Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Team USA

Road to Rio 2016

Recommended Posts

Anybody know when the official/detailed schedule for Rio will be released?

I know a general one has been developed, and its a LONG ways off, but I was just wondering. Haven't been able to find anything in my searches over the past 6 months or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably not anytime soon. Still 2 and a half years out. Lots to come over the next little bit. 2015 will be when most of the actual starts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rio2016.org/en/news/news/work-starts-on-rio-2016-olympic-velodrome

Another Rio 2016 competition venue has begun to shape. This month work started at the Olympic Park in Barra da Tijuca on the Rio Olympic Velodrome, which will host track cycling events at the Olympic and Paralympic Games in two years' time. The first phase of work includes preparing the construction site and laying the foundations. The venue is scheduled to be completed in the second half of 2015.

The start of work means the velodrome follows into construction the Olympic Halls and the Olympic Tennis Centre, which are also in the Olympic Park, and the Olympic Golf Course, which is nearby, still within the Barra zone.

The velodrome will become a crucial part of the main sporting legacy of the Rio 2016 Games - Brazil's first Olympic Training Centre. Together with the three Olympic Halls, tennis centre and Maria Lenk Aquatic Park, the velodrome will form the most modern base for the training and accommodation of high-performance athletes in South America, as well as enabling Rio to host top-level sports events for many years to come.

With 5,000 permanent seats and 800 temporary seats, the velodrome has been designed with accessibility in mind, to be welcoming for people with a disability. The project will obtain LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, which promotes sustainability in construction.

This year, work will start on two more Rio 2016 competition venues: the Olympic Aquatics Stadium and Olympic Hall 4, the latter of which will host handball during the Olympic Games and goalball in the Paralympic Games, and then be dismantled and its parts used in the construction of four public schools.

There will also be important advances in infrastructure works this year, with the inauguration of the Transcarioca Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line, a 39km corridor that will link Barra with Rio International Airport, and the start of work on the Light Rail Transit (LRT) network that will connect Rio's main bus station with the domestic airport, revitalised port area and the historic city centre.


Some other new news

http://www.rio2016.org/en/news/news/the-carioca-carnival-will-make-way-for-sport-at-the-sambodromo-during-the-rio-2016-games

http://www.rio2016.org/en/news/news/argentina-will-vie-for-unprecedented-gold-in-hockey-at-the-rio-2016-games-albeit-without-s

http://www.rio2016.org/en/news/news/brazil-has-best-fans-in-the-world-says-new-zealand-rugby-captain-as-sevens-event-gives-tas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rio2016.com/en/news/news/race-to-qualify-for-rio-2016-olympic-and-paralympic-games-starts-in-2014 The starting pistol for the race to the Rio 2016 Games will be fired this year. In the coming months, some of the 15,000 Olympic and Paralympic athletes who will compete in Brazil will take a major step towards their dream. Throughout 2014, athletes from at least 10 Olympic sports – including basketball, equestrian and sailing – and 12 Paralympic sports – including goalball, 7-a-side football and sitting volleyball – will earn qualification spots for the greatest sporting event on the planet.

“This year we will see the first athletes book their places in Rio and that is a very exciting step not only for them, but also for us at the organising committee,” said Melina Xanthopoulou, Rio 2016’s Sport Entries Manager. “When the Games begin, the huge efforts of the athletes will be rewarded with the chance to compete on the world’s biggest stage.”

More than 10,000 athletes will compete at the first Olympic Games in South America, in August 2016, and the following month 4,350 Paralympic athletes will have their moment in Rio.

Using the world rankings method, major international and continental competitions held within an established period are graded according to their degree of importance. At the end of the period, the athletes or teams with the most points win the available places. Judo, tennis and beach volleyball are among the sports that use this criterion.

Several IFs, such as those governing basketball and volleyball, use international and continental competitions as a means of access to the Games, rewarding the champions and sometimes the best-placed runners-up in the same way that qualifying tournaments do. Individual sports usually require athletes to reach set qualification standards.

Highlights among Rio 2016 qualification events this year will be the men’s and women’s basketball world cups (in August-September and September-October, respectively), the sailing and shooting world championships (both in September) and the World Equestrian Games (August-September). At the Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea (September-October) the winners of the men’s and women’s hockey competitions will secure their spots, while rugby and golf, which are both returning to the Olympic programme in 2016, will also begin their qualifying processes for Rio this year.

For Paralympic sports, the pace will be even faster. June and July will see five world championships decide places at Rio 2016 and dreams will continue to be realised – and hearts broken- until the end of the year, when 70 para-cyclists will qualify through the world ranking system.

The race to Rio is well and truly on.Each sport’s International Federation (IF) determines the qualification system adopted, together with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and International Paralympic Committee (IPC). There are two types of qualification: ‘nominal’ – when athletes win spots for themselves (e.g. table tennis, wrestling); and ‘slot’ – when athletes win places for their National Olympic and Paralympic Committees (NOCs/NPCs) who then decide, with the National Federation, if they will use the quota and which athletes to send (e.g. rowing, football, volleyball).

