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So The IOC Prez wants to do something. All talk just as the IOC is, adding another sport for 2020 and at the same time controling costs. In my opinion we at Gamesbid should run the IOC. All of us have their own thing so we might make the Olympics better or even save them. Here's an idea let Football pro in the Olympics. O yes I forgot FIFA they like to have control.

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I guess I'm not the only one who finds it ironic that all these recommendations are being debated by the IOC in Monaco, the very epitome of tax evasion, flaunting of extreme wealth, & general over

You hit on both points in that 2nd paragraph. It is most definitely feasible to allow other cities into the mix. But 'optimal' is in the eye of the beholder and the IOC voter who chooses the host ci

You can think what you want of royals (I'm a republican myself), but members like Prince Albert and Princess Anne WERE actual Olympic athletes, and have taken their IOC duties seriously. Indeed they'v

So The IOC Prez wants to do something. All talk just as the IOC is, adding another sport for 2020 and at the same time controling costs. In my opinion we at Gamesbid should run the IOC. All of us have their own thing so we might make the Olympics better or even save them. Here's an idea let Football pro in the Olympics. O yes I forgot FIFA they like to have control.

I think it is because the Olympics is for Ameaturs so they limited 3 Professionals.

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Uhm...the "Olympics are for amateurs" days are over since 1988.

Ok in other words for athletes who have made their name through the Olympics. Messi or Ronaldo didn't.

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In other words Athletes who have made there name through The Olympic Games. Footballers like Messi or Ronaldo haven't.

So to be able to compete in the Olympics, you must have excelled at the Olympics before. Now that's a very vicious circle. Good luck with that one.

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So to be able to compete in the Olympics, you must have excelled at the Olympics before. Now that's a very vicious circle. Good luck with that one.

No I didn't say they were completely not able to participate, I said that is why the IOC has a limit of 3 Professional Footballers in Each of the Mens Football Squad at the Olympic Games.

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The IOC has the rule of 3 over 23 year olds (it's age, nothing to do with amateur/pro status) because FIFA doesn't want the Olympics to overshadow WC and that was the compromise, simple as that. If IOC had their way, they'd happily let all those Messis, Ronaldos and Riberys in.

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The IOC has the rule of 3 over 23 year olds (it's age, nothing to do with amateur/pro status) because FIFA doesn't want the Olympics to overshadow WC and that was the compromise, simple as that. If IOC had their way, they'd happily let all those Messis, Ronaldos and Riberys in.

Oh I honestly thought it was because of Professionals. Ok fair enough.

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  • 4 months later...
IOC President Thomas Bach announces composition of Olympic Agenda 2020 Working Groups

22/05/2014

In another key milestone in the process of building Olympic Agenda 2020, a strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic Movement, IOC President Thomas Bach today released the membership of the 14 Working Groups which will help frame some of the key recommendations. Each group will be made up of key stakeholders of the Olympic Movement, including IOC members, athletes and representatives of the International Federations and National Olympic Committees. As part of the ongoing open and inclusive process, a number of experts have also been included from civil society, including representatives of leading international organisations, NGOs and business organisations. The Working Groups will look at proposals made by the Olympic Movement, the world of sport and even by individual members of the public. Under discussion will be topics ranging from Ethics and the Youth Olympic Games to Good Governance and Autonomy and the planned Olympic TV Channel.

The Working Groups have been established to compile and discuss detailed contributions to the Olympic Agenda 2020, which was initiated last year by President Bach. Each of the Groups will meet in June around the occasion of Olympic Day, and their findings will be presented to the IOC Executive Board (EB) in July. The findings will then be discussed at the Olympic Summit later in the month, which will be attended by all the key stakeholders of the Olympic Movement.

The contributions will then be presented to the IOC commissions in September, before being discussed again at an EB meeting in October. The refined proposals for Olympic Agenda 2020 will then be presented for discussion by the whole membership and approval of the IOC Extraordinary Session in Monaco on 8 and 9 December 2014.

