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Rendering of the Olympic stadium (stade de France) and the aquatic center. 

Because Baron.

Essentially, they're going for the regeneratiion of the St Denis neighbourhood...interesting approach! Their existing sites will definitely be a boost re: Agenda 2020!

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Paris 2024 here we come! Buckle up world, Paris is back!


Agreed. Smart move from Paris not to hold a referendum.

Though support is at 63% and if the French can keep it up, have a referendum. If the support is still at these levels or higher it will only be an even more public display to the IOC that Paris and the French want the games.

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In this kind of referendum, anyway, opponents are more eager to vote than the people who are in favor of the Games. A referendum is the best way to kill a project.

But it's the most democratic way to have a strong bid.

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Although there are sports missing or undefined, I really like the idea of the venue plan that Le Parisien has published. If it's finally something like that, I definitely have a new favourite!

Don't the Tokyo Tower and the Eiffel Tower make a nice theme for a handover ceremony...?

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I think they are also considering using one of the Exhibt Centers for indoor sports like ping pong, weight lifting, etc.: Either the Porte de Versailles one, between the Parc des Princes and the Halle Carpentier, or the Villepinte one, located very close to the Tremblay en France future arena.

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I feel the "consultation" is the better option in such a complex thing: it's a good way to promote the bid and to involve the population than just a "yes" or "no" which is arbitrary and can destroy years of work (the process to present a bid has begun in 2012 with the nomination of Bernard Lapasset at the CSFI).

For once I feel Paris is on the good way, going step by step, with a bid lead by athletes (several french sport icons are ready to back the bid), leaders of the project are good (Lapasset as the (future ex-)IRB president and Tony Estanguet as CIO member, triple gold medalist ), the biggest part of politicians back the bid and understand that they have to step back.

The project himself is cool and reasonable. The Seine-St-Denis part is the most interesting, and the integration into the Grand Paris overall is great.

I really hope this time is the good one, because they said that if it's not we won't probably see another Paris bid before decades.

So go Paris!

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Oh, the distance between the two furthest venues (the Saint-Quentin velodrome and the Tremblay en France colisée) is roughly 42 km. Not the most compact bid (but pretty much as compact as the 2012 bid), but it's not like it's massively spread out.

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Oh, the distance between the two furthest venues (the Saint-Quentin velodrome and the Tremblay en France colisée) is roughly 42 km. Not the most compact bid (but pretty much as compact as the 2012 bid), but it's not like it's massively spread out.

The cities public transportation makes up for any distance issues.

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But it's the most democratic way to have a strong bid.

It's also the best way to give legitimacy to naysayers, NIMBYs and antagonists who would hate the Olympic Games - no matter how many concessions were made.

That said, the Paris mayoralty needs to be straight with voters about the costs, the fact that the Olympic Games never will generate permanent jobs or fix the economy. Provided they do so, and the plan from Le Parisien is for real (with the Stade de France as the anchor stadium to the Games), then the bid has a great chance to win. It's definitely my second choice after Hamburg!

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The only scenario in such a complex undertaking in which a referendum makes sense is if the voters are asked a concrete question that goes beyond giving a blank cheque to the bid committee. Instead it could be something like: "Are you willing for the city of X to provide a guarantee of x amount of money, with the proviso that any additional revenue will have to be approved by another referendum?". Or stage referendums on specific venue designs: "Do you want the Olympic Stadium to have a capacity of 75,000 or 50,000?" etc.

A general "Do you want the Olympic Games?" opens any bid up to attack from ignorant and populist opponents without a clue of how complex such an endeavour is. That's why I'm not too enthusiastic about the Hamburg referendum - I'll only believe my country is applying when Hamburgers finally say "Yes" later this year...

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