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Laura Flessel became today, the new minister of Sport.

She is the french woman to have won the most olympics medals (5) in fancing (with épée) and was the France's flag-bearer at the 2012 olympic ceremony.

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45 minutes ago, brennus86 said:

Laura Flessel became today, the new minister of Sport.

She is the french woman to have won the most olympics medals (5) in fancing (with épée) and was the France's flag-bearer at the 2012 olympic ceremony.

Indeed good news

124936207SL028_Laura_Flesse.jpg

Also being participated in 4 consecutive Olympic Games is a relevant story.

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Final report: http://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1050430/nick-butler-los-angeles-and-paris-offer-different-but-equally-impressive-2024-olympic-visions

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But the compact nature of the plans was impressive. There are 80 per cent of venues spanning 22 sports housed within a radius of 10 kilometres, although clearly that is not relevant if you are a sailor competing 800km away in Marseille. The sense of being in the centre of one of the world's great cities was striking, with the Eiffel Tower always looming nearby as an iconic backdrop. Beach volleyball would take place virtually at its foot in the Champ-de-Mars Park.

So Abrahamson's point of Paris being the same boring or how another poster from LA thread mentioned Paris as cheaters and doppers? LOL. But the next one is a better Abrahamson shade

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One journalist in particular has been repeatedly writing that Paris would be too much of a risk while Los Angeles offers a new and reliable model for hosting the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games. 

I disagree on several counts. 

Firstly, there are not too many risks associated with the Paris budget and I would not expect it to balloon like some others. 

Secondly, having a privately funded bid does not necessarily mean it is free of risk. The University of Southern California responsible for the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum renovation do not have to provide any guarantees to the IOC, for instance, even if the project currently appears reliable. 

Thirdly, the IOC cannot afford to turn their back on traditional European bids or they would essentially be left with few other choices besides Los Angeles and authoritarian regimes.

There is no one size fits all and each plan could work. 

So, at the end, there's not a lot of economical risk comparing Los Angeles' private funding project. Even in some cases (Like Los Angeles Coliseum, there's not a full guaranteed). So this point of Paris being more a risk is null.

And the return to Europe isn't an exclusive idea of us.

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Public support is an interesting one. I can understand the 88 per cent support figure in Los Angeles because of the laid back apathy we encountered there. I do not think people passionately want the Olympics; they are just not particularly opposed. Yet this, in a way, is impressive in itself. Los Angeles seemed so relaxed and cut adrift from many of the problems faced by the Olympic world and IOC Evaluation Commission chair Patrick Baumann seemed noticeably less tense on trip one than trip two.

In Paris they have done more to promote the bid - although the branding was impressive in both - and levels are currently high. I do think there is more potential for it to gain serious traction, however, including after the Games are awarded. 

So goodbye NO Olympics referendum petition, letter of opposition of Liberation and other conspiracy theories. And the best part of this - Even when LA reclaims having 88% of public approval, the prospect is also really positive in Paris. Here goes another suspiction.

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Security is another question mark. But the success of the security operation at Euro 2016 provided a good template and we currently have no reason to doubt the validity of their plans.

Another theory debuked from Abrahamson team

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Close involvement from new French President Emmanuel Macron could be crucial. IOC members love meeting world leaders and, given that he is most likely to be still enjoying a honeymoon period, a rockstar performance at the Candidate City Briefing in Lausanne or the decisive IOC Session in Lima could be pivotal. A national leader can make or break a bid by attending the vote. Their currently appears little chance of White House postholder Donald Trump doing that. 

Los Angeles' biggest card is, of course Garcetti and he did a great job promoting the bid. However, Macron can be a breaker of preferences (Ironically for the reasons mentioned by some of us).

 

In conclusion, coming from a source close of the IOC committee, most of us aren't that far in our thoughts related of this race B) But of course, some people won't recognize mistakes. Poor of them.

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25 minutes ago, Roger87 said:

So, at the end, there's not a lot of economical risk comparing Los Angeles' private funding project. Even in some cases (Like Los Angeles Coliseum, there's not a full guaranteed). So this point of Paris being more a risk is null.

And the return to Europe isn't an exclusive idea of us.

