Jump to content

NBC butchers Closing Ceremony Again!


Recommended Posts

I do not understand why NBC keeps tearing the closing ceremonies to pieces so they can show another premiere of some stupid sitcom!! They did not show the final medal ceremony, the piano and circus segments as well as the playing of the Greek and Olympic anthems. Shame on you NBC!! Is it NBC's decision or are the producers of the sitcoms demanding that their show be premiered!! Somebody needs to tell the producers of the sitcoms back off. Maybe it is time for the IOC/USOC to award the rights to another network(ABC/ESPN would be my preference)

Link to post
Share on other sites

And is NBC the one deciding what is boring for the whole country?

No, the viewers are. I read an interview from Mark Lazarus talking about how the speeches at the Opening Ceremony tend to be when ratings drop. In other words, it's when people change the channel to something else. So, NBC does have some sort of baseline of what viewers find boring that doesn't come from people posting on Twitter. Because if we ever started to base decisions on what people say on the Internet, we're doomed as a society. Actions speak louder than words. Not to defend NBC for condensing the Ceremony to fit to time, but if there are portions of it that people aren't interested in watching, I can't entirely fault NBC for deciding to cut them out.

I do not understand why NBC keeps tearing the closing ceremonies to pieces so they can show another premiere of some stupid sitcom!! They did not show the final medal ceremony, the piano and circus segments as well as the playing of the Greek and Olympic anthems. Shame on you NBC!! Is it NBC's decision or are the producers of the sitcoms demanding that their show be premiered!! Somebody needs to tell the producers of the sitcoms back off. Maybe it is time for the IOC/USOC to award the rights to another network(ABC/ESPN would be my preference)

Yea right, that's just what we need, for ESPN to have the Olympics. There are more and bigger headaches that would come with them than you'd get from NBC.

As for the sitcoms.. again, won't defend that. It's a move by a network desperate for ratings to cut their Olympic coverage short and hope those people will stick around for their new shows. It's a network decision moreso than the producers of the shows. But remember that NBC is a business. They will continue to be a business when the Olympics are over. If they feel it's in their best interests to show a half hour less of the Closing Ceremony in premiere a sitcom, I think that's stupid, but I understand why they do it. And so long as they're the network that can generate the highest amount of revenue from the Olympics and drawing the highest viewership (and they are, ESPN isn't even close to matching them in that regard), NBC will continue to win and pay for the rights.

Link to post
Share on other sites

And is NBC the one deciding what is boring for the whole country?

NBC's job is to figure out what large numbers of people will find interesting, and what they will find boring.

You can quibble with their choices, but I have no problem with the conept. Especaily since they make the whole thing available online.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If NBC needed to find time to air their soon-to-be-cancelled new sitcom-- and promos for all sorts of other poor programs-- why didn't they just cut that tired old film about the Kerrigan-Harding war. That story is 20 years old, nobody gives a damn anymore. Yet NBC stole time from the current event, i.e. the closing ceremonies, to rehash the soap opera from the past, that even the principals would like to forget and put behind them.

NBC does, indeed, stink.


Especaily since they make the whole thing available online.

Link? All I can find are a couple of 2 minute highlights.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Link? All I can find are a couple of 2 minute highlights.

It was available live. They're not keeping the whole thing available online. That's too much bandwidth. It should show up again soon. I too missed part of the MUSIC section since I tuned in late to the livestream. But one of these days, a FULL version will appear soon -- as they always do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It was available live. They're not keeping the whole thing available online. That's too much bandwidth. It should show up again soon. I too missed part of the MUSIC section since I tuned in late to the livestream. But one of these days, a FULL version will appear soon -- as they always do.

(sigh).. baron, I know you hate when I have to correct you on these things, but..

CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT

Ironically, I see everything there but the Closing Ceremony even though they said the full replay would be available after the Primetime broadcast ended

CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT
CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT
CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Would an ESPN Olympics suck so much?

IMHO, yes it would. They have too much on their plate in February (mostly college basketball) to shove that all aside for the Olympics. It doesn't fit into their corporate profile all that well when the primary audience for an Olympics doesn't mesh with their usual audience. And that they're a cable network, I think the IOC would have serious reservations about awarding them the contract. I know there's ABC, but they would be a very secondary piece of the puzzle.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

However much they pay it's ridiculous the IOC let NBC get away with this in their showpiece events. It's one thing cutting stuff for commercials or for time, but quite another cutting stuff and shoehorning a premiere of a sitcom in the middle of it. They wouldn't replace the half time show at the Superbowl with a pilot, so why do it with the Olympics.

