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Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370


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This is unfair. This event is completely unprecedented. The only reason "first world" nations became involved in the limited way they did (by that I mean Australia, the US and NZ's plane) is because i

Or Kuala Lumpur Pop: 1.6 million (5.7 mil in urban area) HDI 0.795 (high) One of the best urban road networks in Asia Kuala Lumpur International Airport: Capacity of 40 million (current handles 3

It seems people forgot the 1998 Commonwealth Games on which they did a great job being the first Asian city to host it (unlike Delhi which screwed things up), so this situation is not enough to say th

/\/\ I could've told them that the moment it washed up on the beach. Duh!! But it still doesn't rule out the possibility that the jet could've been sucked up by aliens, does it??? <_<

Yeah because a flaperon is of no use for sophisticated aliens who can suck up planes just like that anyway.

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A suggestion has been made for Australia and New Zealand to check their uninhabited coastlines and even their isolated sub-Antarctic islands of anything since the search area has moved towards the area that the ocean current that washed up the MH370 part does flow through the region.

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  • 4 weeks later...

French investigators confirm wing part found on Reunion was from Flight MH370

The wing part, known as a flaperon, was found on the shore of the French-governed island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean on July 29. It was examined at a French aeronautical research laboratory near Toulouse.

Malaysian authorities had already stated that the wing part was from the Boeing 777 that disappeared in 2014. But until Thursday, French investigators had refused to say with certitude whether that was the case.

The Paris prosecutor's office said in a statement on Thursday that investigators used maintenance records to match a serial number found on the wing part with the missing Boeing.

"Today it is possible to state with certitude that the flaperon discovered on Reunion on July 29, 2015 corresponds with that of Flight MH370," the prosecutor's statement confirmed.

The plane disappeared without a trace on March 8, 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew on board. Most of the passengers were from China. The flight changed course and went out over the Indian Ocean before losing all contact with ground control.

das/jm (AP, Reuters, dpa)

http://www.dw.com/en/french-investigators-confirm-wing-part-found-on-reunion-was-from-flight-mh370/a-18692655

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A suggestion has been made for Australia and New Zealand to check their uninhabited coastlines and even their isolated sub-Antarctic islands of anything since the search area has moved towards the area that the ocean current that washed up the MH370 part does flow through the region.

I was looking at a map of where Reunion Island is, and it's not too far away from Madagascar. Shouldn't Africa and Madagascar be looking for washed-up parts since they're the largest land areas closest to where this piece of wreckage was found?

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  • 6 months later...

MH370 search: Mozambique debris 'almost certainly' from missing plane

The transport ministers of Australia and Malaysia say two plane parts found in Mozambique almost certainly came from missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.

The two pieces of debris were found separately by members of the public and were flown to Australia for analysis.

Australian's Darren Chester said the finds were "consistent with drift modelling" of ocean currents.

MH370 vanished in March 2014 with 239 people on board.

It went out of contact while flying from the Malaysian capital Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Satellite data suggests it likely went down in the southern Indian Ocean after veering off course for unknown reasons.

The fate of the plane, its passengers and crew remains one of aviation's biggest unsolved mysteries.

One of the parts retrieved in Mozambique was found on a sandbank by an amateur US investigator in late February. That find prompted a South African tourist to come forward with a piece he found in Mozambique in December.

_88923918_mh370debris.jpg

1. A section of wing called a flaperon, found on Reunion Island in July 2015 - the only piece confirmed to have come from MH370 so far

2. Piece found in Mozambique in December 2015 - "almost certainly" from the plane

3. "No step" piece found in Mozambique in February 2016 - "almost certainly" from the plane

4. Piece with partial Rolls-Royce logo found in March 2016 in South Africa - in the process of being examined

Mr Chester said the investigation team had finished examining the debris and found both were "consistent with panels from a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 aircraft", the same make as the missing plane.

"The analysis has concluded the debris is almost certainly from MH370," he said in a statement, adding that it showed that the vast deep-sea search for the plane in the southern Indian Ocean, being led by Australia, was focusing on the right place.

Malaysia's Transport Minister Liow Tiong Lai later told a news conference that paint samples from the debris indicated they were parts of the missing plane.

"First, the two pieces of debris belong to Boeing 777 parts. Secondly, from the paint and the stencils of these two pieces, it is similar to MAS (Malaysian Airlines) airlines paint. We conclude it is most certain [it] belongs to MH370," he said.

The Australia-led search is scanning the sea floor, much of it previously unmapped, in the hope of locating the wreckage.

Mr Chester said that would continue for now, with 25,000 sq km (10,000 sq miles) of ocean still be to covered.

"We are focused on completing this task and remain hopeful the aircraft will be found."

But the three countries have said that barring significant new evidence, they will end the operation once the area has been fully searched. The search is expected to be completed in the coming months.

Meanwhile, officials are arranging to collect and examine a fourth piece of debris, found at Mossel Bay in South Africa's southern coast on Monday by a local archaeologist.

It apparently bears a part of the logo of Rolls Royce, the British company which manufactures engines for aircraft including the Boeing 777.

Malaysia says it is awaiting permission from South Africa to conduct a search of its coast for more debris.

BBC

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-35888405

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  • 7 months later...

MH370: New report indicates missing plane was in 'uncontrolled descent' when it crashed

 

An aircraft wing flap sits inside the offices of transport authorities.
 
It is unlikely the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 was in a controlled descent when it crashed into the Indian Ocean, according to

a new report by Australian investigators.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) report released today, stated the debris found was "consistent with the aircraft being in a high and increasing rate of descent".

In particular investigators found the outboard flap from the right wing of the plane, which washed up near Tanzania, was likely "in the retracted position".

Greg Hood from the ATSB said that indicated the passenger plane "wasn't configured for landing or ditching".

"You can never be 100 per cent [sure] and we are very reluctant to express absolute certainty, but that's the most likely scenario," he said.

"You can draw you own conclusions as to whether that means someone was in control or not."

The findings provide the clearest picture of the missing plane's last moments to date.

...

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-02/mh370-unlikely-in-controlled-decent-when-it-crashed-report-finds/7988670

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On 02/11/2016 at 10:41 AM, gotosy said:

Greg Hood from the ATSB said that indicated the passenger plane "wasn't configured for landing or ditching".

"You can never be 100 per cent [sure] and we are very reluctant to express absolute certainty, but that's the most likely scenario," he said.

"You can draw you own conclusions as to whether that means someone was in control or not."

 

Sadly, being in control is not the same as attempting to remain safe.

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