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Beijing/Zhangjiakou 2022

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there been reports on German TV that Beijing suffers big time with Air Pollution, even more in Winter month

since they turn on the coal-fired Power stations

The coal is used as reasonable fuel for heater at home. China should shift to another energy gradually for people's health and their future.

Maybe i will never see Winter Olympics in my home city, no matter 2022, 2026,2030,2034, 2038............. :( :(

Harbin would be a desperate housewife forever...a COLD desperate housewife...

Keep on believing in your hometown. ;)

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Having 1.4 billion people force fed your product for seven years is a good little situation to have if you're the IOC.

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China is "a very strong candidate" to host the 2022 Winter Olympics, International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach said on Tuesday afternoon.

"China is known worldwide as a reliable organizer. We all still remember the brilliant Olympic Games in 2008 in Beijing. So I think China will have a good chance, but it's not an easy race."

When he met Bach later in the day, Xi stressed China's willingness to host the Winter Olympics.

Early this month, Beijing and neighboring Zhangjiakou in Hebei province announced a joint bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics. They are competing with Stockholm (Sweden), Oslo (Norway), Lviv (Ukraine), Almaty (Kazakhstan) and a joint bid from Krakow (Poland) and Jasna (Slovakia).

Bach, a German who took over as IOC chief in September, has visited Nanjing, host city for the 2014 Youth Olympic Games, and Beijing in the past two days on his first visit to China in his current capacity.

Xi told Bach during their meeting that China hopes to use the bidding opportunity to help promote the development of the Olympic movement and winter sports.

China will try to improve the health of its people and develop sports among the public as well as elite athletes, Xi said.

After the meeting, Bach presented Xi with the Olympic Order in Gold, the Olympic movement's highest award.

For the 2022 Winter Games, Beijing is bidding to host events staged on ice, while Zhangjiakou, about 200 km northwest of the capital, is bidding to host the snow events.

An intercity railway has been planned and when it is operational it will take only about 40 minutes to travel between the two cities. Construction is expected to start at the end of this year.

China's bid for the Winter Olympics offers a new approach to the Winter Games, Bach said.

"With this bid, the people of Beijing, a metropolitan area, would have great access to winter sports. They would be motivated to practice winter sports all over the region and all over China," he said.

"This is a huge opportunity for the people in Beijing and for the whole area."

Compared with the achievements of Chinese athletes at the Summer Olympics, the country is not so good at winter sports.

Yang Yang became China's first Winter Olympic champion, winning the gold medal in the women's 500m short track speed skating at the 2002 Salt Lake City Winter Olympics in the United States.

Since then, China has progressed in winter sports, particularly in speed skating, figure skating, freestyle aerial skiing and women's curling.

Bach believes that China will be among the leading winter sports countries in the future.

Yang echoed Bach's view, saying: "Whether we win or lose, it's a good opportunity for China to develop its winter sports.

"I think the bid is a very good first step. We can improve ourselves in the process and the world will know more about us."

China bid to stage the 2010 Winter Olympics in Harbin, the capital of Heilongjiang province, but failed to make the shortlist, with the Games going to the Canadian city of Vancouver.

This time, the bid has raised public concern over the heavy smog that has blanketed Beijing and nearby areas frequently this year.

But Bach remains upbeat about China's role on the global sports stage.

"First of all, you have very successful lead athletes if you look at the results Chinese athletes have achieved this year," he said.

"Second, China is a great organizer of international sports events, and we are also seeing many international events happening in China. We are very happy to have a bid from China for the Winter Games."

http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/90779/8460508.html

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"After the meeting, Bach presented Xi with the Olympic Order in Gold, the Olympic movement's highest award."

For what reasons exactly? In what way has Xi contributed to the Olympic movement? Another sorry example of IOC bending before authoritarian regimes.

Considering that, maybe this ridiculously timed Beijing bid may not be as chanceless as you'd think...

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Considering that, maybe this ridiculously timed Beijing bid may not be as chanceless as you'd think...

B) Maybe they won't win this race, but it would be interesting how they can play that.

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Very interesting. Which 2008 venues will they use do we think?

I'd imagine birds nest for ceremonies

Olympic green arena for short track / figure skating

Convention centre for ibc/mpc and long track speed skating.

Temporary venue on the olympic green for aerials maybe?

I guess some of the other indoor arenas for the ice hockey and curling?

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Beijing should make the shortlist based on extensive use of 2008 venues and that venues such as the ski jumps and sliding centre would probably be permanent in anticipation for a future bid and as a legacy for Chinese winter sports regardless.

As for winning, they'll never get the 2022 games, especially given PyeongChang hosting the 2018 Olympics and Tokyo hosting the 2020 games.

The thought of a handover ceremony in South Korea alone would make this an awkward games. But if they unlikely do get the nod, I do suppose it would greatly pressure North Korea to participate, as a gesture of goodwill.

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I just feel this bid is a waste of time. Yeah, it will probably get the marks to make it through to the Candidate Phase and China has the resources and experience, but with those 'other' Beijing Games being just five years ago and Nanjing hosting the next YOGs next summer and of course the 2018 Winter and 2020 Summer Games in Asia, is it geopolitically correct to rush back to Beijing after so short a period?