Yep, something that was even said in the L.A. thread that a "private" bid doesn't necessarily guarantee "no risk". But a certain you-know-who wants to keep "chirping" otherwise. But of course she knows better over a *noteriety* Olympic website like ITG. :rolleyes:

28 minutes ago, Roger87 said:

Even when LA reclaims having 88% of public approval, the prospect is also really positive in Paris. Here goes another suspiction.

I like how Nick put it, that while L.A. may have 88% support, but with their laid back apathy, it's not really passionate. But rather that they don't particularly oppose the Games.

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31 minutes ago, Roger87 said:

Los Angeles' biggest card is, of course Garcetti and he did a great job promoting the bid. However, Macron can be a breaker of preferences (Ironically for the reasons mentioned by some of us).

Who would you rather shake hands & mingle with? A president of a country, or a mayor. Even here in the U.S., many people would probaby rather shake hands & meet with Frump (as gastly as that sounds) than Garcetti.

36 minutes ago, Roger87 said:

In conclusion, coming from a source close of the IOC committee, most of us aren't that far in our thoughts related of this race B) But of course, some people won't recognize mistakes. Poor of them.

Oh no - ITG (a very notable Olympic website) is "downplaying" L.A. :rolleyes:

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6 minutes ago, FYI said:

 

Yep, something that was even said in the L.A. thread that a "private" bid doesn't necessarily guarantee "no risk". But a certain you-know-who wants to keep "chirping" otherwise. But of course she knows better over a *noteriety* Olympic website like ITG. :rolleyes:

I like how Nick put it, that while L.A. may have 88% support, but with their laid back apathy, it's not really passionate. But rather that they don't particularly oppose the Games.

Or how the Pope of +20 years of notoriety is better with his lack of credibility lol.

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It'd be weird for a city to be wildly excited about an Olympics seven or eleven years out. I don't see that as a problem, though I do find it a bit weird Nick Butler noticed a discernable difference in Paris' favour at this stage.

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^Yeah, but considering a certain quack here, & a certain agenda-driven "journalist", keep harping that "the Olympics are at the 'soul' of everyone in L.A." & yada, yada, yada, & blah, blah, blah, then it's a noticable misconception.

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Just now, Rob. said:

It'd be weird for a city to be wildly excited about an Olympics seven or eleven years out. I don't see that as a problem, though I do find it a bit weird Nick Butler noticed a discernable difference in Paris' favour at this stage.

Yep, that's very telling, considering Parisians were mostly wary of another Olympic bid just two years ago, neverthless:

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4 hours ago, JMarkSnow2012 said:

The 21st century version of an old French tradition !

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musée_des_Plans-Reliefs

Oh wow!  Another museum for my next trip to France!

I  like the model at the d'Orsay where you walk over it.  And here's one of the Bay Area (in Sausalito) that I recommend highly.  It was primarily a model to study the tides of the whole San Francisco Bay Area system (before computers could then do that).  It's quite impressive.  THere's one of New York City that I keep meaning to go to as well. 

 

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I forgot this last part

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We were treated to an array of presentations on different aspects of the bid before a packed second day of venue tours. Much has been made of the emotional appeal of the IOC choosing Paris on the centenary of the 1924 Games, but they seemed to be going for Gallic substance over Californian style. 

One clear difference was legacy where - besides some banal soundbites about Paris' being the most "inclusive" bid ever - we heard over and over in a more concrete way about how the Olympics and Paralympics was going to benefit the wider city and nation. Apartments across Athletes' and Media Village sites would be converted into around 4,500 houses afterwards while the bid have toured the country on a promotional drive. 

Los Angeles 2024 talked about "being a bid also for California and the USA". But, aside from a seemingly impulsive proposal by Garcetti to hold football preliminaries across the country and over the Mexican border, this seemed mostly lip service. They talked a lot about a "human legacy" but I am still not really sure what that is. It was more how LA can benefit the Olympics rather than how the Olympics can benefit LA. Although, if they do not have large public costs to justify, does a lack of legacy really matter?

Virtually every member of the public we spoke to knew about Paris' bid. Barely a single person we asked in Los Angeles appeared aware. "Did we have it in 1984?" said one, who appeared in their 20s. "Oh, great."

