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Istanbul has more chance of hosting the Summer Olympics then Doha, but Istanbul still won't host a Summer Olympics anytime soon.

Umm, really depends on who the final line-up of 2024 bidders are. If Paris & South Africa don't bid, Germany picks Hamburg, Rome still struggles with their weak economy, & the others are Baku-ku & Doha-ha, & Erdogan promises the IOC the moon, I wouldn't be so sure to outright dismiss Istanbul in a scenario like that one. Just have to wait & see who will ultimately come out & play.

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tony is gonna burst a blood vessel

Oh no, they can indeed withdraw it whenever they damn well want. But they'll probably wait till after they've produced, but not yet released, their bid book - just to annoy Lord David.

Tony you've improved a lot. But i feel like every second word from you is now Agenda2020 or Geopolitics.

Umm, really depends on who the final line-up of 2024 bidders are. If Paris & South Africa don't bid, Germany picks Hamburg, Rome still struggles with their weak economy, & the others are Baku-ku & Doha-ha, & Erdogan promises the IOC the moon, I wouldn't be so sure to outright dismiss Istanbul in a scenario like that one. Just have to wait & see who will ultimately come out & play.

Well, I knew Istanbul wasn't going to host 2020. With 2024, I'm confident that at least 1 bidder will have a better bid then Istanbul, whether it's Rome, Berlin or Hamburg, Paris, Durban or Boston. Istanbul stands no chance in hosting 2024.

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Like I said, until we OFFICIALLY know who is going to be on the 2024 applicant roster come September, we won't really know who's going to have a "better" bid. It's not the better bids wind up every time.

Again, if Paris & South Africa are out, I don't see any of the others you listed as huge threats to Istanbul (of course if they bid as well), since they will have also have their own major hurdles to overcome, especially Rome.

And virtually any objective person knew that 2020 was for the most part going to be Tokyo. Istanbul was the dark horse, & Madrid was plagued with issues. So it's not like "knew" anything that the rest of us didn't.

*you 'knew'

Like in 2020, it can be expected that the Rome bid will in large parts based on existing sporting infrastructure lessening some of the costs for the games.

Well, that would be a contradictory issue for them then, especially if they cite that the Games would 'spur' development, much like Madrid touted for 2020. Rome better figure out which narrative they really wanna use before looking transparent, like a certain other 2020 bid city did.

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Well, it seems this will be another tough bidding race for the IOC. I highly doubt Rome, Madrid or any German city pull ahead for the SOG 2024 race. Even Paris looks unlikely, above all with the recent incidents. I do agree that for Istanbul is hard due to the Iraqi/Syrian border and the Black Sea crap going on up north.

Naming Boston for this race, to me is like a miscarriage, a simple abortion that the USOC didn't want to support.

So the path is free for South Africa if they really want the first African nation to host.

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There will be at least one good European bid, if it's Rome, Berlin or Hamburg or Paris. I'm confident at least one of them will bid.

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Well, it seems this will be another tough bidding race for the IOC. I highly doubt Rome, Madrid or any German city pull ahead for the SOG 2024 race. Even Paris looks unlikely, above all with the recent incidents. I do agree that for Istanbul is hard due to the Iraqi/Syrian border and the Black Sea crap going on up north.

Naming Boston for this race, to me is like a miscarriage, a simple abortion that the USOC didn't want to support.

So the path is free for South Africa if they really want the first African nation to host.

The path was pretty free for them for 2020, but they weren't interested. Doesn't matter how wide open that path is if they're not interested in walking down it. When South Africa is good and ready, they'll bid. And chances are, regardless of who the competition is, they'll be a formidable opponent.

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The path was pretty free for them for 2020, but they weren't interested. Doesn't matter how wide open that path is if they're not interested in walking down it. When South Africa is good and ready, they'll bid. And chances are, regardless of who the competition is, they'll be a formidable opponent.

And you bet they've been studying the whole process these last few (and next) rounds.

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The path was pretty free for them for 2020, but they weren't interested. Doesn't matter how wide open that path is if they're not interested in walking down it. When South Africa is good and ready, they'll bid. And chances are, regardless of who the competition is, they'll be a formidable opponent.

True. Like I said before, Durban should work on their 2022 Commonwealth Games bid a bit more first, then bid for a Summer Olympics.