Discussions have centred on five themes: the uniqueness of the Olympic Games, athletes at the heart of the Olympic Movement, Olympism in action, the IOC’s role and IOC structure and organisation.

There has been strong interest across the Olympic Movement in the Olympic Agenda 2020. Discussions at the 126th IOC Session in Sochi, for example, included a total of 211 interventions made by the IOC members.

President Bach called for direct contributions on the debate of the future of the Olympic Movement to be made via email at OlympicAgenda2020@olympic.org. Contributions – from all continents – flooded in from National Olympic Committees, International Federations, sports organisations, NGOs and the general public by the final deadline of 15 April.

Complete list of the Working Groups.

IOC

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Im going to be very interesting to see about the outcome of the Olympic Television channel. I am interested that the IOC president is in charge of this group. I really hope that the Olympic Channel gets off the ground.

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  • 4 weeks later...
Working Groups gather in Lausanne to work on contributions to Olympic Agenda 2020

The 14 Working Groups that will help frame some of the key recommendations for the Olympic Agenda 2020, a strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic Movement, will meet this week at the International Olympic Committee (IOC) headquarters in Lausanne.

On the agenda, a chance to discuss in detail the proposals made by the Olympic Movement, the world of sport and individual members of the public.

The Working Groups, the memberships of which were announced by IOC President Thomas Bach on 14 May, will meet between 16 and 24 June. Each group is made up of key stakeholders of the Olympic Movement, including IOC members, athletes and representatives of the International Federations and National Olympic Committees.

As part of the ongoing open and inclusive process, a number of experts from civil society have also been included, including representatives of leading international organisations, NGOs and business organisations.

Some of the organisations represented are Google, Transparency International and the World Bank.

The Working Groups will look at the contributions received by members of the Olympic family and the submissions received via a special email address set up to collect feedback. Almost half of the submissions received came from Olympic Movement stakeholders, while about a quarter came from members of the public. There were thousands of submissions on different Olympic themes. The themes that generated the most contributions were: Bidding Procedure; Procedure for Composition of the Olympic Programme; Differentiation of the Olympic Games; Good Governance and Autonomy; Olympism in Action Including Youth Strategy; and IOC Membership.

The 14 Working Groups are:

1. Bidding Procedure

2. Sustainability and Legacy

3. Differentiation of the Olympic Games

4. Procedure for the Composition of the Olympic Programme

5. Olympic Games Management

6. Protecting Clean Athletes

7. Olympic TV Channel

8. Olympism in Action Including Youth Strategy

9. Youth Olympic Games

10. Culture Policy

11. Good Governance and Autonomy

12. Ethics

13. Strategic Review of Sponsorship, Licensing and Merchandising

14. IOC Membership

The Working Groups will present a broad outline of their findings to the IOC Executive Board (EB) at its next meeting in July. This outline will then be discussed at the Olympic Summit later the same month, which will be attended by all the key stakeholders of the Olympic Movement.

The contributions will then be presented to the IOC commissions in September, before being discussed again at an EB meeting in October. The refined proposals for Olympic Agenda 2020 will lastly be presented for discussion by the entire IOC membership and final approval at an IOC Extraordinary Session in Monaco on 8 and 9 December 2014.

IOC

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  • 4 months later...

IOC Keeps Ban on Member Visits to Bid Cities

10/23/14

(ATR ) Around the Rings has learned that the IOC’s ruling body will not recommend lifting the 15-year-old ban on member visits to Olympic bid cities.

ATR is told that the IOC executive board, which concluded its meeting in the Swiss resort of Montreux today, did not draft a proposal for approval at the IOC Session in Monaco to reintroduce member visits.

...

http://aroundtherings.com/site/A__48821/Title__IOC-Keeps-Ban-on-Member-Visits-to-Bid-Cities/292/Articles

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It's probably for the best. They don't want to risk another Nagano or SLC bidding process. Given how other bids for other events have turned out because of visits coughfifacough, they're making the best decision to keep the bidding process fairer for everyone.

