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Pools need a certain depth for safety on the dive in at the beginning of the swim races, and for turns.

Since the main pool has always been used for international Fina events I doubt that's the issue, but yes maybe at the Rachel Finlayson pool which is a public non competitive pool.

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  • 2 months later...

So the 71 commonwealth member nations have started to arrive for personal inspections. This week is Africa/Asia, next week Europe/Oceania and the week after The Americas.

The evaluation commission will release their report of their April visit and subsequent findings on 31st July

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So the 71 commonwealth member nations have started to arrive for personal inspections. This week is Africa/Asia, next week Europe/Oceania and the week after The Americas.

The evaluation commission will release their report of their April visit and subsequent findings on 31st July

lol at the CGFs due process... like the dorks have a choice.

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So the plan is to build the Athletes Village in Cornubia, a massive new development node to the north of the city. It is about 10mins from the airport, 5mins from the uMhlanga business/tourism node, 20mins from the Kings Park node and on a site next to the Marshall Dam. The R1.5bn cost will be bourne by the national housing department and the units will be sold post the games. The setting though looks great from these plans and will really rocket forward the residential components of mid market Cornubia as a big legacy project.

CKmYWdDUsAApNua.jpg

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With about a month to go until the announcement and all the visits complete, the Durban team today released loads of venue plan photos on their Facebook account. I won't post them all here, so go take a look there, but some key, iconic ones here. Important to note the only new facilities to be built are the IBC, Athletes Village and Shooting facilities. The others are all upgrades or existing facilities

Moses Mabhida with track and 85000 seating, with the added seats on level 3.

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Beach Volleyball

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Swimming

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Hockey

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Marathon through CBD

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Shooting facilities on the Bluff

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New building for IBC next to existing TV studios and also next to the International convention Centre and Kingsmead stadium

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The Athletes Village

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11729009_964933946860367_212019804296843

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Durban 2022’s Bid Preparations Enter Final Straight as Evaluation Report Published


3 August 2015
For immediate release

With less than a month to go before Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) members vote to award the hosting rights to the XXII Commonwealth Games, the formal evaluation of Durban’s bid has been published. The report recommends that the CGF General Assembly votes to award the 2022 Commonwealth Games to the Host City of Durban, South Africa.

To view the report, please follow this link (pdf, 3Mb): http://www.thecgf.com/games/2022/2022-EC-Report.pdf

The report of the CGF Evaluation Commission, chaired by CGF Honorary Secretary Louise Martin CBE, is the outcome of detailed independent consideration of Durban’s Candidate City File (submitted on 2 March 2015), on-site meetings and detailed review workshops with Durban 2022 and its government and city partners. For the first time, and consistent with Transformation 2022, the CGF’s new strategic plan, the Evaluation Commission also mapped out a range of key steps to be taken by Durban 2022 and the CGF during the first 90 and 180 days after the vote.

Evaluation Commission Chair, Louise Martin CBE, said: “The sole focus on Durban 2022 has enabled the Evaluation Commission to undertake a constructive and collaborative, rather than simply comparative, assessment of Durban and South Africa’s inspiring ambition to host the first Commonwealth Games on African soil.

We have also worked closely with Durban 2022, their public authorities and political leaders to craft the beginnings of an effective and pragmatic delivery partnership. We all have much work to do and the CGF’s intention is to follow its strategic directions, as outlined in Transformation 2022, and be an active and value-adding partner to Durban 2022”.

The report, distributed to CGF members earlier today, Monday 3 August, commends and highlights the many positive impacts of Durban’s bid for the Games. Durban’s vision supports and contributes to South Africa’s 2030 National Development Plan and is rooted in the desire to engage citizens (especially young people), athletes and the Commonwealth. The Games concept features a compact venue plan centred around the sporting super-precinct of the Moses Mabhida Stadium and adjacent coastline, providing excellent opportunities for innovative sport presentation and enhanced athlete experience. The Opening Ceremony would take place on a national holiday, Mandela Day (Monday 18 July, 2022).

The Evaluation Commission Report also highlights a range of initial actions to be taken by Durban 2022 and the CGF. These recommendations, developed with Durban 2022, augment the initial bid proposition and reinforce delivery of a world-class Commonwealth Games in an inspiring and exciting host city and country.

