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With respect, but that's not gonna happen.

Delhi is the only city in India that could bid for the Olympic Games - and even then, India requires a few more years before it can be taken seriously as a prospective bidder by the IOC. All of that said, I'm confident that India will get its act together and present a credible bid. But that can only happen with a city with worldwide recognition - like Delhi. Right now, though, the best thing would be to fix the IOA and its structures, invest into the country's sports infrastructure and really get a bigger haul of medals (proportionate to India's overall population size).

I saw this article in the Guardian today, and from the looks of it, Prime Minister Modi seems to be a rather intelligent guy. Regardless of what Bach may have told him, he must be aware that an Olympic Games in Asia, just four years after Tokyo 2020 is a non-starter. I expect this putative Ahmedabad bid to disappear right into the box it emerged from...and for India not to enter a really credible bid until later in the 2020s.

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Here's that Guardian article...

@MissEurasia: The Commonwealth Games fiasco had a lot to do with the country's then-governing centre-left, populist Congress Party, which has a tradition of placing loyalists of the ruling Nehru/Gandhi dynasty into plum jobs like the chairmanship of the Commonwealth Games Organizing Committee (hence, why you ended up with a party hack from the state of Maharashtra, Suresh Kalmadi, who had no link or relation to Delhi at all).

The situation has changed in the meantime: Indians elected a new centre-right government by a landslide, whilst the state of Delhi also voted the Congress Party out (leaving it with exactly 0 seats in a state it used to run for more than a decade). Also, according to the Guardian, Prime Minister Modi wants to examine the feasibility and benefits of bidding first, before jumping headlong into this. The Prime Minister was a highly successful administrator as premier of the state of Gujarat - so I trust his judgment on this one...

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India have a lot of work to do to repair the damage that was done for the Delhi Commonwealth Games in 2010. It was poorly organised with corruption.

Absolutely - but it's always worth bearing in mind that time does heal wounds, and Indians themselves voted a new government into power which is keen to boost the country's infrastructure and development pronto. Like in every country, some political parties just do certain things better than others.

The centre-right in India (which is now running the federal government) gets things done, the centre-left with the hapless Congress (that brought you the Commonwealth Games, including the corruption, incompetence and scandals) is primarily known for populism, spending other people's money and sycophancy within its ranks...However, in the mid- to long run, I think it'd be unfair to ascribe the failures of a small coterie of incompetents to an entire nation or even a city like Delhi. Every country has had its fair share of scandals and corruption - the only difference is the blatant manner in which Messrs Kalmadi and Bhanot dabbled in incompetence.

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I think the way Delhi 2020 screwed contractors and sponsors will bite them for a long time.

India is not the most business friendly country for foreigners, and those that provide money and services have a long memory and loud voices.

Well, I would caution against casting aspersions against "the Indians" or "India as a whole" just on the basis of the incompetence and blatant corruption of the Commonwealth Games Committee (which I'm not disputing in the slightest). India is a rising country with a well-educated, Anglophone workforce, a comparably stable political system, substantially increased foreign investment and a rich, fascinating culture - as well as a middle class of 350-450 million people.

Poverty is not exactly an objection, either - it has been seen in many Olympic host cities and is, sadly, a fact of life. We in the West, with our welfare cheques, expansive healthcare systems free at the point of use for anyone (well, in theory) and housing grants for poor families have just found a much more efficient way to administer poverty in a human manner. Btw, I'm speaking from what I know of Germany, the Netherlands and the UK. Hence, no offence if this is absolutely not what it's like in other nations.

I do agree, however, that successfully hosting a multi-sport event like the Asian Games would probably go some way towards rehabilitating the reputation of India as a prospective host of the Olympic Games. As previously indicated, they also need to work on their sports infrastructure (for training their athletes) overall and improve their medal haul in Rio and Tokyo before we can seriously discuss India as a host.

That said, India would also be a place where the IOC can make both a commercial and a social impact. It's debatable whether Western countries can draw a genuine benefit from hosting the Olympic Games, but any Indian host city definitely would. Heck, even the maligned Commonwealth Games, despite the corruption and creeping sycophancy of the Congress Party-led elite had a positive effect or two for Delhi's infrastructure: A brand-new Terminal 3 of the International Airport, the Delhi Metro, the introduction of air-conditioned buses running on bio-fuels and a greater willingness to go after the purveyors of corruption à la Suresh Kalmadi. Arguably, the Olympic Games would spur a regeneration across Delhi, the likes of which haven't been seen by the IOC for a very long time. I also happen to believe that the Commonwealth Games fiasco has actually sharpened Indians' antennae to these issues, as well as their vigilance.

Am I an apologist for India? Absolutely not - they screwed up the CWG big time and deserved much of the scorn poured over them. But do I end up doubting Indians' general capacity for staging events like the Olympics successfully? Certainly not.

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