If organisations like the Masters and various football (soccer, not the stop start **** in North America) and rugby federations can impose fairly stringent conditions on broadcasting events, so can the IOC - and I'm sure a line about not interupting broadcasts of the ceremonies for other programming wouldn't have led to NBC cutting their offer - they were desperate to keep hold of the games at any cost.

Link to post
Share on other sites

(sigh).. baron, I know you hate when I have to correct you on these things, but..

CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT

Ironically, I see everything there but the Closing Ceremony even though they said the full replay would be available after the Primetime broadcast ended

CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT
CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT
CLICK HERE FOR FULL REPLAYS OF EVERY SOCHI EVENT

OK. I don't mind if it's something like this for the common good; and obviously something I missed. It's just there just seemed to be a whole series of corrections, etc., one after another. And thanks for finding that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK. I don't mind if it's something like this for the common good; and obviously something I missed. It's just there just seemed to be a whole series of corrections, etc., one after another. And thanks for finding that.

No problem. NBC's website for this Olympics has been a total mess. I know plenty of people who couldn't find what they were looking for during the Olympics when NBC was promoting all their live video. So now that it's no longer being advertised, it's not all that easy to find the full event replays. Not sure how long NBC will keep everything online. Now that the Olympics are over, you don't have so many people trying to access everything all at once, so it's just a matter of how long before NBC decides to take all the video offline and use that storage space on their servers for something else.

Link to post
Share on other sites

However much they pay it's ridiculous the IOC let NBC get away with this in their showpiece events. It's one thing cutting stuff for commercials or for time, but quite another cutting stuff and shoehorning a premiere of a sitcom in the middle of it. They wouldn't replace the half time show at the Superbowl with a pilot, so why do it with the Olympics.

If organisations like the Masters and various football (soccer, not the stop start **** in North America) and rugby federations can impose fairly stringent conditions on broadcasting events, so can the IOC - and I'm sure a line about not interupting broadcasts of the ceremonies for other programming wouldn't have led to NBC cutting their offer - they were desperate to keep hold of the games at any cost.

What exactly is NBC "getting away" with? The IOC has 2 concerns.. how much money they're getting in rights fees and what the viewership is for the coverage. I'm sure you're going to tell me that NBC's style of coverage is a turn-off, but I doubt the IOC sees it that way. And like I said earlier, there's not another network in the United States that could get the kind of viewership for the Olympics that NBC does, regardless of how much they're paying in rights fees. The IOC has plenty of restrictions on how the rights holders need to cover the Olympics. Whether or not they show the ceremonies in full is not 1 of them. If the IOC were to impose more restrictions on NBC, I believe their offer would have been lower. The IOC should consider themselves fortunate that NBC and Comcast so drastically overbid like the did the last time out that they have nearly an extra billion dollars above what NBC needed to offer to win it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What exactly is NBC "getting away" with? The IOC has 2 concerns.. how much money they're getting in rights fees and what the viewership is for the coverage. I'm sure you're going to tell me that NBC's style of coverage is a turn-off, but I doubt the IOC sees it that way. And like I said earlier, there's not another network in the United States that could get the kind of viewership for the Olympics that NBC does, regardless of how much they're paying in rights fees. The IOC has plenty of restrictions on how the rights holders need to cover the Olympics. Whether or not they show the ceremonies in full is not 1 of them. If the IOC were to impose more restrictions on NBC, I believe their offer would have been lower. The IOC should consider themselves fortunate that NBC and Comcast so drastically overbid like the did the last time out that they have nearly an extra billion dollars above what NBC needed to offer to win it.

I don't buy this at all.

I don't get why you're so gung-ho about NBC in general.

Edited by nykfan845
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't buy this at all.

I don't get why you're so gung-ho about NBC in general.

Ok.. what network can generate higher revenue and more viewership than NBC can? Not ESPN, they're a cable sports network. Fox or CBS? Possibly, but CBS is not interested in the Olympics and Fox has never had an event on this scale before.

