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See Tony, this is an example of what pisses everybody off about you. It's just so rich and hypocritical from Young Master "I don't care what you think, it's my opinion and I'm allowed to say it again

Don't stress guys. At least we only have to deal with a daily 20 minute Tony troll fest. It's much better than the way it used to be when we had to listen to this little arsehole all day.

"T" is for Tony and Troll.

I fixed it for you

It's called a Full Stop.

Anyway, I'm not going to continue these silly arguments. Your arguing with Yourselves, These arguments are getting very very boring, I'm sure most would agree. Let's get back to San Francisco 2024 Topic. Thank You.

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It's called a Full Stop.

Anyway, I'm not going to continue these silly arguments. Your arguing with Yourselves, These arguments are getting very very boring, I'm sure most would agree. Let's get back to San Francisco 2024 Topic. Thank You.

In punctuation, the full stop (in British English) or period (in American English) is the punctuation mark placed at the end of a sentence.

GFYS

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(Slightly misleading title)

USA To Bid for 2024 Olympics

http://citizen.co.za/271693/usa-bid-2024-olympics/

And Tony please don't respond to this post with a "that's nice but 2024 is Europe's time" attitude. Try to stay open-minded, bruh. Saying things like that all if a sudden really dampers the mood and is probably one of the most annoying reasons these "silly arguments" begin.

I also think that because this is an international board, we should all respect the differences we originate from. I'm not saying I don't do it (which I do realize I can be *slightly* provocative sometimes), but these small arguments about what the period/full stop is called should just cease. (This part was not aimed for just Tony)

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That's not slightly misleading, it's extremely misleading. The title should be more along the lines of Some guy wants to see USA bid for 2024 Olympics. That seems a lot more accurate

I have never even heard of that so called "influential figure".

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In punctuation, the full stop (in British English) or period (in American English) is the punctuation mark placed at the end of a sentence.

GFYS

No need to be rude. You started this by 'Correcting' My origional Post, when I said Full Stop, when Full Stop is the Correct way of saying it here in England. I responded the wrong way, but You started this.

Full Stop is how we say . here in England. End of argument. Let's move on.

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No need to be rude. You started this by 'Correcting' My origional Post, when I said Full Stop, when Full Stop is the Correct way of saying it here in England. I responded the wrong way, but You started this.

Full Stop is how we say . here in England. End of argument. Let's move on.

4 posts a day and this is how you use them.

The rest of us had moved on and back to topic. Let it go every once in a while. We know what it's called in England. You just said it twice in 1 post for some reason. The rest of us don't live in England. We call it something else. If you want us to respect your country, have some respect for the rest of ours and understand there's a world outside of London and England with which you are interacting here. 1 of the nice things about this site is that there are people from all over the world here. Keep that in mind when you're telling us how you do things where you live.

Anyways, actually getting back to topic here..

Should S.F. bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics? Maybe

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4 posts a day and this is how you use them.

The rest of us had moved on and back to topic. Let it go every once in a while. We know what it's called in England. You just said it twice in 1 post for some reason. The rest of us don't live in England. We call it something else. If you want us to respect your country, have some respect for the rest of ours and understand there's a world outside of London and England with which you are interacting here. 1 of the nice things about this site is that there are people from all over the world here. Keep that in mind when you're telling us how you do things where you live.

Anyways, actually getting back to topic here..

Should S.F. bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics? Maybe

1) Maybe You should be saying this to Bernham, seeing as though he started this by 'Correcting' Me, when it doesn't need a Correction. Full Stop is how we say it here in England.

2) Maybe You should stop getting involved in an argument that doesn't involve You, it was between Me and Bernham.

3) You very rarely let things go, so don't be a hypocrite.

4) The amount of Times I've tried taking a Thread back on Topic but others have kept it off Topic.

5) I will use My posts how I want to use My Posts.

6) Back onto Topic, I don't want to argue.

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Of course, This obviously doesn't sound rude and a-matter-of-a-fact-ly in your face...

It's called a Full Stop.

That's not slightly misleading, it's extremely misleading. The title should be more along the lines of Some guy wants to see USA bid for 2024 Olympics. That seems a lot more accurate

It felt like it sounded weird when I put really or extremely as I couldn't think of anything to add to that.

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4) The amount of Times I've tried taking a Thread back on Topic but others have kept it off Topic.

6) Back onto Topic, I don't want to argue.

Saying "Back to topic" is not the same as trying to take a thread back to topic. Posting something relevant to the topic is trying to take a thread back to topic. Saying you want to argue is not relevant to the topic. I just posted something about SF 2024. Look forward to your thoughts on that.

