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Sir Rols

The Reactions

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Some interesting comments here. I like Pound as usual.

Reaction to Tokyo’s win in bid to host 2020 Games

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Reaction to the IOC’s decision to pick Tokyo as the host city of the 2020 Olympics.

“When I heard the word ‘Tokyo’ announced I got really emotional and I was so touched, overwhelmed. The joy was greater than when I was elected in my own election. Definitely this was more emotional than even winning myself. I am certain the IOC has given a great opportunity to Japan and we will begin working on it immediately.” — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

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“I think Tokyo prevailed definitely on the excellent quality of its bid, but the experience of the previous bid also played a valuable role. You have described yourselves as being a safe pair of hands. As a surgeon, this is something that appeals to me even though I didn’t vote myself.” — IOC President Jacques Rogge.

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“I’m sorry that we will not be able to share the enthusiasm that we had. Like in sports, this can only give us more motivation to get back on our feet and continue on our path. A project of this size has mobilized and united Spaniards. It’s an inheritance that we have to keep strong.” — Spain’s Crown Prince Felipe.

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“It was once more a decision between two principles. There you have one candidature addressing more the sense of tradition and stability and another candidature addresses the longing for new shores. This we have seen in the past also with different bids and this time the IOC members, in a fragile world, have decided in favor of tradition and stability.” — IOC vice president Thomas Bach.

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“First of all, I must commend all three of the bidding cities for their exceptional campaigns and presentations. The race to host the 2020 Games was closely contested from start to finish with all three cities demonstrating excellence and sophistication when it comes to delivering world class bids. My heart goes out to Istanbul and Madrid and their many supporters who worked tirelessly throughout the bid process.” — IOC vice president Ng Ser Miang.

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“Since they became candidates, they all acquired reasonably serious problems. When you looked back at their presentations, especially Tokyo, I thought the princess was magnificent, just magnificent, and quite different from anybody else Japan had put in the field, so that was factor one. And factor two was the answer the prime minister gave on Fukushima.” — Canadian IOC member Dick Pound.

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“I think they learned their lesson from the first time they bid and I think they performed very well today. I think Prime Minister (Shinzo) Abe gave all the right answers to the questions, like on Fukushima, so I think it was very good for Tokyo. I think Fukushima was an issue, but I think Prime Minister (Shinzo) Abe had a very good answer and we were satisfied with the answer.” — IOC member Prince Tunku Imran of Malaysia.

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“I thought that the presentation that surprised me today was Tokyo. I thought they’ve really raised their game. They’ve become humorous and very much more full of emotion. I felt also that the whole of the presentation was about sports, and that the things that surround sports and I thought that was done very well indeed. There was emotion.” — Philip Craven, president of the International Paralympic Committee.

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“I thought it was fabulous across the board. All three cities could have run the Olympic Games. This is the most wonderful choice the IOC has, to have cities of that caliber bidding. I think that is great.”— IOC vice president Craig Reedie.

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“There are a lot of commercial advantages for the IOC going to a country with the third-biggest GDP. And then compare that to the economic uncertainty facing Spain and the political unrest that Istanbul experienced a few months ago. And more particularly the unrest in the Middle East at the moment. We’ve taken the safe bet.” — Australian IOC member John Coates.

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“I always look at what will be provided for the athletes first, and I was confident that in each case the athletes would all be taken care. Tokyo and the people of Japan have a lot on the line. They’ve been through a lot together with the tsunami and the nuclear reactor. It’s a frightening thing. So they came together as a people.” — U.S. IOC member Anita DeFrantz.

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“My colleagues and I look forward to working closely together with our friends in Tokyo to share our experience of preparing for and hosting the Games in 2016, just as London has done for us. We know from our experience how much effort and dedication goes in to bidding for the games and we applaud Madrid and Istanbul on their excellent campaigns.”— Brazilian IOC member Carlos Nuzman.

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“Tokyo is one of the world’s most fascinating cities, and will provide a spectacular setting for the 2020 Olympic Games. Tokyo is particularly special to NBC as our rich Olympic heritage began there with the 1964 Olympic Games. We are excited to return in 2020, 56 years later, to broadcast what will be our 17th Olympic Games overall and 11th consecutive, and to bring the stories and performances of the world’s greatest athletes home to American viewers.” — Mark Lazarus, chairman of NBC Sports Group.

Washington Post

Edited by Sir Rols
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I'll get over my disappointment, but in the end Tokyo was the safe hands...

Something about the Japanese that gives me the shivers...

Its gonna feel so Automated and sterile?

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I'll get over my disappointment, but in the end Tokyo was the safe hands...

Something about the Japanese that gives me the shivers...

Its gonna feel so Automated and sterile?

They need to be given a chance.

