic
• Recovery, Reconstruction (from the 2011 earthquake and tsunami)
Selection criteria
• Empathy – designs should be able to elicit empathy with a large
  number of people
• Symbolism – designs should be worthy of serving as the symbols of
  the Tokyo 2020 Games
• Originality – designs should be highly original or distinctive
• Design concept – designs should incorporate an outstanding design
  concept
• Scalability – designs should incorporate a high degree of scalability
  for use on various forms of media, including licensed products,
  promotional materials, Games adornments, etc.
• Reproducibility – designs should incorporate a consistent design
  image that retains its impact when used in a variety of different forms
  (e.g. in black and white, enlarged or reduced image, etc.)
Requirements for applicants
• The competition is open to everyone regardless of previous
  experience or formal qualifications
• All applicants must be 18 years of age or over
• Japanese nationals or foreign nationals resident in Japan
• Group entries are also invited. However, all group entries must
  specify an individual person with whom future contact can be
  conducted. The specified person must meet the above age,
  nationality and residential requirements (group entries are permitted
  to enable children and foreign nationals resident abroad to
  participate in the competition). Please note that groups must not
  exceed ten people.
• All individual or group entries must submit one set of emblem
  designs only (one set constitutes one emblem design for the
  Olympic Games and one emblem design for the Paralympic Games)
Timeline
• Mid-October: Official launch of the Tokyo 2020 Emblems’ design
  competition
• 7 December: Deadline for the submission of designs
• Spring 2016: Official announcement of the Tokyo 2020 Games
  Emblems

https://tokyo2020.jp/en/news/index.php?mode=page&id=1495

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I think this is the most important part:

The competition is open to everyone regardless of previous experience or formal qualifications

Now anyone from a design student to someone who was a designer in 1964 can contribute instead of a few secretly chosen designers and a bunch of, dare I say, decoys.

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I also think 2 months is more than enough to come up with something cool. Also glad to see the contest is now open for everyone. This increases the chances of seeing something good this time.

Also this means we will see the logo for the handover ceremony, too.

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