* saying you don't want to arugue

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I think for any US city to host the games especially as they have grown and with a lack of government funding. Even LA with a redevelopment of the Coliseum will find it not to be a cheap exercise.

As for San Francisco, although there are some iconic images of the city, suggestions I have seen include incorporating facilities in San Jose and Oakland which would make it one of the widest spread games ever and considering some of the international cities San Francisco might be competing against this might be the greatest achillies heel

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suggestions I have seen include incorporating facilities in San Jose and Oakland which would make it one of the widest spread games ever and considering some of the international cities San Francisco might be competing against this might be the greatest achillies heel

Oakland could essentially be part of the same city.. it's close to downtown, connected by the subway, etc. San Jose is far, but I'm not sure how many non-football events they would get, if any.

And I think you underestimate how spread out games are in other cities. London had the traditional "far away" venues for football and sailing. Whitewater, mountain biking and rowing were out in surburbia. And even the venues that were in "greater London" were pretty far spread. Wibledon, Wembly and Greenwich arne't exactly compact.

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I think for any US city to host the games especially as they have grown and with a lack of government funding. Even LA with a redevelopment of the Coliseum will find it not to be a cheap exercise.

As for San Francisco, although there are some iconic images of the city, suggestions I have seen include incorporating facilities in San Jose and Oakland which would make it one of the widest spread games ever and considering some of the international cities San Francisco might be competing against this might be the greatest achillies heel

San Francisco is one of the smallest major cities (something like 43.7 sq.miles) that of course it would eventually have to include neighboring cities in its bid for something like an Olympic Games. But with BART, the distances between downtown SF-Oakland-Berkeley are so manageable.

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As for San Francisco, although there are some iconic images of the city, suggestions I have seen include incorporating facilities in San Jose and Oakland which would make it one of the widest spread games ever and considering some of the international cities San Francisco might be competing against this might be the greatest achillies heel

The whole concept of spread out vs. compact tends to get a little over-blown here. As does the geography of what a city's borders are. The key question is everything accessible? London has 1 of the best public transportation systems in the world, so as zeke noted, the fact that many of the venues weren't necessarily that clustered together didn't matter so long as they're easy to get to. Ditto for the Bay Area. As long as athletes and spectators can get around easily, being spread out isn't as huge of a negative as it would seem

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Saying "Back to topic" is not the same as trying to take a thread back to topic. Posting something relevant to the topic is trying to take a thread back to topic. Saying you want to argue is not relevant to the topic. I just posted something about SF 2024. Look forward to your thoughts on that.

* saying you don't want to arugue

Well, take Your own advice and drop it, instead of keep trying to have the last word.

Back on Topic.

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No need to be rude. You started this by 'Correcting' My origional Post, when I said Full Stop, when Full Stop is the Correct way of saying it here in England. I responded the wrong way, but You started this.

Full Stop is how we say . here in England. End of argument. Let's move on.

Okay, I must take responsibility for this. I knew this would gauge a reaction from you and that was wrong.

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San Francisco is one of the smallest major cities (something like 43.7 sq.miles) that of course it would eventually have to include neighboring cities in its bid for something like an Olympic Games. But with BART, the distances between downtown SF-Oakland-Berkeley are so manageable.

I'm actually going to side with you on this one. I mean it is unrealistic that the games could be in San Francisco, San Francisco and going outside of the city proper for some venues really would not be that terrible in my opinion. I mean look at London and Sydney, their main clusters were still far from the city center. As long as you have a few venues in the city proper, a strong set of venues, and the means to quickly and easily transport the athletes then you should be good. Government and public support is what will hurt them.

The whole concept of spread out vs. compact tends to get a little over-blown here. As does the geography of what a city's borders are. The key question is everything accessible? London has 1 of the best public transportation systems in the world, so as zeke noted, the fact that many of the venues weren't necessarily that clustered together didn't matter so long as they're easy to get to. Ditto for the Bay Area. As long as athletes and spectators can get around easily, being spread out isn't as huge of a negative as it would seem

Yes. I'm not too familiar with the Bay Area's public transport, is it good or would it need work?

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Well, take Your own advice and drop it, instead of keep trying to have the last word.

Back on Topic.

This looks very much on getting back on topic if you ask me:

The whole concept of spread out vs. compact tends to get a little over-blown here. As does the geography of what a city's borders are. The key question is everything accessible? London has 1 of the best public transportation systems in the world, so as zeke noted, the fact that many of the venues weren't necessarily that clustered together didn't matter so long as they're easy to get to. Ditto for the Bay Area. As long as athletes and spectators can get around easily, being spread out isn't as huge of a negative as it would seem

Anyways, I think SF has some solid public transit. I've only been on the tourist trap that is the cable car, but some Googling brings up the SF Muni, which is very, very long statistically. BART is also very notable. From what I read, both are very reliable and extensive (Based on the map, I think BART reaches to San Jose, Oakland, Berkeley , etc) . I remember my English textbook even used the BART system as an example (I don't remember what for, though)

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Yes. I'm not too familiar with the Bay Area's public transport, is it good or would it need work?