Each sport ensures there is fair gender and continental representation through quotas. This can lead to exceptions in the nominal system – when an NOC/NPC has more athletes qualified than the quota allows for, the NOC/NPC makes the final decision (e.g. athletics, swimming, judo).

Qualification can be achieved according to world rankings, through the major international competitions, or via specific qualifying tournaments. Often, two or more of these methods are combined. All federations have finalised their systems for Rio 2016, although some are still pending IOC approval.


Highlights among Rio 2016 qualification events this year will be the men’s and women’s basketball world cups (in August-September and September-October, respectively), the sailing and shooting world championships (both in September) and the World Equestrian Games (August-September). At the Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea (September-October) the winners of the men’s and women’s hockey competitions will secure their spots, while rugby and golf, which are both returning to the Olympic programme in 2016, will also begin their qualifying processes for Rio this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RIO DE JANEIRO – More than 2,000 workers stayed away from venue construction sites for the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics on Tuesday as a strike that began last week continued without an end in sight.


A spokesperson for Rio Mais, the consortium building venues at the Olympic Park, confirmed the work stoppage. It began Thursday in a dispute over which union represents the construction workers, and also involves benefits and working conditions.


"There's no possibility to keep working with the conditions we have here," said Carlos Alberto Oliveira, a leader of the Light Industry Workers Union.


He spoke outside the gates of the Olympic Park -- located about 15 miles west of central Rio -- as workers milled around. He said the strike involved 3,500 people, although Rio Mais has put the number at 2,300.


"People have been working under precarious conditions," Oliveira added.


There was no hint of violence on Tuesday after random gunshots were fired Monday in a run-in between strikers and security guards. No injuries were reported.


The Rio Olympics have been plagued by a late start and delays, and the games top the agenda of a meeting this week in the southern Turkish resort of Belek.


On Tuesday, the head of Olympic summer sports federations called for "urgent action" to tackle delays.


Francisco Ricci Bitti called the situation "very serious" and said "we are scared."


Ricci Bitti heads the Association of Summer Olympic International Federations, which represents the 28 sports in the Rio Games. He also leads the International Tennis Federation and serves on the IOC coordination commission for Rio, which made its latest visit to Brazil three weeks ago.


"We can't always hope in the fact that in the end we will solve the problem," he said. "This time we have the style and the habits of the South Americans. They are not used to managing big events like this. The Olympics is a very different problem from the World Cup. The World Cup in the end is one stadium, one hotel, in many cities. Rio has a lot of problems."


Many of the delays are rooted in disputes among Brazil's three levels of government over who pays for what. Most estimates suggest Brazil will spend about $15 billion on the Olympics, a mix of public and private money.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.rio2016.org/en/news/news/work-starts-on-rio-2016-olympic-velodrome

Another Rio 2016 competition venue has begun to shape. This month work started at the Olympic Park in Barra da Tijuca on the Rio Olympic Velodrome, which will host track cycling events at the Olympic and Paralympic Games in two years' time. The first phase of work includes preparing the construction site and laying the foundations. The venue is scheduled to be completed in the second half of 2015.

The start of work means the velodrome follows into construction the Olympic Halls and the Olympic Tennis Centre, which are also in the Olympic Park, and the Olympic Golf Course, which is nearby, still within the Barra zone.

The velodrome will become a crucial part of the main sporting legacy of the Rio 2016 Games - Brazil's first Olympic Training Centre. Together with the three Olympic Halls, tennis centre and Maria Lenk Aquatic Park, the velodrome will form the most modern base for the training and accommodation of high-performance athletes in South America, as well as enabling Rio to host top-level sports events for many years to come.

With 5,000 permanent seats and 800 temporary seats, the velodrome has been designed with accessibility in mind, to be welcoming for people with a disability. The project will obtain LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification, which promotes sustainability in construction.

This year, work will start on two more Rio 2016 competition venues: the Olympic Aquatics Stadium and Olympic Hall 4, the latter of which will host handball during the Olympic Games and goalball in the Paralympic Games, and then be dismantled and its parts used in the

There will also be important advances in infrastructure works this year, with the inauguration of the Transcarioca Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) line, a 39km corridor that will link Barra with Rio International Airport, and the start of work on the Light Rail Transit (LRT) network that will connect Rio's main bus station with the domestic airport, revitalised port area and the historic city centre.

Some other new news

ya thanks for sharing out exact news.. Work is in good progress and I hope it get completed well in time..Plenty of energy all around..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Preparations for the Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games will reach an important stage in August this year when the organising committee stages its first test event. The sailing competition Guanabara Bay will herald the start of the test event programme, which up to May 2016 will involve 45 sports events at Rio 2016 Games venues. These will provide the organising committee with a practical opportunity to assess all stages of the operations involved in delivering the main events two years from now.


“Our priority during these events is to test the competition areas and results systems. These are fundamental parts of the venues which should perform flawlessly to allow athletes to produce their best. We will also have the opportunity to plan and assess the operation of venues and measure the impact of the events on the city,” said Agberto Guimarães, Rio 2016’s Executive Director of Sport and Paralympic Integration.


