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Probably a long shot but worth a thread nonetheless.

Victoria's former premier who just lost the election a few weeks back had expressed interest in bidding for the 2024 Olympics.

http://www.couriermail.com.au/sport/more-sports/bring-olympic-games-back-to-melbourne-leaders-say/story-fnii0hmo-1227023949895

And the current Melbourne Mayor supported a potential bid for 2024 back in 2012.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/olympics/9474783/Melbourne-aims-to-bid-as-future-Olympic-host-as-mayor-says-no-other-city-is-better-prepared-right-now.html

Melbourne has hosted numerous world events including the 2006 Commonwealth Games and had a failed bid for the 1996 games. Definitely the sporting capital of Australia and our best chance at landing another Olympics (sorry Brisbane).

But Australian IOC member and now IOC vice president John Coates ruled out a bid back in 2009.

http://www.smh.com.au/news/sport/aoc-wont-bid-for-2024-olympics-coates/2009/01/18/1232213439618.html

Thoughts?

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Not happening in 2024. At first glance Id dismiss any Aussie chances pre 2040, but there is another narrative where I could see it being achievable with a measured bid. Melbourne and Brisbane each have merits, Perth is a no go.

I think if faced with a similar race to 2020 in 2028 it could very well happen.

I still maintain that if Sydney had hosted in 1988, and Melbourne had bidded for 2020 it very likely would have beat Tokyo.

I can't see an Olympic bid being a huge priority for the new government, given the huge demand for new public infrastructure as an outcome of last months Victoria state election.

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narrative where I I still maintain that if Sydney had hosted in 1988, and Melbourne had bidded for 2020 it very likely would have beat Tokyo.

TOO hypothetical. There's really no way of knowing that, cuz as we all should know by now, any deviation from the Olympic history host roster, as we now know it, would've set a whole different set of future circumstances. For all we know, had that happened, 2020 would've seen a whole set of different/additional bidders.

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TOO hypothetical. There's really no way of knowing that, cuz as we all should know by now, any deviation from the Olympic history host roster, as we now know it, would've set a whole different set of future circumstances. For all we know, had that happened, 2020 would've seen a whole set of different/additional bidders.

This. rings, if you want to play an alternative history game, go for it. But you can't make that one change as if it wouldn't have affected everything after it. Who do you suppose hosts 2000 if not Sydney then?

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I would also say Melbourne would be Australia's best chance but after 2040, otherwise it's too close to Sydney 2000. I don't think Brisbane has much of a chance and Perth has nearly no chance. Sydney hosted in 2000, so Melbourne could bid after 2040.

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Melbourne would be Australia's best chance of hosting, but not before 2040. I would say Sydney, but they hosted in 2000, so Melbourne probably has the better chance.

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I know we've debated whether or not it's a certain continent's "turn" in the minds of the IOC, but it would strike me as particularly blind for anyone in Melbourne to think the IOC would place a fourth Games in a row in one of the farthest east time zones, away from Europe and the Americas. If I were advising Melbourne, I'd tell them to keep their powder dry until '32 or '36.

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I know we've debated whether or not it's a certain continent's "turn" in the minds of the IOC, but it would strike me as particularly blind for anyone in Melbourne to think the IOC would place a fourth Games in a row in one of the farthest east time zones, away from Europe and the Americas. If I were advising Melbourne, I'd tell them to keep their powder dry until '32 or '36.

Melbourne has never made any formal indication that it is bidding. It is not bidding - at least for any Olympics this side of 2030.

Besides which - with such limited options available to the IOC they wish they had a candidate like Melbourne right now for them to have an assured vibrant and hassle free games. It could certainly give its sister city Boston a run for its money.

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Melbourne has never made any formal indication that it is bidding. It is not bidding - at least for any Olympics this side of 2030.

Besides which - with such limited options available to the IOC they wish they had a candidate like Melbourne right now for them to have an assured vibrant and hassle free games. It could certainly give its sister city Boston a run for its money.

My post was in the context of this thread. True, Melbourne hasn't made an official bid.

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Melbourne hasn't made an official bid, but if Australia were to bid, Melbourne would most likely be their bidder. Usually Sydney would be chosen, but because of Sydney 2000, Melbourne would probably be chosen, if not, then Brisbane. Perth has no chance.