Not everyone has an axe to grind with NBC. Covering an Olympics in this country, it's impossible to make everyone happy. There has never been an Olympics without complaints. Yes, even the `84 Summer Olympics on ABC that so many people fondly remember. Knowing what I know about the sports television industry in this country, I'd rather entrust NBC with this responsibility, for all their faults, than 1 of the other options who might do a few things better but would probably do other things a lot worse. And I believe the IOC is very sincere when they talk about what a great partner NBC has been for them over the years, and not just because of the large checks they've written.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it has as much to do, for all of NBC's faults, with its now-long standing broadcasting track record since Seoul 1988, winning so many awards like Emmys and the strong track records for both ratings, quality of, and (most importanty) eagerness or commitment to pay massive amounts of cash to the IOC from the most important Olympic market why the IOC likes NBC so much, especially now with Comcast firmly into it. CBS and Turner Sports could reunite for the Olympics If willing. But where's the committment went after 1998? Its most important joint sports broadcasting project right now is NCAA March Madness, would those be willing to jettison the NBA On TNT on Thursday nights for roughly three weeks? Doubt it now. If they did for the Winter Olympics, it would involve TBS, TNT, and TruTV on the cable side like for the NCAA basketball tournament. CBS doesn't seem interested.

As for ESPN, it would be possible for ESPN to devise multiple temporary Olympic-themed specific TV channels for live and recorded coverage if Viasat, FOXTEL, SKY Sports, SingTel MioTV, Stod 2 Sport, ASTRO, SuperSport, and TrueVisions are indicators from recent Olympics. That way, it would satisfy the Olympics fanbase while maintaining its primary college basketball attractions on ESPN, ESPN2, ESPN U, and ESPN Full Court subscription. ESPN in Latin America (Brazil's version included) does involve with the Olympics. But that's a completely different axis from the US and ESPN in America is so unproven in the Olympic TV realm. In terms of viewership, I think Quaker2001 refers to bringing everybody in the American mainstream as a tentpole attraction for a general TV network, not just die hard sports fans. Many of them who don't care when to watch them live; the habit of watching the Olympics live on US TV for the most part will eventually change but it hasn't proved itself to TV networks and advertisers and their TV structures despite the recent technological developments like tablets and smartphones. Another thing: the IOC would mandate that a free-to-air network or channel would cover them too. If ESPN were to be involved, ABC would have to be a part of that even with it since dissolved its sports division to favor ESPN's (note the ESPN on ABC tag for things like the NBA).

Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO, yes it would. They have too much on their plate in February (mostly college basketball) to shove that all aside for the Olympics. It doesn't fit into their corporate profile all that well when the primary audience for an Olympics doesn't mesh with their usual audience. And that they're a cable network, I think the IOC would have serious reservations about awarding them the contract. I know there's ABC, but they would be a very secondary piece of the puzzle.

I think the NBCSN numbers give a good indication of what viewership would be like if ESPN had the Games. NBCSN averaged 1.6 million viewers for its live daytime coverage. Since ESPN is distributed more widely, maybe they'd get 2.5 million viewers, but that would be spread out across 3 or 4 channels showing live coverage at the same time. Regardless, ESPN would be lucky to get 1/10th the viewership for live coverage that NBC gets in primetime. Since ESPN has commitments to college basketball and the NBA, they couldn't show coverage in primetime, and as you said, primetime coverage on ABC would not be a focus. That's just not how Disney has operated for the past decade. Thus, with ESPN, the Olympic coverage would be reaching a lot less people than NBC does, and that would be disastrous for the Olympic brand in the U.S.

I think it has as much to do, for all of NBC's faults, with its now-long standing broadcasting track record since Seoul 1988, winning so many awards like Emmys and the strong track records for both ratings, quality of, and (most importanty) eagerness or commitment to pay massive amounts of cash to the IOC from the most important Olympic market why the IOC likes NBC so much, especially now with Comcast firmly into it. CBS and Turner Sports could reunite for the Olympics If willing. But where's the committment went after 1998? Its most important joint sports broadcasting project right now is NCAA March Madness, would those be willing to jettison the NBA On TNT on Thursday nights for roughly three weeks? Doubt it now. If they did for the Winter Olympics, it would involve TBS, TNT, and TruTV on the cable side like for the NCAA basketball tournament. CBS doesn't seem interested.

I think there's two reasons why CBS hasn't been interested since 1998. First, Sean McManus became president of CBS Sports in November 1996. Despite the fact that his father (Jim McKay) largely defined his career by the Olympics, Sean McManus has never been a big fan of the Olympics. His focus has always been on the NFL and NCAA basketball. He didn't even attend the 1998 Winter Games in Nagano, and CBS's coverage of those Games was completely lackluster. Second, the IOC made an exclusive, secret deal with NBC in 1995 for the 2000 and 2002 Games, and then the 2004-2008 Games. CBS wasn't even given a chance to bid. I think the CBS executives felt burned by that--they were very upset that they weren't even allowed to submit a bid even though they had televised all 3 Winter Games in the 90s. Those two factors together (as well as a focus on keeping the NFL and NCAA basketball rights) explain why CBS hasn't submitted a bid in 2003 and 2011.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...