Louise Martin continued: “We are 95% there, and very close to the finish line. We thank our colleagues in Durban and South Africa for their passion, ambition and assurances that many of our comments and requirements will be actioned in time for the vote. It is our recommendation that the CGF General Assembly votes to award the 2022 Commonwealth Games to the Host City of Durban, South Africa, but subject to the final and timely delivery of a limited number of outstanding Host City Contract requirements”.

The CGF Evaluation Commission analysed the Candidature File submitted by Durban on 2 March, and made on-site inspections from 27 to 30 April. In collaboration with the bid team, the Evaluation Commission examined the 12 themes of the CGF’s candidature questionnaire, which includes topics such as vision, venues, legacy, transport, finance and sustainability.

In addition to the Chair, Louise Martin, the Evaluation Commission also comprises David Grevemberg, Chief Executive, Commonwealth Games Federation; Andrew Ryan, Executive Director, ASOIF (The Association of Summer Olympic International Federations) and former Glasgow 2014 and current Gold Coast 2018 Coordination Commission member; Ian Hooper, Director of Sport and Infrastructure, Glasgow Life and Maxwell de Silva, Secretary General, Sri Lankan Commonwealth Games Association.

Regional clusters of Commonwealth Games Associations have also recently carried out their own inbound visits to Durban to experience first-hand the Games preparations, venues and infrastructure and to inform their vote, which takes place at the CGF General Assembly on 2 September, in Auckland, New Zealand.


ENDS

http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=f10a798540c235ff87d5c474b&id=e2f99eaebf

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  • 4 weeks later...

Just thinking that at one point, everyone thought Durban wouldn't stand a chance because they took long to announce their bid logo. Now, they are the only bidder after Edmonton left.

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Just thinking that at one point, everyone thought Durban wouldn't stand a chance because they took long to announce their bid logo. Now, they are the only bidder after Edmonton left.

And everybody thought that for very good reasons (and I don't think they said Durban didn't stand any chance, just that they were slipping behind). And who knows what would have happened had Edmonton stayed in the race. The fact was, that for a long time, Durban seemed to be doing nothing. And it wasn't just bid logo - it was everything, even including an official commitment by the government to bid. Even now they still don't seem very enthusiastic. Edmonton was making all the running while SA dithered. Yes, that changed, but the dynamics of every bid race change through the process as events happen.

Just quit with all the "I was right" bulls!t. You've only been right through dumb luck, certainly not through any insightful analysis. Like your beloved "The IOC made the right choice" Beijing. They had no chance until Munich... and Switzerland... and Sweden... and Norway... and Poland decided to drop out. And even then, all that was needed was two votes to change, a few more IOC members to turn up or members being allowed to visit Almaty before voting, and Beijing 2022 could have well been Peking Duck.

Edited by Sir Rols
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See I see it very differently. Just because you and others buy into show pony tactics, doesn't mean others don't just get on with the task at hand. That's what the Durban bid team were doing all along. I rave is won at a vote, whether you convince 5mins before is irrelevant, its the substance that matters.

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And everybody thought that for very good reasons (and I don't think they said Durban didn't stand any chance, just that they were slipping behind). And who knows what would have happened had Edmonton stayed in the race. The fact was, that for a long time, Durban seemed to be doing nothing. And it wasn't just bid logo - it was everything, even including an official commitment by the government to bid. Even now they still don't seem very enthusiastic. Edmonton was making all the running while SA dithered. Yes, that changed, but the dynamics of every bid race change through the process as events happen.

Just quit with all the "I was right" bulls!t. You've only been right through dumb luck, certainly not through any insightful analysis. Like your beloved "The IOC made the right choice" Beijing. They had no chance until Munich... and Switzerland... and Sweden... and Norway... and Poland decided to drop out. And even then, all that was needed was two votes to change, a few more IOC members to turn up or members being allowed to visit Almaty before voting, and Beijing 2022 could have well been Peking Duck.

Once is luck, but I predicted Beijing would beat Almaty and Beijing beat Almaty. I predicted Durban would host, Durban will host. Stockholm would have hosted instead of Beijing if they didn't quit the bidding.

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Tony I secretly got excited not seeing you for months. Let out to play again?

Moving on... The government today gave full backing and signed the required financial support docs, so that hurdle out the way

No need for a negative first comment.

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