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Los Angeles To Bid For 2024 Summer Olympics


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Nobody can deny there's a serious earthquake risk for LA.

Then again, using this argument against LA while the latest city selected by the IOC is under the exactly same risk makes it look very hollow. This s obviously not an IOC concern (otherwise Athens, Beijing and Vancouver wouldn't have hosted either, even Sochi).

I completely agree with that statement.

Most Countries have some sort of risk of having an Earthquake. It's not an IOC concern, as Stefan pointed out.

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IOC awards Japan a couple years after one of their worst seismic events and Los Angeles should refrain from bidding because of a quake that never happened... Not much logic here guys.

SCCOG will poke fun at this nonsense with a 'Los Angeles 2024: stir the soul, stir the city.'

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If LA is to concerned that their infrastructure will be destroyed due to earthquakes, then they can put their stadiums in rollers, it might be more money but ensures safety. I just stayed in Santa Monica and my hotel was on rollers, it will be safe up to a 8.2 or 8.1

How exactly do you put a stadium on rollers?

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How exactly do you put a stadium on rollers?

Exactly as you would any other structure. California's building code is a lot more stringent than any other state in the country when it comes to earthquake safety. I'm sure that any stadium to be built would be constructed to the highest possible standards of safety and with the best known engineering practices. I'm pretty sure that if the 49ers can build a new stadium in Santa Clara (a whole lot closer to the epicenter of the '89 Loma Prieta quake than Candlestick Point) and no one worries about the earthquake safety that a soccer stadium in LA can also be built with the same skill.

Look, the bottom line, as anyone who has ever lived anywhere in California can tell you, is that both LA and the Bay Area are littered with faults, running through major population centers. Seismologists are constantly discovering that those faults don't operate the way they've been previously theorized. And, while the science is learning all sorts of new things about earthquakes and faults, no one has yet to figure out how to predict them. Yes, there are some amazing technologies that allow some small bit of advance warning (as we were able to witness in Japan three years ago) but the fact is, no one knows when another one, a big one, THE big one, will strike, and the best you can do is just live with it, prepare to the best of your ability and construct the strongest, most flexible buildings possible. Having lived in both California (I remember Loma Prieta quite vividly) and in Virginia (college for four years - lovely brick buildings, American gothic style and quite likely to sustain damage in an earthquake), I can assure you, I'd feel a lot safer attending an Olympics in California than I would almost anywhere else in the country if the biggest risk and concern anyone had was a potential earthquake, of any magnitude.

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The reality is that you cannot shy away from any host city because there's a chance a natural disaster MIGHT strike. You can't live in fear of something that may never even happen.

"The Big One" has been rumored to be right around the corner for decades. I've heard about it my entire life. If it ever happens, LA will deal with it. As someone said, hosting Olympics could provide the perfect impetus for rebuilding as well as a great story and legacy for the Games.

As far as a bid is concerned, I think it's a non-issue.

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Exactly as you would any other structure. California's building code is a lot more stringent than any other state in the country when it comes to earthquake safety. I'm sure that any stadium to be built would be constructed to the highest possible standards of safety and with the best known engineering practices. I'm pretty sure that if the 49ers can build a new stadium in Santa Clara (a whole lot closer to the epicenter of the '89 Loma Prieta quake than Candlestick Point) and no one worries about the earthquake safety that a soccer stadium in LA can also be built with the same skill.

Look, the bottom line, as anyone who has ever lived anywhere in California can tell you, is that both LA and the Bay Area are littered with faults, running through major population centers. Seismologists are constantly discovering that those faults don't operate the way they've been previously theorized. And, while the science is learning all sorts of new things about earthquakes and faults, no one has yet to figure out how to predict them. Yes, there are some amazing technologies that allow some small bit of advance warning (as we were able to witness in Japan three years ago) but the fact is, no one knows when another one, a big one, THE big one, will strike, and the best you can do is just live with it, prepare to the best of your ability and construct the strongest, most flexible buildings possible. Having lived in both California (I remember Loma Prieta quite vividly) and in Virginia (college for four years - lovely brick buildings, American gothic style and quite likely to sustain damage in an earthquake), I can assure you, I'd feel a lot safer attending an Olympics in California than I would almost anywhere else in the country if the biggest risk and concern anyone had was a potential earthquake, of any magnitude.

It should go without saying that any large structure in Los Angeles will be built with safety standards in mind. There have been plenty of sports facilities built in the area in recent years, so this would hardly be something new for them.

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How exactly do you put a stadium on rollers?

Technology is out there to do this, I'm not a earthquake specialist obviously, but if tokyo can build there giant skyscrapers on rollers, I'm sure you can build a stadium on rollers. And also it was just a "you could always" not LA should do this
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Technology is out there to do this, I'm not a earthquake specialist obviously, but if tokyo can build there giant skyscrapers on rollers, I'm sure you can build a stadium on rollers. And also it was just a "you could always" not LA should do this

Skyscrapers don't have the same sized-footprint as a stadium. You can't compare 1 to the other. Any sports facility built in LA is obviously going to have earthquake protection in mind, but I'd stop short of "my hotel was on rollers, you could always put a stadium on rollers."

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1. It's even more seismically volatile as ever

I dunno man, I'm in the LA area and the earthquakes, to me, are no more than a nuisance. I mean that 5.1 earthquake that happened a few weeks ago left little to no damage to my area, despite being in such close proximity. If we were to experience the "big one" I'm pretty sure we'd be able to rebuild. I've never put much thought into the possibilities of a natural disaster. Also, i'm not sure you can claim the drought would still be present a decade later (it sounds very extreme).

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I'm not sure why we are even talking about this, Los Angeles (structurally) is probably the safest city in the US. All buildings are constructed to strict standards and evaluation. They recognize 'The Big One' could happen at any time, and they have prepared. Like I said earlier, if 'The Big One' did happen this year minimal damage would occur and it would get the whole nation on board with the bid.

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That is actually a really good point bernham, if a devastating earthquake (god forbid) happens near the La metro area, then the nation will get on board with the bid because they will see that LA needs the Olympics.

Not that, we will feel bad about the city. It would be like if 9/11 happened during the 2012 race, it's not that we think that city needs them. Instead we feel sympathy and want to show the world that we as a nation will rise above all obstacles.

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