Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It will become very interesting how the IOC will handle this bid process - I think it will become exciting since the IOC didn't adopted this agenda just for fun...

The IOC made changes because they desperately needed to change their public image. Remains to be seen whether or not they'll practice what they preach. So we may or may not know much before we see the results of that vote in 2017

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

/\/\ They should have an alternate scenario with a 2028 delivery time. Still, it seems to be a very problematic site.

From the article..

City officials had been looking at a completion date for the rail yard project of 2033, depending on federal funding and other factors. But those assumptions were upended this summer, after Los Angeles re-entered the running for the 2024 Olympics.

In the initial bidding materials, L.A.'s Olympic committee identified the rail yard as the site of a new residential village that would house 16,500 athletes. Now, backers of the river say the Olympic Village concept could achieve another goal: building the most complicated piece of the 11.5-mile restoration, years ahead of schedule.

Seems like 2028 is already a realistic timetable, moreso than trying for 2024.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If there is a compelling reason to do it by 2024 it'll happen. we are talking about the premier city In a state who's economy is larger than most countries.

somebody has to be ready if Europe implodes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And why would Europe "implode". For all we know, L.A. could be the one to 'implode'.

Anything can happen, and something unexpected probably will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If there is a compelling reason to do it by 2024 it'll happen. we are talking about the premier city In a state who's economy is larger than most countries.

somebody has to be ready if Europe implodes.

You mean like 2022? Where every European bidder dropped out, leaving us with giant douche and turd sandwich?

California's economy may be big, but up until recently, it wasn't all that healthy. Just because it's big, doesn't mean they're necessarily ready, willing, and able to spend big on something like the Olympics.

Anything can happen, and something unexpected probably will.

Don't hide behind that type of argument. LA isn't going to fast-track a project just to be in position if they win the 2024 bid. That's why there are 7 years worth of lead-up to get prepared. To that end..

LA truly is ready to host a world event. 2024, 2028, or 2032. The story will only be getting better.

They can get ready in 7 years, no question. Just be careful of the illusion that LA would be prepared to host a full-scale world class Olympics in a shorter amount of time than that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or does the "to be built in 2033" looks like there are several years of meandering involved? 18 years seems like a long time for almost any project.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or does the "to be built in 2033" looks like there are several years of meandering involved? 18 years seems like a long time for almost any project.

You don't know much about urban planning, do you. The article said "completion date." As in when the entire project will be completed. Yes it's a long time, but it's also talking about federal funding. Not an easy thing to get.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't know much about urban planning, do you. The article said "completion date." As in when the entire project will be completed. Yes it's a long time, but it's also talking about federal funding. Not an easy thing to get.

18 years is still waaaayy to long for housing blocks that (I'm guessing)

Will not have much parliamentary funding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't know much about urban planning, do you. The article said "completion date." As in when the entire project will be completed. Yes it's a long time, but it's also talking about federal funding. Not an easy thing to get.

But the main reason why cities agree to host the Olympics these days is to screw money out of every source possible for redevelopment, with an absolutely fixed completion date.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

18 years is still waaaayy to long for housing blocks that (I'm guessing)

Will not have much parliamentary funding.

18 years for a large Urban development project is normal, most plan 20 to 30 year masterplans.

They have to acknowledge that all the money will not be there upfront and that it will take time for the overall vision to grow. True communities grow, they can not be manufactured.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
USOC returns to Boston for Road to Rio event

“I do think the USOC really trashed the Olympic brand in Massachusetts and in Boston,” said Evan Falchuk, a former candidate for governor who was leading the drive for a ballot question that would have barred the state from using public funds in support of the 2024 games, had the bid gone forward.

Falchuk and other critics contended that the USOC forced Boston 2024, the private group spearheading Boston’s Olympic bid, to shield details of its bid from the public and later pressured city officials to sign an agreement that could have left taxpayers holding the bag for future cost overruns.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That video is dead, so you can find the original podcast here:

https://soundcloud.com/the-bill-simmons-podcast/ep-9-casey-wasserman

I have to say, he sounds much more circumspect and realistic than I thought he would. There's little jingoism and a much more pragmatic perspective of needing to win over the IOC voters. His comment about having basketball in Sacramento is not as pleasing, though, and is a hint that they are overstating their venue situation with the claim that they have everything they could want in Los Angeles.

Edited by Nacre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one thing the Olympics never struggle to do is to sell tickets. That is not a concern, and should not motivate them to locate events in Sacramento or San Francisco.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sacramento is more than 350 miles from Los Angeles, further than London to Paris. It may result in more seating is the organizers spread the venues around the state, but the logistical issues of shuttling athletes around is not worth it for a relatively modest gain in seating capacity. Moreover, if they do not need any public money, why should they care what people in Northern California want?