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Ex Ferrari chief Montezemolo likely to lead Rome 2024 bid

ROME (AP) -- Former Ferrari president Luca Cordero Di Montezemolo is gaining support to become the head of Rome's bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

''It's not my job to (choose) but I have to say he's perfect, because of his experience in international sports and business,'' longtime International Olympic Committee member Mario Pescante told The Associated Press on Thursday.

Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malago is expected to announce Montezemolo's appointment sometime in the next two weeks, according to the ANSA news agency and La Repubblica newspaper.

...

AP

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/ex-ferrari-chief-montezemolo-likely-lead-rome-2024-160106540--spt.html

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  • 3 weeks later...

^Montezemolo confirmed to lead Rome bid

Ex Ferrari Chief Montezemolo to Lead Rome 2024 Bid
ROME — Feb 10, 2015, 7:43 AM ET

Former Ferrari president Luca Cordero Di Montezemolo will lead Rome's bid for the 2024 Olympics, providing the candidacy with a high-profile figure boasting extensive experience in international sports and business.

Montezemolo stepped down from Ferrari in October after 23 years as president of the Italian car manufacturer, during which its Formula One team had some its most successful years.

"I don't think anyone in Italy is as popular as Luca is abroad," Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Malago said Tuesday while announcing Montezemolo's appointment. "That says it all."

The 67-year-old Montezemolo, who did not attend the announcement, also led the organizing committee for the 1990 World Cup in Italy. He was named Alitalia's chairman in November.

"He's perfect, because of his experience in international sports and business," longtime International Olympic Committee member Mario Pescante told The Associated Press last month.

Luca Pancalli, the president of Italy's Paralympic committee, was named vice president of the bid committee.

Italian Premier Matteo Renzi announced Rome's cost-conscious Olympic bid in December, two years after Italy scrapped plans to bid for the 2020 Games because of financial concerns.

Rome — which hosted the 1960 Olympics — and Boston are the only declared bidders so far for 2024. Germany will decide between Berlin and Hamburg as its candidate. Paris is also weighing a bid. Other possible contenders are South Africa; Doha, Qatar; Budapest, Hungary; and Baku, Azerbaijan.

The IOC will select the host city in 2017.

Montezemolo and Malago will travel to Lausanne, Switzerland, on Wednesday to meet with IOC President Thomas Bach. They intend to ask for clarifications on Bach's recently approved reform agenda, which is intended to make Olympic bidding and hosting less expensive and more flexible.

"We want to understand what we can do, what we must do, and what we should do," Malago said.

Meanwhile, Rome Mayor Ignazio Mario has expressed concern over debts and failed construction projects from the 1960 Games, the 1990 World Cup and the 2009 swimming world championships in the capital.

Mario said the city is still paying off debts from the 1960 Games and cited a failed rail project from the World Cup. Marino also pointed to a half-completed sports arena and swimming pool complex designed by architect Santiago Calatrava on the outskirts of the city for the 2009 worlds that cost an estimated 400 million euros ($450 million).

"I want an opposite model, a city that invests for the good of its citizens and an Olympics that helps improve the quality of life, transportation and urban planning," Marino said Sunday.

Montezemolo joined Ferrari in 1973, brought in by founding father Enzo Ferrari as his assistant. After a brief period away from the company, he returned as president in 1991 and the team won six F1 drivers' titles — five by Michael Schumacher, one by Kimi Raikkonen — and eight constructors' titles while he was in charge.

Montezemolo left Ferrari amid a recent decline by the F1 team, and at about the same time as the stock listing of merged parent company Fiat-Chrysler. His severance package was nearly 27 million euros (more than $30 million).

Malago said Montezemolo would not be paid for his work on the bid committee.

Rome is considering a budget of 6 billion euros (about $7 billion) — $2 billion of which would be covered by the IOC. The bid committee's budget will be 5 to 10 million euros ($6-$12 million).

AP

http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireStory/ferrari-chief-montezemolo-lead-rome-2024-bid-28852990

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  • 2 weeks later...

So a Dutch informed me of this happening, and I'm glad that this happened today and not 2 years from now as it would have looked pretty bad on Rome's part on the way it handled the situation. The sad thing is, the game ended in a draw lol

http://www.newsday.com/news/world/rome-mayor-dutch-must-pay-for-damage-by-feyenoord-fans-1.9957609

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The thing with Rome's bid, apart from the financial issues surrounding Italy, Rome actually has a strong bid. I do know and realise that financial is a big part in a bid.

