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Rendering of the Olympic stadium (stade de France) and the aquatic center. 

Because Baron.

Not sure what polls showed, but I did follow news out of London/England/UK in the years leading up to thge games, and there was much indifference to the games at first. Things started to change with the torch rally, which engendered a huge increase in public patriotism and support for the games. The once the games started, and peope saw all the naysaying not come true, and then when Team GB started to kick ass, support for the games soared.

One of the problems with relying on refferendums is that it is easy to see all the negatives; easy to predict doom and gloom. It's harder to see the good until the games actually arive.

The Olympics can be a slow-burn to excitement but can also be a slow-burn to nothing. Athens and Torino were both underwhelming preparations and lackluster public support followed by underwhelming crowds and lackluster public support. Beijing was Beijing and then you have Vancouver and London. There were protests right up to the start of the Games in Vancouver but the entire mood and discourse changed dramatically when the flame touched down on Canadian soil. And once Alexandre Bilodeau won gold on the second night and the story that was created by that, anytime someone did try to protest they got drowned out by all the people there for the Olympics. With London the government and organizing committee controlled that message so seamlessly with only a slip-up on the ticketing front. It was always a feeling like well we got them, might as well get on with it. Britain's performance in Beijing also had a major impact on anticipation and excitement.

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The Olympics can be a slow-burn to excitement but can also be a slow-burn to nothing. Athens and Torino were both underwhelming preparations and lackluster public support followed by underwhelming crowds and lackluster public support. Beijing was Beijing and then you have Vancouver and London. There were protests right up to the start of the Games in Vancouver but the entire mood and discourse changed dramatically when the flame touched down on Canadian soil. And once Alexandre Bilodeau won gold on the second night and the story that was created by that, anytime someone did try to protest they got drowned out by all the people there for the Olympics. With London the government and organizing committee controlled that message so seamlessly with only a slip-up on the ticketing front. It was always a feeling like well we got them, might as well get on with it. Britain's performance in Beijing also had a major impact on anticipation and excitement.

Faster, I assume you will be giving your full backing to Paris if it decides to go ahead with a 2024 bid? :)

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Conflicted. I really like Boston as a city, plus having the Games in the USA is convenient. A Parisian Olympics is something I've always wanted and lets be honest, for France to have waited a 100 years is pretty ridiculous. And Hamburg is a great chance to finally see a German Games, though my preference would always be Munich for Winter. Plus Rome, while not my favourite would still be an Olympics worth witnessing. If all the bids get to the final gate it would be the same as picking from London, Paris, New York and Madrid for 2012, all would have been (and one was) great Games.

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The tenor is different these days. More people, at least in democracies, want to have a say in what big things are planned to come their way -- something you can't really do in North Korea, Kazakhstan, Cuba and a few other countries.

Not to mention after the global recession of 2008 people in democratic countries are much more conscious of how federal governments spend taxpayer money. There's a watchful eye over what can be perceived as wasteful spending.

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The people responsible for the 2024 Paris bid will be meeting the IOC at Lausanne on June 3, for the invitation phase.

All but one (the 3rd, where I live...duh) of the Paris 20 arrondissements' mayors have voted in favor of the Games, and the Paris' city council will be voting (most likely in favour) on April 13.

Here's for the bit of news.

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The people responsible for the 2024 Paris bid will be meeting the IOC at Lausanne on June 3, for the invitation phase.

All but one (the 3rd, where I live...duh) of the Paris 20 arrondissements' mayors have voted in favor of the Games, and the Paris' city council will be voting (most likely in favour) on April 13.

Here's for the bit of news.

Who wants the games? Who wants to reach the stars? Paris wants the games...thank God!

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A new poll shows that 58% of the parisiens are in favour of the games, but 72% want a referendum. The numbers are going down compared to the previous poll, but I'm not really worried. Nothing quite official has been presented to the people of Paris, so they don't really know what the Games could be like. 2 years and half to change that.

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A new poll shows that 58% of the parisiens are in favour of the games, but 72% want a referendum. The numbers are going down compared to the previous poll, but I'm not really worried. Nothing quite official has been presented to the people of Paris, so they don't really know what the Games could be like. 2 years and half to change that.

Sublished in a Sunday newspaper:

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A new poll shows that 58% of the parisiens are in favour of the games, but 72% want a referendum. The numbers are going down compared to the previous poll, but I'm not really worried. Nothing quite official has been presented to the people of Paris, so they don't really know what the Games could be like. 2 years and half to change that.