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It's probably for the best. They don't want to risk another Nagano or SLC bidding process. Given how other bids for other events have turned out because of visits coughfifacough, they're making the best decision to keep the bidding process fairer for everyone.

Indeed. After those visits, IOC members probably had made up their mind, but not on grounds of which city had the best concept to vote for, but the best bribes. Nobody needs to have that back.

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Olympics-IOC to unveil major Olympic changes next week

Nov 14 (Reuters) - The International Olympic Committee will unveil plans to overhaul parts of the sporting extravaganza next week as they look to make the Games more attractive to fans and sponsors alike.

IOC President Thomas Bach will present 40 recommendations at the renovated Olympic Museum in Lausanne on Nov. 18 and while specific details of his proposals have yet to be revealed, they will affect the way cities campaign to land the Olympics and how sports will be included in the future.

The IOC session in Monaco next month will vote on each of the recommendations, part of Bach's Agenda 2020, which could usher in the most significant changes to the Olympics in decades.

The biggest change concerns bidding for the Olympics, with the IOC wanting to make it cheaper and more adaptable to the needs of cities rather than current extensive IOC pre-requisites.

Four of six cities bidding for the 2022 Winter Olympics pulled out midway through the process citing financial concerns or lack of public support, leaving Beijing and Kazakhstan's Almaty as the only candidates.

The withdrawals have dented the Games' reputation, seen by some cities more as an oversized economic burden and strain on a country's resources than a financially lucrative prospect.

"With regard to the bidding procedure, the purpose of the recommendations is to turn the procedure into an invitation for discussion and partnership with the IOC rather than just an application for a tender," Bach told reporters days ago.

The proposed changes will also make it easier for new sports to become part of the Games, which in turn can attract fresh fans, sponsors and higher broadcast revenues.

Sports currently need to wait seven years from their approval until their first appearance.

The first Games to benefit could be the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics with the Japanese pushing for the inclusion of baseball and softball, after they were taken off the programme following the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

There is also a recommendation for the creation of an Olympic broadcast channel as the IOC looks to provide the Games experience year-round rather than just every four years.

Other changes could see the age limit for IOC members, who must step down at 70, raised, but there will be no lifting of IOC members' travel ban to bid cities, a rule introduced after the 2002 Salt Lake City bribery scandal.

Reuters

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/olympics-ioc-unveil-major-olympic-changes-next-week-092335056--sector.html#BounLSa

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I love the way the propaganda is that Agenda 2020 will make things cheaper and easier, but that the only practical implication seems to be that cities will be allowed to add more events, more venues, more cost, etc.

Newspeak at its finest.

Well, we'll see. Now is a really really good time for a worldwide sporting organisation to look as if it's putting its house in order ....

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Well, we'll see. Now is a really really good time for a worldwide sporting organisation to look as if it's putting its house in order ....

I have no doubt the IOC will look as if - but if they really do put things in order...that's a whole different matter.

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Olympic Agenda 2020: Strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic Movement unveiled

18/11/2014

IOC President says “Now is the time for change”

International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach today revealed the 40 proposals that make up Olympic Agenda 2020, a strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic Movement, which will be discussed and voted on by the full IOC membership at the 127th IOC Session this 8 and 9 December in Monaco.

During the public launch of the recommendations at The Olympic Museum in Lausanne, President Bach called the 20+20 proposals “the culmination of a year of open, transparent and widespread debate and discussion, which had already begun in mid-2013.”

“These 40 recommendations are like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle,” he added. “When you put them together, a picture emerges that shows the IOC safeguarding the uniqueness of the Olympic Games and strengthening sport in society.”