So, at the end, the Centenary Games story is only a plus, not the story by itself. And lol for the last bit :D 

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^Yeah, that last bit goes against all the harpola that "the Olympics are at the core & 'soul' of every Angelino" mumbo-jumbo. Love how Nick questions a lot of the L.A. rhetoric, too. And in the end, still says that BOTH bids are indeed strong. Something that the L.A. camp denies "downplays" when it comes to Paris' 2024 bid.

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1 hour ago, FYI said:

^Yeah, that last bit goes against all the harpola that "the Olympics are at the core & 'soul' of every Angelino" mumbo-jumbo. Love how Nick questions a lot of the L.A. rhetoric, too. And in the end, still says that BOTH bids are indeed strong. Something that the L.A. camp denies "downplays" when it comes to Paris' 2024 bid.

And still Nick declares is more likely for Paris to win.

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Just like L.A., Paris earns rave reviews for its 2024 Olympic bid

A few days after Olympic officials praised Los Angeles’ bid for the 2024 Summer Games, they offered similar compliments for the plan put forth by rival Paris.

International Olympic Committee evaluators made their comments after a week of visiting the cities for a closer look.

"We have two candidatures that do not present major risks," Patrick Baumann, chairman of the evaluation commission, said at a news conference on Tuesday.

"Both cities have an Olympic tradition, venues ready to use and dedicated teams,” he continued. “They have a totally different historic and cultural background. The two cities have a different vision, and IOC members will have to decide between the two."

L.A. and Paris stand as the only remaining competitors after Boston; Budapest, Hungary; Hamburg, Germany; and Rome dropped out of running because of cost concerns.

The LA 2024 bid has emphasized Hollywood storytelling, West Cost technology and the economy of using existing venues.

Paris would also make use of existing stadiums and arenas, but would have to build a costly athletes’ village, media center and aquatics center.

Still, the French capital could be the sentimental favorite because it proposes holding events at such iconic locations as the Eiffel Tower, Grand Palais, Arc de Triomphe and Palace of Versailles.

"The Paris bid can put sport in the middle of that history," Baumann said. "And there is also the Olympic history, with the Baron Pierre de Coubertin, this is where modern Olympics were born. There is a very strong link between Paris' history, the Olympics history and their will to host the Games again after those of 1924."

The French might also enjoy a political advantage after new president Emmanuel Macron met with evaluators and promised to be an active presence in the bid.

There is a strong chance that — given two viable choices — the IOC will award the Games to both cities, giving 2024 to one and 2028 to the other.

That decision could be announced during or shortly before a mid-July session in Switzerland, where candidates will make detailed presentations to IOC members.

The host-city vote is scheduled for September.

https://www.google.com/amp/www.latimes.com/sports/olympics/la-sp-paris-evaluation-20170516-story,amp.html

 

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7 hours ago, FYI said:

Just like L.A., Paris earns rave reviews for its 2024 Olympic bid

A few days after Olympic officials praised Los Angeles’ bid for the 2024 Summer Games, they offered similar compliments for the plan put forth by rival Paris.

International Olympic Committee evaluators made their comments after a week of visiting the cities for a closer look.

"We have two candidatures that do not present major risks," Patrick Baumann, chairman of the evaluation commission, said at a news conference on Tuesday.

"Both cities have an Olympic tradition, venues ready to use and dedicated teams,” he continued. “They have a totally different historic and cultural background. The two cities have a different vision, and IOC members will have to decide between the two."

L.A. and Paris stand as the only remaining competitors after Boston; Budapest, Hungary; Hamburg, Germany; and Rome dropped out of running because of cost concerns.

The LA 2024 bid has emphasized Hollywood storytelling, West Cost technology and the economy of using existing venues.

Paris would also make use of existing stadiums and arenas, but would have to build a costly athletes’ village, media center and aquatics center.

Still, the French capital could be the sentimental favorite because it proposes holding events at such iconic locations as the Eiffel Tower, Grand Palais, Arc de Triomphe and Palace of Versailles.

"The Paris bid can put sport in the middle of that history," Baumann said. "And there is also the Olympic history, with the Baron Pierre de Coubertin, this is where modern Olympics were born. There is a very strong link between Paris' history, the Olympics history and their will to host the Games again after those of 1924."