The poll was published in a Sunday newspaper:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CB0BzfgWEAENTiV.jpg:large

Anne Hidalgo has also hinted that there might be a referendum in 2016. Her exact words were that "the Parisians will be consulted in 2016" (video in French):

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2lr8q3_anne-hidalgo-le-village-olympique-doit-etre-situe-en-seine-saint-denis_news

Lastly and unsurprisingly!

https://twitter.com/trolympic/status/584799222895095808

PS: ignore previous post.....

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The poll was published in a Sunday newspaper:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CB0BzfgWEAENTiV.jpg:large

Anne Hidalgo has also hinted that there might be a referendum in 2016. Her exact words were that "the Parisians will be consulted in 2016" (video in French):

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2lr8q3_anne-hidalgo-le-village-olympique-doit-etre-situe-en-seine-saint-denis_news

Lastly and unsurprisingly!

https://twitter.com/trolympic/status/584799222895095808

PS: ignore previous post.....

A referendum is a high risk for Paris Bid.

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A referendum is a high risk for Paris Bid.

Not if support for the bid is 60%.

I think all these polls show us is that Parisians want more detailed information on the bid and what it would mean for Paris. Not only is that natural, but it would be smart for the Paris team to work with the public as closely and intimately as possible.

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A new poll shows that 58% of the parisiens are in favour of the games, but 72% want a referendum. The numbers are going down compared to the previous poll, but I'm not really worried. Nothing quite official has been presented to the people of Paris, so they don't really know what the Games could be like. 2 years and half to change that.

Look, no offence to the Parisians - but a referendum would the the last thing an Olympics bid needs, especially when the numbers are merely 58% prior to any parameters even being known. That's like asking: "Would you like a President other than Francois Hollande?". You bet 85% would say "Oui", but any agreement would end once the question about the alternative candidate came into play: You'd have different people backing different things. It's a similar case with the Olympics: 58% of Parisians like the idea. Nothing is known about the concrete details like transport, venues, cost, labour relations and so on. How will a bid get the trade unions on their side? I love France, but that is a very vital issue when it comes to a city that sees randomized strikes on the Metro/RER and political strikes on a fairly recurring basis).

Plus, just in Boston's case, there is the risk of the Olympic bid being dragged into a wider debate: in Boston, the US presidential election is just around the corner and spending/debt/deficit will be a major issue, whilst in Paris' case, surely the general dissatisfaction with the French political establishment and the state of the economy will play a role as well. You will have the usual naysayers who will be vociferously backed up by an over-critical media saying: "We should be spending this money on education and healthcare, not bread and circuses for the elite" (a line of reasoning I myself reject by the way - the people do require inspiring events to bring them together). Bear in mind that the French electorate has a history of expressing its disgust with the political establishment via referendums which have nothing to do with the source of their grievances. The failed European Constitution referendum is an example, as is the narrow approval of the Maastricht treaty. And it's generally easier to just say no to supposed IOC elites, Olympic Lanes, "wasteful" spending, construction noise in one's backyard, the socially disadvantaged being shut out, workers at Olympic sites not being paid properly...and to repeat the words, Montréal, Beijing (or Pékin) and Sochi over and over, ad nauseam.

That's precisely why I'm holding my breath until Hamburg has its referendum behind it - I'm all for referendums and getting the people involved. But given the bad image of the IOC, a general anti-establishment mood and the economic crisis in France, I think Paris 2024 would be ill-advised to consult the people at this or any stage.

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Not if support for the bid is 60%.

I think all these polls show us is that Parisians want more detailed information on the bid and what it would mean for Paris. Not only is that natural, but it would be smart for the Paris team to work with the public as closely and intimately as possible.

Polls and referendum are different. French generally mixes referendum and politics and it could a problem for Paris.

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plusbrilliantsexploits; I wonder if you're being a little pessimistic here. The polling level for Paris is probably not far off what London had at this stage in the process. You say there are lots of unknowns and once they become known support may drop, but are there really? Almost all the major venues are there, the Parisian public have gone through this process before and knows what it's about, and now time has passed they seem in general to be behind a bid again. Is it really likely there'll be any unpleasant surprises once the details of the bid are revealed?

Also, whilst lots of people say they want a referendum, that doesn't mean they'll get one. I'm sure if you asked people that about any issue their gut response would be, "Yes, I'd like to be asked". But my understanding is unless the issue is one regarding the constitution, France - like the UK - generally doesn't do referendums. So that could be a bit of a red herring.

58% looks healthy enough to me for those behind the bid to press ahead, get Mayoral and government support. I hope they do.