I think it's good for what it needs to be on a day-to-day basis. Not sure how well it would serve an Olympics though. Like woohoo, I'm not that familiar with the system, but I think it depends where the venues are. The Oakland Coliseum is right on a BART stop. AT&T Park is accessible via MUNI. I know there's CalTrain that goes out to San Jose and the Silicon Valley area. So if the Bay Area wants an Olympics, they either need to improve the system or situate venues close to public transportation. Not sure how well those 2 would mesh.

Again, this is where compact vs. not as compact needs to take a back seat to accessibility. Put venues out wherever they need to be so long as people can easily get to them. Yes, if some are too far flung that's an issue, but I think they can find the right balance of suitable locations vs. compactness to make it acceptable.

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Last week on Halloween, on the day of the Giants' victory parade in downtown SF, the BART system clocked 500,000 passenger rides, the 3rd highest day in its history. The BART system is expanding to San Jose; so yes, BART would be the lifeline of a SF Olympics. And people here will say, what about the crush on game days? Remember that business will probably have staggered hours, people will telecommute for work or go on vacation, so the lesser regular numbers would be compensated for by the additional Olympics-only crowd. In other words, the BART system can handle a 21st century Olympic Games.

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BART by my experience is efficient, frequent and reliable. It's only drawback is its network and lines aren't as extensive as New York, London or even Sydney's rail transit networks. But then again, it's also complemented (at least I know on the SF side of the Bay), by a very extensive and comprehensive MUNI network. In truth, I think SF's one of the more transit friendly cities I've travelled through in the US. I'd count it as a strength for SF's hopes.

I've used BART from Oakland (or rather Hayward) to downtown SF, and it really is analogous, or even a bit easier than, central London to Stratford or downtown Sydney to Olympic Park. Berkeley and San Jose are a bit more of a trek, but again, not ridiculously so compared to sone of the other outer satellite venues used in both Sydney or London (rowing or canoeing anyone?) either. Honestly, I do think a bit too much is being made of a Bay Area bid being "too spread out".

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Last week on Halloween, on the day of the Giants' victory parade in downtown SF, the BART system clocked 500,000 passenger rides, the 3rd highest day in its history. The BART system is expanding to San Jose; so yes, BART would be the lifeline of a SF Olympics. And people here will say, what about the crush on game days? Remember that business will probably have staggered hours, people will telecommute for work or go on vacation, so the lesser regular numbers would be compensated for by the additional Olympics-only crowd. In other words, the BART system can handle a 21st century Olympic Games.

Easier said than done. The majority of those folks at the parade were locals. Little more difficult to manage when more of the crowd is full of out-of-towners. That said, the system should be able to handle the crunch, but it will help matters greatly if venues are near public transportation. They could make this work, they just need to find locations for everything that make sense for the crowds they'll get for an Olympics.

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BART by my experience is efficient, frequent and reliable. It's only drawback is its network and lines aren't as extensive as New York, London or even Sydney's rail transit networks. But then again, it's also complemented (at least I know on the SF side of the Bay), by a very extensive and comprehensive MUNI network. In truth, I think SF's one of the more transit friendly cities I've travelled through in the US. I'd count it as a strength for SF's hopes.

I've used BART from Oakland (or rather Hayward) to downtown SF, and it really is analogous, or even a bit easier than, central London to Stratford or downtown Sydney to Olympic Park. Berkeley and San Jose are a bit more of a trek, but again, not ridiculously so compared to sone of the other outer satellite venues used in both Sydney or London (rowing or canoeing anyone?) either. Honestly, I do think a bit too much is being made of a Bay Area bid being "too spread out".

Easier said than done. The majority of those folks at the parade were locals. Little more difficult to manage when more of the crowd is full of out-of-towners. That said, the system should be able to handle the crunch, but it will help matters greatly if venues are near public transportation. They could make this work, they just need to find locations for everything that make sense for the crowds they'll get for an Olympics.

The real problem with BART is no express trains like I never understood why they left that out. It is a far easier system to navigate than the NYC Subway or the Tube which require you leaving the platform and walking somewhere else where is you need to Transfer with BART it's a simple walk across the platform with 2 trains there at the same time people transferring to the one to San Francisco and Lower East Bay. I think a quicker ride can be made in 10 years definitely and the system is improving greatly. It's not as amazing as the NYC Subway but it's reliable and much easier

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