The IOC President first presented the recommendations to a round table of athletes, many of whom actively contributed to the Olympic Agenda 2020 process. The discussion included a number of medal-winning Olympians.*

Some of the key areas addressed by the recommendations are:

- Changes to the bidding process (Recommendation 1), with a new philosophy to invite potential candidate cities to present a project that fits their sporting, economic, social and environmental long-term planning needs. Shaping it more as an invitation and introducing an “invitation phase” – during which cities considering a bid will be advised about the opportunities this new procedure offers, in particular in regard to legacy and sustainability. The organisation of sports and events outside the host city and even, in exceptional cases, outside the host country could also be allowed, always respecting the integrity of the Olympic Village.

- Reducing costs for bidding (Recommendation 3), by decreasing the number of presentations that are allowed and providing a significant financial contribution from the IOC. At the same time emphasising that the sustainability of a bid must be taken into consideration right from the beginning.

- Move from a sport-based to an event-based programme (Recommendation10). Create limits on accreditation for athletes, coaches and other athlete support staff to ensure that the Games do not grow bigger. Allowing more than 28 sports to be on the programme while respecting these limits.

- Strengthen the 6th Fundamental Principle of Olympism (Recommendation 14). The IOC to include non-discrimination on sexual orientation in the 6th Fundamental Principle of Olympism in the Olympic Charter.

- Launch of an Olympic TV Channel (Recommendation 19) to provide a platform for sports and athletes beyond the Olympic Games period, 365 days a year. To fully connect with the digital age and connect with young people on their terms. It will be a worldwide platform and an opportunity to spread Olympic values as well as highlighting the IOC’s many cultural and humanitarian projects. Candidate cities may also be given exposure during the bidding phase.

- Adapting and further strengthening the principles of good governance and ethics to changing demands. Ensuring compliance with the Basic Universal Principles of Good Governance (Recommendation 27) and transparency of accounts (Recommendation 29), with the IOC’s financial statements to be prepared and audited according to the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) even when not legally required. Strengthening the independence of the IOC Ethics Commission (Recommendation 30), with the chair and members of the Commission to be elected by the IOC Session. The IOC will also create the position of compliance officer (Recommendation 31) to advise IOC members, staff, NOCs and IFs with regard to compliance.

The athletes remain at the centre of all 40 of the proposals, with the protection of the clean athletes being at the heart of the IOC’s philosophy. The central importance of the “athletes’ experience” will be introduced into the evaluation criteria with no compromise on the field of play for athletes, and the paramount importance of the Olympic Village.

Read Olympic Agenda 2020: 20+20 Recommendations here.

Read Olympic Agenda 2020: Context and Background here.

O2020_600.jpg

“Over the past year many people have asked me why there is a desire to make changes. After all, they say, the Olympic Games, the IOC, and the Olympic Movement have enjoyed many successes and we are in a very good position,” said President Bach. “My answer is that we are now in the position to drive change ourselves rather than being driven. We have to take leadership with Olympic Agenda 2020. We have the opportunity, and we must seize the moment – now is the time for change.”

There is no change proposed to the age limit of 70 for IOC members. In a limited number of cases (five), a one-time extension of a member’s term of office may be made for a maximum of four years (Recommendation 37). There is no proposal to allow individual members to visit candidate cities, but there is a proposal that will lead to more in-depth information and discussion about the strengths, weaknesses, risks and opportunities of candidate cities (Recommendation 2).

The 40 recommendations were finalised by the IOC Executive Board in October following presentations from the chairs of the 14 Working Groups that were set up to refine the proposals earlier this year. In addition to members of the Olympic Movement, including National Olympic Committees, International Federations, TOP sponsors and athletes, the Working Groups consisted of experts from civil society such as the United Nations, Google/YouTube, Transparency International, the Clinton Foundation, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and the World Bank.

Strong interest from across the Olympic Movement has been shown in Olympic Agenda 2020. Discussions at the 126th IOC Session in Sochi, for example, included a total of 211 interventions by the IOC members. The proposals were also debated by the IOC Commissions and at two Olympic Summits. The Summits brought together the presidents of the major stakeholders of the Olympic Movement.

...

IOC

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