That sterility you speak of is a cultural thing - it is what has given them a national tradition of not just doing things, but doing things well. As much as it pains me to admit - as an Istanbul supporter - they IOC made the right decision this morning. I'm happy with the outcome.

It's also fantastic news for Australians and Kiwis - we get front row seats in 2020!

Very interested in heading to Tokyo in 2020.

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It's interesting reading back on the live chat, that reactions here to Abe's answer to the Fukushima question were that he fluffed it. Yet, by the IOC reaction here, and the stories elsewhere including Insidethegames, it's hailed as a master point. I must watch the presso to see myself.

Edited by Sir Rols

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Agreed, I think a lot of people are going to be so surprised at Tokyo and the Japanese. Japan is a society of order, this is true, but it's hardly sterile. It certainly has elements of that, but it can also be a crazy gritty place. Most of all though, the warmth of the people is going to make the Games so special. A lot of people though the emotion of the presentation was *fake*, I think that's completely unfair to the Japanese, you could tell they really really did want this bad.

I'm buzzed though. Last was in Tokyo in 2011 and am looking at heading again next year, so a third trip in 2020 would work in well.


It's interesting reading back on the live chat, that reactions here to Abe's answer to the Fukushima question were that he fluffed it. Yet, by the IOC reaction here, and the stories elsewhere including Insidethegames, it's hailed as a master point. I must watch the presso to see myself.

It's the nature of these boards though.

The same people panning his answer were getting their shits and giggles out of the Japanese inability to pronounce their L's, go figure.

I think also for many people, they were never going to be satisfied by the answer.

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True. Gonna see the games move into the Robot era...That stadium is just too unbelievable and we get to use it a year before in RWC19.

Visited Japan in the late 90s, felt awkward moving around...Visited China three years ago and felt so welcomed.

Gotta give Japan credit...they do make life easy...

Still, Istanbul and Turkey for that matter did themselves no good in the last few months.

The fact that Istanbul went head to head with Tokyo shows the IOC really did try to find a way through for Turkey. Close but no cigar, and sadly not for a very long time. Next bids will be a log jam of mega cities if predictions on GB are anything to go by.

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I travelled to Japan in 2010 and what I found was a country that had incredible order and organization, a country that could be delicate, serious, serene and introspective, a country that had history and modernity...and then turn around the next corner and you found a country that was chaotic, kooky, giddy, cute, goofy, silly, crazy and mind boggling.

2020 won't be 1964.

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Agreed, I think a lot of people are going to be so surprised at Tokyo and the Japanese. Japan is a society of order, this is true, but it's hardly sterile. It certainly has elements of that, but it can also be a crazy gritty place. Most of all though, the warmth of the people is going to make the Games so special. A lot of people though the emotion of the presentation was *fake*, I think that's completely unfair to the Japanese, you could tell they really really did want this bad.

I'm buzzed though. Last was in Tokyo in 2011 and am looking at heading again next year, so a third trip in 2020 would work in well.

Yeah, I know it's go a lot to do with personal tastes and preferences and experiences, but I think we've got the same vibe about Japan. I just don't get this concept of sterility or boringness. In my experience it's always vibrant, exciting and the people are warm. Polite andshy, well often, yes, but I do feel the warmth when you try to engage with them. And I think they'll just go off and really get into the games.

Looking forward to heading back whenever. Actually, after just the other day "educating" and converting Hubby to Tokyo's cause, he does agree, and enthusiastically, that we'll definitely be aiming to head over for that one!

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1964 was Japan emerging from post war.

2020 will be Japan showing the way to the distant 22 century.

Feel sorry for the 2024 host that has to follow them!

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I'll get over my disappointment, but in the end Tokyo was the safe hands...

Something about the Japanese that gives me the shivers...

Its gonna feel so Automated and sterile?

Have you been to Disneyland Tokyo? That's the only thing that kept me from crying when they won.

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It's interesting reading back on the live chat, that reactions here to Abe's answer to the Fukushima question were that he fluffed it. Yet, by the IOC reaction here, and the stories elsewhere including Insidethegames, it's hailed as a master point. I must watch the presso to see myself.

he didn't answer the question at all, but at this time there is no complete answer. I guess they felt he was honest in giving his work he would take responsibility to do what is needed.

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Have you been to Disneyland Tokyo? That's the only thing that kept me from crying when they won.

We did, it was aweful.

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Madrid's reaction broke my heart... I have to say they were kind of a sentimental favorite to me... People were yellimg "2024! 2024!" but we know that wont happen :(

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Agreed, I think a lot of people are going to be so surprised at Tokyo and the Japanese. Japan is a society of order, this is true, but it's hardly sterile. It certainly has elements of that, but it can also be a crazy gritty place. Most of all though, the warmth of the people is going to make the Games so special. A lot of people though the emotion of the presentation was *fake*, I think that's completely unfair to the Japanese, you could tell they really really did want this bad.