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The thing with Rome's bid, apart from the financial issues surrounding Italy, Rome actually has a strong bid. I do know and realise that financial is a big part in a bid.

Very insightful, especially given the financial part is the only half we know about and a preliminary venue plan has not even been released.

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Very insightful, especially given the financial part is the only half we know about and a preliminary venue plan has not even been released.

Yes, but based on their 2020 bid, Rome had a strong bid. Only the financial side of it let Rome down.

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Yes, but based on their 2020 bid, Rome had a strong bid. Only the financial side of it let Rome down.

I'm interested Tony - what do you think was strong about their bid plan? What parts of their plan were stronger than the other bidders? Could you give me a link to the plan that you are basing your assessment on?

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Yeah, I'm interested too about why is Rome strong relative to some other cities. Having been to Rome recently I could see major obstacles, quite literally, in their bid. I am not saying it can't be done, just that the city has some infrastractural issues due to its characteristics that other big European capitals don't have.

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Well, I've acknowledged that Rome has financial problems. But based on their 2020 bid, they seemed to be the strongest alongside Tokyo. The IOC even thinks that. Rome last hosted in 1960, so that helped them. Italy could also re-use some of those venues. Same went for Tokyo, re-using some venues from 1964.

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Well, Tony's going by the fact of re-use of pre-existing venues as that seems to have worked for Tokyo to win a Round 2. Except that, Tony, most of Rome's 1960 venues still standing, are quite outdated and are probably better off being demolished and starting from scratch. Plus, the 1960 set would probably only fulfill 55% of the new requirements. But then again, all of this is Rome's problem to solve, Tony; not yours or mine.

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Well, I've acknowledged that Rome has financial problems. But based on their 2020 bid, they seemed to be the strongest alongside Tokyo. The IOC even thinks that. Rome last hosted in 1960, so that helped them. Italy could also re-use some of those venues. Same went for Tokyo, re-using some venues from 1964.

Tony, I was after a bit more detail. You can't just say a bid was 'strong" on a forum like GamesBids and expect not to have to explain exactly why. Where did you read the details of the bid plan? What particular parts of the plan were so strong? Where did the IOC say the bid plan was strong (I thought they didn't even get sent the application file)? Where's your links to all of this?

C'mon Tony. I'm really, really interested. I've never seen Rome's 2020 bid plan. At the very least please, please send me a link to that plan you're basing your statements on so I can see for myself finally.

Edited by Sir Rols
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Yes, but based on their 2020 bid, Rome had a strong bid. Only the financial side of it let Rome down.

"Only" the financial side? Arguably, after Montréal 1976 and the IOC being almost cast into oblivion during Lord Killanin's term, every IOC member and his/her grandmother knows that money is the name of the game. Hence, the TOP programme. Hence, worldwide partners. Hence, marketing the crap out of the Olympic Games under Samaranch.

Which specific parts of the Rome bid are you referring to? Can you cite actual sources (rather than your own unfounded assertions, which don't become truer by repetition) or are you just making things up? Just on the financial count alone, Rome is thoroughly unsuitable as an Olympic City.

That aside, it's time for other nations to host the Olympic Games, including Germany and France. The Italians had their turn twice in the past fifty years...A cynic might think that Renzi's push for Rome 2024 is equivalent to a drug dealer selling the latest stash of cocaine to an addict who just can't concede the reality that he should be on rehab. The drug, in this case, is overspending and living beyond one's means. The addict is the Italian public which clearly is unable to fathom that reforms, modernization and saying goodbye to big government and massive overspending hurt. Prime Minister Renzi is selling a pipedream to the Italian public, and the IOC would be utterly stupid not to encourage him (just for the sake of having more candidates in the race).

I just pray that the IOC wouldn't be so utterly irresponsible, senile and stupid to actually award the Olympic Games to yet another Mediterranean nation that doesn't have its finances in order.

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from what I know rome 2020 venue plan had nearly every indoor sport in the fiera roma, and after that , a bunch of temp+existing sites throughout the downtown core of the city. I think the only things that were 100% new were the velodrome and flatwater course and whitewater slalom.

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