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They're an insurance policy & nothing else. And I'm sure the IOC will be more than happy to have them in the campaign just in case any of the other top three choices all falter, since the last two untested waters are non-starters anyway.

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Becuz of PyongChang 2018, Beijing has a snowball's chance in hell. No way 3 successive Olympic Games in Asia.

This is another reason why I see Almaty in sh!ts creek without a paddle, too. Some could still argue by splitting hairs & say but it's "central" Asia, but it's still Asia nonetheless. And with Beijing in the picture now, too, this only complicates things more, geopolitically, for the Kazahks.

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This is another reason why I see Almaty in sh!ts creek without a paddle, too. Some could still argue by splitting hairs & say but it's "central" Asia, but it's still Asia nonetheless. And with Beijing in the picture now, too, this only complicates things more, geopolitically, for the Kazahks.

Which really narrows the race to just between Oslo and Krakow...the only 2 viable bids in the whole lot.

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And I thought Oslo is "been there, done that" ;-)

it is. I didn't say that changed. The IOC always like to have a 2nd runner-up, especially in a race w/ 6 entrants at the start. And remember, Krakow also seems to have the highest 'public support' numbers.

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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And remember, Krakow also seems to have the highest 'public support' numbers.

Yeah, but also remember that "highest public support numbers" isn't always the answer either. London 2012 quickly comes to mind. They had the second lowest (behind New York) citizen support figures, but when on to win in the end. And on the opposite side of the spectrum, you always had high numbers with Madrid, yet they lost every single time they tried.

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Yeah, but also remember that "highest public support numbers" isn't always the answer either. London 2012 quickly comes to mind. They had the second lowest (behind New York) citizen support figures, but when on to win in the end. And on the opposite side of the spectrum, you always had high numbers with Madrid, yet they lost every single time they tried.

But it's a good, strong start. Rather that way than never to get your numbers up.

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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I just feel this bid is a waste of time. Yeah, it will probably get the marks to make it through to the Candidate Phase and China has the resources and experience, but with those 'other' Beijing Games being just five years ago and Nanjing hosting the next YOGs next summer and of course the 2018 Winter and 2020 Summer Games in Asia, is it geopolitically correct to rush back to Beijing after so short a period?

The 21st century is the Asia Pacific century remember that there will be lots of Olympics Games in both Winter and Summer Games in Asia this century the age of European domination of hosting the Olympics Games is over, The Norway and Sweden bids do not have government support nor likely too which will leave Poland, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and China, The IOC does not allow joint countries bid the only time that the IOC allowed it was with the Austrian bids for the 2010 and 2014 games with the already built Venus for sliding events in Germany which was only 20 km away from Salzburg, The joint bid that is Poland is making is over 200 km away, Ukraine is not ready for the Winter Olympics Games and they have a small economy.

It is a race between Almaty Kazakhstan and Beijing China to host the 2022 Winter Olympics Games both are growing winter sports powers in the world have fast growing economies, If China went with Harbin with the Winter Olympics Games then it will be a different story but it is way too soon to go back to Beijing again and Almaty Kazakhstan is a new winter sporting hub and the IOC was very impressed with them hosting the 2011 Asian Winter Games. The Kazakhstan President is also Pro Western and he can link the Western and the Islamic world together and Kazakhstan is also hosting the 2017 World Expo in Astana and the 2017 Winter University Games in Almaty,

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Somewhere on the way between Almaty and Gold Coast, a record must have broken.

Besides, Salzburg may have had bi-national, but never bi-planetarian bids. So please leave Venus out of this.

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The IOC does not allow joint countries bid (...)

Well, you contradicted yourself in the very same sentence:

(...) the only time that the IOC allowed it was with the Austrian bids for the 2010 and 2014 games with the already built Venus for sliding events in Germany which was only 20 km away from Salzburg,

There is also something in that Salzburg 2014 bid that really bothers me. The Olympic Charter states:

"For the Olympic Winter Games, when for geographical or topographical reasons it is impossible to organise certain events or disciplines of a sport in the country of the host city, the IOC may, on an exceptional basis, authorise the holding of these in a bordering country"

What were those "geographical or topographical" reasons that made Salzburg to use sliding venues in Germany? They haven't got suitable hills near Salzburg to built a bobsleigh track? We're those hills in a national park so they couldn't touch it?

It seems to me that using track located in Konigssee was based on purely financial reasons. That leads me to a question: shouldn't have Salzburg 2014 bid been disallowed by the IOC?

The joint bid that is Poland is making is over 200 km away,

Actually, it's about 180 km.

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Hm, Austria of course had a track in Innsbruck-Igls. Maybe they came up with Königssee however because

a) they didn't want to build a new one near Salzburg for financial, ecological and legacy reasons - there definitely are suitable, unprotected hills nearby,

B) Königssee being so near made the bid more compact

c) using Igls track, you could have asked why Innsbruck didn't bid itself in the first place and Salzburg maybe didn't want to involve an inner-Austrian "rival"

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