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There won't be a referendum. Anne Hidalgo just said she would "consult" the parisians so they can all prepare this bid somehow together. Polls don't mean much to me. Who do they ask? Does it represent anything if they asked to only about 500 people? There's a lot more parisians thant that. I am one, and have never been asked anything. With the futur website like the one Paris' city has set last year (it's a site to ask parisians to give any sort of propositions to make Paris a better city, it's quite nice and has been successful so far), I will be able to have my say about it, and I can't wait to do so. I think it's a smart move from Paris to do that instead of a referendum (which will bother parisians more than anything).

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There won't be a referendum. Anne Hidalgo just said she would "consult" the parisians so they can all prepare this bid somehow together. Polls don't mean much to me. Who do they ask? Does it represent anything if they asked to only about 500 people?

Yes it does; 500 people taken as a cross-section is generally good enough to get an answer with 95% accuracy in a city the size of Paris. And 1000 will get you a fantastically accurate picture, assuming you ask the right people (that's the hard bit).

Sample size doesn't have to be big to get a good answer, but the people you're asking is what matters. Polling companies put a lot of effort into making sure their sample is representative of the population, which is why a survey from a good polling company with 500 people answering is likely to be far more accurate than a poll on a newspaper website which had 10,000 votes.

Edited by Rob.
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plusbrilliantsexploits; I wonder if you're being a little pessimistic here. The polling level for Paris is probably not far off what London had at this stage in the process. You say there are lots of unknowns and once they become known support may drop, but are there really? Almost all the major venues are there, the Parisian public have gone through this process before and knows what it's about, and now time has passed they seem in general to be behind a bid again. Is it really likely there'll be any unpleasant surprises once the details of the bid are revealed?

Also, whilst lots of people say they want a referendum, that doesn't mean they'll get one. I'm sure if you asked people that about any issue their gut response would be, "Yes, I'd like to be asked". But my understanding is unless the issue is one regarding the constitution, France - like the UK - generally doesn't do referendums. So that could be a bit of a red herring.

58% looks healthy enough to me for those behind the bid to press ahead, get Mayoral and government support. I hope they do.

Maybe I'm a tad cautious, that much I concede. However, Rob, you gotta consider that the starting points for the Paris 2024 campaign is way different than Paris 2012. Back then, whilst not exactly doing swimmingly, the French economy looked robust - one of the engines of growth of the Eurozone besides Germany. Fast forward 12 years and criticism of the expenses of the bid are more likely going to sting that they did back then: The French economy is a mess, unemployment at an all-time high, their debt is skyrocketing and the nation's infrastructure is crumbling.

Here's the thing about the public: Even when they don't get a referendum, if they're hell-bent enough to cause something to fail, they will. Just ask favourites Berlin 2000 and Chicago 2016 how that worked out for them. I also disagree that a referendum would "bother" people - instead, they'd see it as an opportunity to weigh in. I'm not saying a referendum (if one were to be called, which as you rightly point out is not a constitutional requirement in France) is unwinnable. What I am saying (like in Hamburg's case) is that the support has to be considered "soft" until the concrete costing, venue and construction plans are published by the Paris 2024 Committee. I tend to think that the problem lies in the overall political and economic environment. Yes, everyone likes the notion of the world coming to visit - but do they feel it appropriate given the challenges France faces right now? That'll be the central question, referendum or no referendum.

If Paris decides to bid, hey, I wouldn't mind seeing them win: I'm just sceptical that the public will solidly get behind this bid, especially as victory is not necessarily assured (queue memories of being defeated in Singapore).

*cue memories (apologies for that typo)

Yes it does; 500 people taken as a cross-section is generally good enough to get an answer with 95% accuracy in a city the size of Paris. And 1000 will get you a fantastically accurate picture, assuming you ask the right people (that's the hard bit).

Sample size doesn't have to be big to get a good answer, but the people you're asking is what matters. Polling companies put a lot of effort into making sure their sample is representative of the population, which is why a survey from a good polling company with 500 people answering is likely to be far more accurate than a poll on a newspaper website which had 10,000 votes.

Indeed, that's precisely why the IOC commissions those polls - a representative sample of 1,000 people are an accurate reflection of the cross-section of people living in Paris.

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Oh come on... seriously? How old are you? The worst is that apparently you're a French speaker. It's even worst...

It's not an age thing. I'm old, and find this stuff hilarious. I also still crack up every time some says they are going to study abroad.

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It's not an age thing. I'm old, and find this stuff hilarious. I also still crack up every time some says they are going to study abroad.

Really? What's funny about studying abroad?

Oh well, have fun you guys! JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO JO! ;)

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