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Paris Signs 3 New Sponsorship Deals for 2024 Olympic Bid

Leaders of the Paris bid for the 2024 Olympics have signed up three new sponsors to bring total sponsorship revenue so far to 20 million euros ($22.8 million).

The bid committee announced deals Tuesday with insurance company MAIF, Vivendi and Orange. Ten major companies have now signed up as Paris sponsors.

The Paris bid said it hopes to meet its total sponsorship revenue target of 30 million euros ($34 million) with final deals to be announced "in the coming weeks and months."

Paris is competing against Budapest, Rome and Los Angeles for the games. The International Olympic Committee will choose the host city in September 2017. Paris last hosted the Olympics in 1924.

AP

http://abcnews.go.com/Sports/wireStory/paris-signs-sponsorship-deals-2024-olympic-bid-39001882

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Champs Elysées Avenue will be pedestrian one sunday per month.

Maybe something that could be done during the games?

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Chm_-lrWwAAZKeb.jpg

Chm_-lrWwAAZKeb.jpg

Unlikely- the Paris venue plan will require an even more intrusive system of reserved car lanes for the Olympic Family than London did.

You may be right.

On this image from the official web site, it can be seen a fan trail along the Seine river, but nothing special on the Champs Elysées avenue.

http://www.paris2024.org/en/content/venue-plan

carte_en.png?itok=RIUuvl27

carte_site_olympic_en.png?itok=X2WI77AM

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You may be right.

On this image from the official web site, it can be seen a fan trail along the Seine river, but nothing special on the Champs Elysées avenue.

http://www.paris2024.org/en/content/venue-plan

carte_en.png?itok=RIUuvl27

carte_site_olympic_en.png?itok=X2WI77AM

It's that cluster of venues in the city centre which is going to cause serious problems- far more of them beyond walking distance from the Village than in 2012.

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It's that cluster of venues in the city centre which is going to cause serious problems- far more of them beyond walking distance from the Village than in 2012.

Not sure I catch your point. Do you campare Paris 2024 to Paris 2012? (because the olympique village was closer to Paris Center)

or to London 2012? (because the olympique village and many venues were inside the olympic park)

Compared to Paris 2012, I don't think it will change a lot if you have to go by car for 10 kms instead of 5 kms in 2012.

For the venues that are not closed to a highway (7, 8, 9, 10, 11), I think there going to use the Champs Elysées Avenue as a reserved car lane (as you said).

This Avenue goes from the IOC hotels (CIO pictogram) to these venue (7, 8, 9, 10, 11).

That's certainy why they've planed nothing special (no fan zone, fan trail....) on the avenue.

154565.jpg

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It's that cluster of venues in the city centre which is going to cause serious problems- far more of them beyond walking distance from the Village than in 2012.

Well I'm afraid this is something all the bidding cities will offer. The concept of an "Olympic Park" is dead. Gathering as much venues as possible in one place is what costs a lot of money, and this is contradictory to the Agenda 2020. And you might not forget one thing: Paris is 15 times smaller than London. So the venues for Paris 2024 might look more widespread than for London 2012, but they're really not. Plus, the transportation is quite great here (and will be even better by 2024).

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So the venues for Paris 2024 might look more widespread than for London 2012, but they're really not.

Overall, no, but my concern was just that very particular journey between the Village and the substantial cluster of city centre venues. I guess it means everybody can take advantage of traditional periphery-centre commuter facilities though.

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Here is the Paris 2012 map:

ECH19367029_1.jpg

And the IOC evaluation: http://www.olympic.org/Documents/Host_city_elections/2012_OG-Report_of_the_Evaluation_Commission.pdf

For transport, it is said:

Paris has high capacity and quality metropolitan road and rail transport systems. With a compact Olympic venue concept, extensive Olympic lane and optimised traffic route networks, the Commission feels confident that transport demands would be fully met.

So, as the 2024 map is not so different (the olympic village is a bit more on the north), I would hope the IOC evaluation will be quite the same!

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The concept of an "Olympic Park" is dead. Gathering as much venues as possible in one place is what costs a lot of money, and this is contradictory to the Agenda 2020.

I'm afraid this is a fairly substantial misreading of what Agenda 2020 is.

Agenda 2020 is a process through which the IOC will work with a bidder to try to make sure the plans complement the city's future development. It is not necessarily about reducing costs. It's more about reducing unnecessary burden and the potential for white elephants.

The Agenda 2020 process in no way precludes regeneration based around an Olympic Park complex because the whole point of it is not to be prescriptive. It's meant to be about the IOC working with cities towards whichever concept works best for them.

Let's take London as an example here, not only because I know it best but because it's the best example of what I'm talking about:

London only bid because our then Mayor Ken Livingstone saw the Games as a big opportunity to regenerate parts of Stratford and the East End. If your wrong interpretation of Agenda 2020 - with 'bans' on Olympic Parks - was in place then, Livingstone would've looked at an Olympic bid and said "no, not interested".

Or to put it another way, if London lost 2012 and came back for 2024, could you imagine the IOC turning away London's bid, with it's Olympic Park and saying "sorry, no, you can't bid for our Games"?

Both scenarios would be ridiculous.

Agenda 2020 doesn't remove the Olympic Park model if that's what a city wants to do. Indeed, I'd imagine many in the IOC would still see it as the ideal in terms of efficiency and security. What it does do, in theory, is allow cities to be more flexible about its venues.

Edited by Rob.
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