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Melbourne hasn't made an official bid, but if Australia were to bid, Melbourne would most likely be their bidder. Usually Sydney would be chosen, but because of Sydney 2000, Melbourne would probably be chosen, if not, then Brisbane. Perth has no chance.

Can see your point Tony...but gee did you have to make it a tongue twister? :blink::)

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Melbourne hasn't made an official bid, but if Australia were to bid, Melbourne would most likely be their bidder. Usually Sydney would be chosen, but because of Sydney 2000, Melbourne would probably be chosen, if not, then Brisbane. Perth has no chance.

And why does Perth have no chance? They have a good public transport network (notably having a working smart card system already up and running when Melbourne was trying to implement Myki) They're building a new major stadium (which may be the centerpiece, but they can do what London did as well).

I'm not sure if them being 3 hours behind the East coast is a good thing, but maybe that's more beneficial for the foreign market.

Don't necessarily ride them off, after a few failed bids, Perth could be the one after a Melbourne and Brisbane attempt.

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And why does Perth have no chance? They have a good public transport network (notably having a working smart card system already up and running when Melbourne was trying to implement Myki) They're building a new major stadium (which may be the centerpiece, but they can do what London did as well).

I'm not sure if them being 3 hours behind the East coast is a good thing, but maybe that's more beneficial for the foreign market.

Don't necessarily ride them off, after a few failed bids, Perth could be the one after a Melbourne and Brisbane attempt.

Have you ever been to Perth- it is much too small to host a Games, it wouldn't have a quarter of the hotels needed for starters. At least Brisbane can use the Gold Coast for facilities and accommodation.

The next Aus bid has to be Melbourne, everything is already in place, it is a large city and growing. It is a beta city as well. Sydney has had its go, it will not bid again, and it would seem fair for another city to have its turn.

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Have you ever been to Perth- it is much too small to host a Games, it wouldn't have a quarter of the hotels needed for starters. At least Brisbane can use the Gold Coast for facilities and accommodation.

The next Aus bid has to be Melbourne, everything is already in place, it is a large city and growing. It is a beta city as well. Sydney has had its go, it will not bid again, and it would seem fair for another city to have its turn.

I have been to Perth. I wouldn't call it too small by the 2020's or 2030's there could easily be 25,000+ actual hotel rooms, a further 20,000+ in other forms of accommodation and you can prop the rest up in cruise ships. Have a dedicated media village to support media accommodation.

Perth will only bid once failed Melbourne and Brisbane bids have come about.

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And why does Perth have no chance? They have a good public transport network (notably having a working smart card system already up and running when Melbourne was trying to implement Myki) They're building a new major stadium (which may be the centerpiece, but they can do what London did as well).

I'm not sure if them being 3 hours behind the East coast is a good thing, but maybe that's more beneficial for the foreign market.

Don't necessarily ride them off, after a few failed bids, Perth could be the one after a Melbourne and Brisbane attempt.

Perth stands no chance. If Australia were to bid with Melbourne or Brisbane and they didn't end up hosting, they would probably bid with Sydney again before bidding with Perth.

Perth stands no chance. Even Brisbane doesn't have much chance, but they have more chance then Perth does.

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Perth stands no chance. If Australia were to bid with Melbourne or Brisbane and they didn't end up hosting, they would probably bid with Sydney again before bidding with Perth.

Perth stands no chance. Even Brisbane doesn't have much chance, but they have more chance then Perth does.

You are not a psychic, nor an Australian so your ability to forecast with such precision is limited.

Here is a log for the fire: Perth is currently growing fast, and likely to overtake Brisbane as Australia's third largest city in about 20 years when its population will be just over 3 million. Much of that depends on resources, but its not some small outpost. Having said that - I do not believe its Summer Olympic material. Its significantly bigger than cities like Calgary and San Diego, which it is often compared to.

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You are not a psychic, nor an Australian so your ability to forecast with such precision is limited.

Here is a log for the fire: Perth is currently growing fast, and likely to overtake Brisbane as Australia's third largest city in about 20 years when its population will be just over 3 million. Much of that depends on resources, but its not some small outpost. Having said that - I do not believe its Summer Olympic material. Its significantly bigger than cities like Calgary and San Diego, which it is often compared to.

But it's realistic that Perth stands no chance. Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and then Perth, is the most realistic Australian bidder. Sydney hosted in 2000, so that gives way to Melbourne.

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