I'm buzzed though. Last was in Tokyo in 2011 and am looking at heading again next year, so a third trip in 2020 would work in well.

It's the nature of these boards though.

The same people panning his answer were getting their shits and giggles out of the Japanese inability to pronounce their L's, go figure.

I think also for many people, they were never going to be satisfied by the answer.

A friend of mine without a great deal of interest in the Olympics made an interesting comment to me this morning:

"I hope Miyazaki does the Opening Ceremony."

Interesting idea - I think someone like him could really managed to crush the sterile claims with his ability to tap into the Japanese sensibility. Despite being an animator, the ideas of someone like him could produce some truly beautiful stadium theatre.

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Every chance for 2024,

Europe and North America will go head to head for this race.

Kind of looking forward to it.

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he didn't answer the question at all, but at this time there is no complete answer. I guess they felt he was honest in giving his work he would take responsibility to do what is needed.

And yet we have Dick Pound of all people, not one to mince his words, not one who's tip-toed over the Fukushima issue, putting it as one of his two main factors in Tokyo clinching the win.

A friend of mine without a great deal of interest in the Olympics made an interesting comment to me this morning:

"I hope Miyazaki does the Opening Ceremony."

Interesting idea - I think someone like him could really managed to crush the sterile claims with his ability to tap into the Japanese sensibility. Despite being an animator, the ideas of someone like him could produce some truly beautiful stadium theatre.

Yeah, I've seen it suggested already too. I think a Ghibli-style vision could really make it sublime.

Edited by Sir Rols

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And yet we have Dick Pound of all people, not one to mince his words, not one who's tip-toed over the Fukushima issue, putting it as one of his two main factors in Tokyo clinching the win.

Yeah, I've seen it suggested already too. I think a Ghibli-style vision could really make it sublime.

I think a cross between Athens and London's OC's is what I'd like to see in 2020 - but in a Ghibli studio style. If they focus on the right philosophies and send the right messages about humanity - we could be in for something intensely moving and beautiful.

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I think a cross between Athens and London's OC's is what I'd like to see in 2020 - but in a Ghibli studio style. If they focus on the right philosophies and send the right messages about humanity - we could be in for something intensely moving and beautiful.

With Miyazaki's recent retirement, he will definitely have the time to plan and stage a wonderful opening ceremony. I do hope it's something the committee seriously consider.

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Tokyo is not boring or sterile, but I see where that perception comes from. If Japan wants, if they choose to, 2020 is a chance to show the world how it views itself in the 21st century. I'm very happy for the Japanese.

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A friend of mine without a great deal of interest in the Olympics made an interesting comment to me this morning:

"I hope Miyazaki does the Opening Ceremony."

Interesting idea - I think someone like him could really managed to crush the sterile claims with his ability to tap into the Japanese sensibility. Despite being an animator, the ideas of someone like him could produce some truly beautiful stadium theatre.

studio Gibli :)

could be fantastic to see st like this from miyazaki

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmvS4mzWUkQ

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Miyazaki just announced his retirement...

The Japanese master of whimsical animation, Hayao Miyazaki, has retired before. This time, he says he really means it.

Miyazaki is one of animation's most admired and successful directors. He said Friday that at the age of 72, he now wants to do other things besides slaving away over his drawings to meet feature film deadlines.

"I know I've said I would retire many times in the past. Many of you must think, 'Once again.' But this time I am quite serious," he said.

"This will never happen again," Miyazaki said at the conclusion of a nearly 2-hour-long news conference in which he shared his thoughts on everything from war to Italian cuisine, one of his favorites.

The co-founder of Studio Ghibli, who won an Oscar in 2003 for his masterful, disturbing critique of modern industrialism in "Spirited Away," said he hopes to work for another decade, but at a slower pace that might allow him to perhaps even take Saturdays off.

Miyazaki's studio announced last week that he will stop making feature films following the release in June of his last film, "The Wind Rises."

...

AP

http://www.philstar.com/entertainment/2013/09/07/1182921/japanese-animation-master-miyazaki-bids-farewell

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Miyazaki just announced his retirement...

As we mentioned, the fact that he wants to do other things might indicate that he'd be available to take on such a role. He is getting on in age - but he could very well create a vision, and have a creative team execute the more taxing aspects. I think it could very well happen.

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It's always far more interesting when they do it like that. I've got zero buzz off the lead up to the Sochi, Glasgow or Rio ceremonies, which are all being run along side the model of a production company doing the creative to a large degree. Contrast that to when there is a personality with an artistic vision in the drivers seat - a Yimou, Boyle or Pappaioannou - you get a far better insight at what might happen.

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