Los Angeles has a number of great arenas, but they don't want to build anything new like London did or Paris is planning to do. And that means dealing with a number of sub-optimal issues like putting swimming in a soccer stadium and having the field hockey in a stadium with a track in it, as well as counting on private parties to voluntarily upgrade their facilities at their own expense. It seems unclear if UCLA and USC are going to want to spend millions upgrading a facility for their rowing teams, for example.

For me this is a sign of the LA 2024 team doing their due diligence in preparing for the outcome that the area's private parties don't pay to upgrade their arenas. If UCLA is not willing to spend millions to upgrade their arena, then basketball might have to be moved to San Francisco or Sacramento. That shows that the organizing committee is well prepared, but it also shows that they are dependent on a lot of private parties who may or not be willing to make sacrifices for the Olympics.

Edited by Nacre

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Los Angeles has a number of great arenas, but they don't want to build anything new like London did or Paris is planning to do. And that means dealing with a number of sub-optimal issues like putting swimming in a soccer stadium and having the field hockey in a stadium with a track in it, as well as counting on private parties to voluntarily upgrade their facilities at their own expense. It seems unclear if UCLA and USC are going to want to spend millions upgrading a facility for their rowing teams, for example.

For me this is a sign of the LA 2024 team doing their due diligence in preparing for the outcome that the area's private parties don't pay to upgrade their arenas. If UCLA is not willing to spend millions to upgrade their arena, then basketball might have to be moved to San Francisco or Sacramento. That shows that the organizing committee is well prepared, but it also shows that they are dependent on a lot of private parties who may or not be willing to make sacrifices for the Olympics.

Los Angeles has so many arena's that they do not need to build anything. Almost every arena is 10k+, with most at 18k+. It has been noted that there are still some 18k+ arenas that haven't been picked for the Olympics because their are too many. The only reason for a move to Sacramento would be for a boost to state-wide poll numbers.

Talking about the swimming arena, it is a new deal and not many details have come out yet. I did some calculations and while a soccer pitch is too big for a swimming pool. With added seats it is doable. As for the hockey arena, they will probably change it at a later date.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talking about the swimming arena, it is a new deal and not many details have come out yet. I did some calculations and while a soccer pitch is too big for a swimming pool. With added seats it is doable.

See Kazan?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honda Center - Opened 1993

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Center

Galen Center - Opened 2006

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galen_Center

Citizens Bank Arena - Opened 2008

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens_Business_Bank_Arena

Pauley Pavillion - Renovated 2012

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauley_Pavilion

The Forum - Renovated 2012

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Forum_(Inglewood)

These are already completed projects. USC's 500 million renovation to the Coliseum (their main stadium) has been in the works prior to LA bidding and temporary swim stadiums are already proven in LA. LA is really facing one hurdle and that is where to place an athletes village. But that hurdle is significantly reduced because LA has a huge housing shortage.

Honda Center - Opened 1993

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Center

Galen Center - Opened 2006

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galen_Center

Citizens Bank Arena - Opened 2008

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens_Business_Bank_Arena

Pauley Pavillion - Renovated 2012

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauley_Pavilion

The Forum - Renovated 2012

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Forum_(Inglewood)

These are already completed projects. USC's 500 million renovation to the Coliseum (their main stadium) has been in the works prior to LA bidding and temporary swim stadiums are already proven in LA. LA is really facing one hurdle and that is where to place an athletes village. But that hurdle is significantly reduced because LA has a huge housing shortage.

Well public transportation is probably an even bigger hurdle. It's complete crap in LA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well public transportation is probably an even bigger hurdle. It's complete crap in LA.

Compared to New York yes. It's a LOT better than it was in 1984, though.

Honda Center - Opened 1993

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Center

Galen Center - Opened 2006

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galen_Center

Citizens Bank Arena - Opened 2008

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens_Business_Bank_Arena

Pauley Pavillion - Renovated 2012

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauley_Pavilion

The Forum - Renovated 2012

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Forum_(Inglewood)

These are already completed projects. USC's 500 million renovation to the Coliseum (their main stadium) has been in the works prior to LA bidding and temporary swim stadiums are already proven in LA. LA is really facing one hurdle and that is where to place an athletes village. But that hurdle is significantly reduced because LA has a huge housing shortage.