The French might also enjoy a political advantage after new president Emmanuel Macron met with evaluators and promised to be an active presence in the bid.

There is a strong chance that — given two viable choices — the IOC will award the Games to both cities, giving 2024 to one and 2028 to the other.

That decision could be announced during or shortly before a mid-July session in Switzerland, where candidates will make detailed presentations to IOC members.

The host-city vote is scheduled for September.

https://www.google.com/amp/www.latimes.com/sports/olympics/la-sp-paris-evaluation-20170516-story,amp.html

 

As expected. But wait until Abrahamtrollson and you know whom keep downgrading Paris as a third rate bid :rolleyes: 

Btw, I read a previous article of him mocking Macron for using a tie and comparing him to Chirac as a no factor even when both people are fully different. Give me a break, Abrahamtrollson.

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5 minutes ago, Roger87 said:

As expected. But wait until Abrahamtrollson and you know whom keep downgrading Paris as a third rate bid :rolleyes: 

Abratrollson already did that. Citing in his latest baloney piece that the IOC is just "keeping nice" in saying that both bids are 'equal' in order to keep the interest of the 2024 race high (but that goes without saying anyway). He likened it to a horse race, where the excitement ensues until the race is over. But the irony in that is, that it can work both ways. Perhaps the IOC is just "playing nice" with L.A. & all their PR rhetoric. Afterall, the IOC still wants them, but for 2028, that is! :lol:

11 minutes ago, Roger87 said:

Btw, I read a previous article of him mocking Macron for using a tie and comparing him to Chirac as a no factor even when both people are fully different. Give me a break, Abrahamtrollson.

Same article - he also compared the Paris 2024 team as "group therapy" for their 2012 loss. I mean this guy is going beyond a troll now, to just plain "a$s"inine! :rolleyes:

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Paris 92, 08

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Paris 12

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Paris 16, 20

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Paris 24 bid

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Paris 24 winner

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September 14, 2017

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Edited by paul
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http://aroundtherings.com/site/A__60193/Title__Paris-2024-Twitter-Account-Reaches-100000-Followers-After-IOC-Visit/292/Articles

Quote

The Paris 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Bid Committee Twitter account - @Paris2024 - has reached 100,000 followers just days after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) completed its Evaluation Commission visit to the city.

During the visit, the @Paris2024 twitter account was boosted by a number of high-profile activations. Bid co-Chair and three-time Olympian Tony Estanguet tweeted a selfie that included French President Emmanuel Macron and the IOC Evaluation Commission during a presidential breakfast at the Élysée Palace.

Many of Paris 2024’s athlete ambassadors also promoted @Paris2024, including FIFA World Cup winners Bixente Lizarazu and Lilian Thuram and Olympians Leslie Djohne, Emmeline Ndongue, flag bearer Michaël Jeremiasz and Teddy Riner. NBA superstar Rudy Gobert also took part, as well as the newly-announced French Sports Minister Laura Flessel, a five-time Olympian and two-time Olympic champion.

More broadly, immersive visuals and interactive behind the scenes videos at the city’s sports venues brought the Games vision alive on the bid’s Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter feeds.

During the IOC Evaluation Visit, Paris 2024 garnered 1 billion impressions, while the Facebook Live broadcasts of each press conference had over 180,000 accumulated views.

Elsewhere, the Objectif Paris 2024 mobile app, which asks users to engage with the candidature by getting active, has already seen more than 800,000 kilometres collectively covered by supporters of the bid.

Paris 2024 Co-Chair and three-time Olympic champion, Tony Estanguet, said:

“It is amazing to see such engaged, deep support for our bid through social media. Paris is a bid built on sharing. We want to share our city with the world, but we also want to share our city on social media. These impressive statistics go to prove how much our bid is engaging people, both across France and internationally.

“We want to continue this superb engagement all the way towards Lausanne and Lima, and ride this wave of support. We have a city and a country united behind Paris 2024, and I look forward to building on this.”
 

 

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2 minutes ago, neige said:

 

Look in the map. Olympic cities - Athens, Mexico City, Montreal, Munich, Sydney, Barcelona... 

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