Test events are a crucial part of any organising committee’s work. For example, the 2012 London Games organisers staged 42 test events, involving 8,000 athletes and 30,000 staff. Delphine Moulin, Rio 2016’s Test Events General Manager, said these events also represent a unique opportunity to bring together everyone who will be responsible for running the Olympic and Paralympic competitions.


“The test events will provide the first opportunity to train those tasked with operating venues during the Games and to integrate the committee’s team with International Sports Federations and governments, who also have an important role to play in the delivery of the Games,” Moulin said.


Between 2 and 9 August this year, some 400 sailors from the 10 Olympic classes will compete in Guanabara Bay in the first Rio 2016 test event. However, the majority of the test events will take place during the second half of 2015. From July to October next year, test events for open-air sports disciplines such as the marathon, triathlon and beach volleyball will take place. The idea is to hold them at the same time of year as the Games themselves, to replicate likely climatic conditions. Between November 2015 and January 2016, when the Rio summer is at its most intense, indoor sports will be the focus of the programme. The final period of competitions will run from March to late May 2016. These will include some of the biggest test events and will be an opportunity to practise and evaluate operations with a nearly full-strength team.


Twenty-five of the 45 competitions will be operated by the Rio 2016 Organising Committee, with the remaining 20 under the responsibility of the respective sport's International Federation or Brazilian Federation, although Rio 2016 will test specific operations during these events. The detailed Test Event Calendar will be released later this year.


While test events are fundamental to the organisation of the Games, they are no less important to the athletes themselves. Brazilian Emanuel Rego, a beach volleyball gold medallist at Athens 2004, took part in the preparation of the test event for his discipline at the 2012 London Games. A year before the main event, he and his then partner Alison Cerutti – who would go on to win silver at the London Games – were invited to scrutinise the venue by the event organisers.


“It was fundamental to have prior knowledge of our logistics for the Games and to have a better understanding of the venue itself, the places we would have to go through and where we could rest between training sessions, for example,” said Rego, who has a full set of Olympic medals after participating in five consecutive summer Games.


“In a sport like beach volleyball, where natural conditions affect the game, this initial contact is even more important, as we need to establish things such as the direction of the sun and the density of the sand. In London, I recall that we discovered during the test event that the wind was blowing diagonally across the court. During the Games themselves, once the arena had been built, this wind was blocked off, resolving the issue.”


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a still more than two years before the start of the Rio 2016 Games but the race to qualify for the Olympicmountain bike competitions begins on 25 May. Henrique Avancini, who earlier this year won Brazil´s first mountain biking gold medal at the South American Games in Santiago, is fully focused on getting a flying start. The current world number 21 knows he is blessed to have the close support of Ruy Avancini, who is both technical director of the Brazilian national team and his father.

“We work as a team, each person doing his bit. I train and take care of my results on the course while my father plays his role as director. We will certainly work hard to be at the Rio de Janeiro Games”, says Henrique during a visit with his father to the Rio 2016 Organising Committee’s head office in Cidade Nova.

As host country, Brazil has two guaranteed places in mountain biking – one in the men’s event and one in the women’s. According to Ruy Avancini, however, the goal is for at least two men to qualify through merit. In order to do this, the national team must remain in the top 13 in the world rankings. Currently, Brazil lies in 10th position. Qualifying will be difficult but it is certainly well within reach.

“It’s a complicated mission. Cycling is an unpredictable, very unstable sport. A single fall on the last bend by a single athlete can lose a country many points. But today, we’re within the range for two athletes to qualify. In other words, we’re on track. It’s hard, but it’s possible”, explains Ruy.

Henrique is undeniably playing his part. The athlete, who is from Petrópolis in the state of Rio de Janeiro, achieved Brazil´s best ever result in mountain biking last year, when he came first in the Munsingen stage of the Bundesliga (the German championship). A place in the world´s top 20 followed, another first for a Brazilian. The 25 year old topped these achievements by becoming South American champion earlier this year. Thanks in large part to Henrique´s results, Brazil has risen to 10th place in the world rankings. All of which has given a significant boost to the confidence of the Brazilian delegation as they pursue their first Olympic mountain biking medal.

“A year ago, I would have said it would be impossible for Brazil to reach the podium in cycling in 2016. But seeing Henrique’s development close-up as I am doing, I don’t think it’s that hard for us to reach the podium. It is indeed possible for us to fight for a medal”, says Ruy.

From now until the start of the Rio 2016 Games, both father and son will continue to contribute to the development of mountain biking in Brazil, providing first-hand knowledge of how top competitions are organised.
“Their visit to the Committee was great for Olympic cycling’s preparations. We tried to make the most of their time. It’s not every day that we have at our disposal the opinion and vision of the director of the Brazilian confederation and a leading cycling athlete”, says Ricardo Prado, president of the Rio 2016 Committee Sports Council.
Regardless of his results on the course, Henrique is inspired by the coming two years and says the Rio 2016 Games will be unforgettable – for athletes, spectators and the host city itself. “Rio, the Marvellous City, is unique. There’s no other place in the world like it” he confirms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×