Los Angeles has a lot of big arenas, but it is not going to build a huge new convention center and temporary arenas like London did and Paris is presumably planning to do. I am NOT saying that Los Angeles does not have enough venues to go around, but rather that they are going to have to do some creative shuffling of venues.

Los Angeles does not have "everything it needs to host" already in place like some people are saying. They are going to have to push for venue improvements/expansions and re-purpose some venues for other sports.

USC's plans for the Memorial Stadium are a good example. What happens to this bid if USC decides not to upgrade the stadium in time for the Olympics?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Los Angeles has a lot of big arenas, but it is not going to build a huge new convention center and temporary arenas like London did and Paris is presumably planning to do. I am NOT saying that Los Angeles does not have enough venues to go around, but rather that they are going to have to do some creative shuffling of venues.

I've done my research.

London, the most recent Olympic host had 11 indoor arenas (which are all indoor-sport arenas and all convention centre arenas, excluding velodrome and aquatics centres which have different venue requirements) which are the most expensive part of any bid. Rio has the same amount of arenas. The Los Angeles bid has 14 indoor arenas, almost half are around 18k.

Los Angeles does not have "everything it needs to host" already in place like some people are saying. They are going to have to push for venue improvements/expansions and re-purpose some venues for other sports.

Again pretty much false.

The only thing Los Angeles will need to build is a renovated velodrome. Every single sport will take place in a stadium that is perfect for it besides the already mention hockey and fencing. Fencing has its own 4-thousand seat venue for the first stage of the competition but the bid uses the iconic Microsoft Theater for the finals because of its international appeal. All other venues (including the soccer stadium) will be perfect for the games and almost all do not need expansion or renovation. Besides the Aquatics stadium, the most repurposing you'll see is the change of a basketball venue to a handball venue or gymnastics venue.

USC's plans for the Memorial Stadium are a good example. What happens to this bid if USC decides not to upgrade the stadium in time for the Olympics?

I'm sorry to be harsh but really? They've got 9 years to finalise plans for an upgrade to a stadium. And they get 500m of government funding for free. If they don't pay this 300m they lose 500m in upgrades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing Los Angeles will need to build is a renovated velodrome. Every single sport will take place in a stadium that is perfect for it besides the already mention hockey and fencing. Fencing has its own 4-thousand seat venue for the first stage of the competition but the bid uses the iconic Microsoft Theater for the finals because of its international appeal. All other venues (including the soccer stadium) will be perfect for the games and almost all do not need expansion or renovation. Besides the Aquatics stadium, the most repurposing you'll see is the change of a basketball venue to a handball venue or gymnastics venue.

I'm sorry to be harsh but really? They've got 9 years to finalise plans for an upgrade to a stadium. And they get 500m of government funding for free. If they don't pay this 300m they lose 500m in upgrades.

Enlighten me here.. what stadium does LA have that's perfect for athletics? Because it's not the Coliseum. It will require an extensive renovation to make it friendly for athletics once again and that renovation will likely run counter to what is in the best interests of USC for their football program. And considering a lot of this is hinging on an Olympic BID (as opposed to having already won the vote), that changes the equation of how USC is going to proceed on this one. So you can say that this plan is already in the works, but this is still a major undertaking that shouldn't be discounted as part of the overall cost of bidding for and potentially hosting the Olympics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Enlighten me here.. what stadium does LA have that's perfect for athletics? Because it's not the Coliseum. It will require an extensive renovation to make it friendly for athletics once again and that renovation will likely run counter to what is in the best interests of USC for their football program. And considering a lot of this is hinging on an Olympic BID (as opposed to having already won the vote), that changes the equation of how USC is going to proceed on this one. So you can say that this plan is already in the works, but this is still a major undertaking that shouldn't be discounted as part of the overall cost of bidding for and potentially hosting the Olympics.

See Hampden Park, which had a 1 million dollar track laid before the games that can be removed afterwards. And in terms of an OG 1million is absolutely nothing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think unless the basketball tournament gets expanded, there won't be any games held in Sacramento, Oakland, or any other far off city. Pauley Pavilion has 12,000 and it's a legendary venue in its own right. I think you also have to factor in the City of Champions project in Inglewood which would include a retractable roof stadium for a new NFL team. There's really no need to go outside of Los Angeles, even to Anaheim for basketball. And in terms of capacity, I believe Rio's secondary venue is only like 7,000.

The one venue that I think needs to be reconsidered is the water polo venue. Why use the L.A. Tennis Center, spend who knows how much on converting it temporarily, when L.A. could just use the 1984 Swim Stadium that they originally proposed in their first 2024 bid plan?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×