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U.S. to Boycott Sochi?


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I'm beginning to think Sochi and Putin might have had a bigger impact on Istanbul 2020 than has been reported - Erdogan's behaviour indicated that he could very well could have caused a similar headache in 2020.


After this, the protests in Rio, & what FIFA are going through with Qatar, I don't think we'll be seeing a 'new frontier' games for a long time after 2018.

Hmm. I disagree as far as South Africa is concerned. SA is as solid and sensible as any new frontier gets.

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I got a kick out of this:

The IOC retweeted a tweet from Reuters posting an article that "the IOC will not tolerate discrimination in Sochi."

I wouldn't be shocked if the IOC paid Reuters to post this article to get some better rep. The fact that they are retweeting that shows that they have clearly dug themselves a huge hole and are trying to climb back out of it using "good" press. Unbelieveable.

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I'm beginning to think Sochi and Putin might have had a bigger impact on Istanbul 2020 than has been reported - Erdogan's behaviour indicated that he could very well could have caused a similar headache in 2020.

Hmm. I disagree as far as South Africa is concerned. SA is as solid and sensible as any new frontier gets.

If Brazilians are up in arms about the cost of the Olympics and World Cup with 6 times the GDP, a more evenly distrubted economy, an HDI score an entire magnitude greater and 5000USD more per capita, how do you think South Africans that don't have regular running water and electricity and a quarter of the population out of work (Brazil's most recent unemployment rate is 5.3%) will react? People really need to get a grip on South Africa's ability to spend 10 to 15 billion dollars on the latter of Panem et Circenses

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After this, the protests in Rio, & what FIFA are going through with Qatar, I don't think we'll be seeing a 'new frontier' games for a long time after 2018.

Not necessarily. It has nothing to do with 'new frontiers.' Durban will be a 'new frontiers' and almost everybody's just waiting for its coronation. Has nothing to do with nwe frontiers.' You make such sweeping statements, yoshi.

People really need to get a grip on South Africa's ability to spend 10 to 15 billion dollars on the latter of Panem et Circenses

There weren't any riots for WC 2010. As a matter of fact, it gave them such a swelling of pride. I am sure an Olympics in 2024 will give them the same result. Also, RSA has only some 50 million mouths to feed...compared to Brazil's 180 million.

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Well, it is the Daily Mail, but it's Bach's stance on the anti-propaganda law:

IOC chief Bach insists Olympic Charter will be respected in Sochi despite new Russian laws on homosexuality

International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach insists the Olympic Charter will be respected at the Sochi Winter Games despite Russia's new law on homosexuality.

Russian president Vladimir Putin signed a law in June making it illegal to give under 18s information about homosexuality. The move has been widely condemned and has led to calls for a boycott of next year's event.

Bach, a 1976 gold-medallist for Germany in fencing, told BBC Radio 5 Live's Sportsweek programme: 'The position of the IOC is very clear. The task of the IOC has to be that the Olympic Charter is fully respected in the Olympic Games and for all Olympic participants.

'We have the assurance of the highest authorities in the country. (On Saturday) I was sitting with a Russian delegation here in Olympia and they assured me once again that the Olympic charter will enjoy full respect in the Olympic Games.

'This is what the IOC is about. We cannot, on the other hand, impose laws on a sovereign country outside the Olympic Games.'

The Fundamental Principles of Olympism laid out in the charter stipulate: 'The goal of Olympism is to place sport at the service of the harmonious development of humankind, with a view to promoting a peaceful society concerned with the preservation of human dignity.

'Any form of discrimination with regard to a country or a person on grounds of race, religion, politics, gender or otherwise is incompatible with belonging to the Olympic Movement.

'Belonging to the Olympic Movement requires compliance with the Olympic Charter and recognition by the IOC.'

That appears at odds with the Russian anti-gay law and the issue caused controversy at last month's athletics World Championships in Moscow.

Russian athlete Yelena Isinbayeva labelled Swedish high-jumper Emma Green-Tregaro "disrespectful to our country" for protesting against the law by painting her nails in rainbow colours while United States runner Nick Symmonds dedicated his world 800 metres silver medal to his gay and lesbian friends.

Bach defended athletes' right to express their views, saying: "There is the freedom of speech, it exists and it applies to the athletes. This is what the IOC will ensure.

'On the other hand, we have to draw the fine line between freedom of speech and demonstrations.

'From my own experience as an athlete, I know that as an athlete you need to be protected from being drawn into political controversies. We cannot have the Olympic Village being a marketplace for demonstrations for all the political issues in the world.

'The approach of the IOC and the Olympic Games is a different one. We want, with our values, to set an example that people can live peacefully together despite all political controversies, despite all differences which may exist.'

Thing that gets me is it's still not clear what he's saying. On the one hand he says: "There is the freedom of speech, it exists and it applies to the athletes. This is what the IOC will ensure."
But then he says: "We cannot have the Olympic Village being a marketplace for demonstrations for all the political issues in the world."
So, what does happen if a skater, for example, paints their nails rainbow colours for the podium?
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So, what does happen if a skater, for example, paints their nails rainbow colours for the podium?

I guess if they are female, or a symbol of peace, then there should be no problem, huh.

It's so funny all this talk about the Olympics not being a political platform for anything, but that's exactly what the Games truly are about. I remember when reading about the Mexico 1968 'power salute' on the podium & how Brundage went on to expel the two black athletes from the Games. Talk about making it into political, Olympic drama. It's all really a circus sometimes.

compared to Brazil's 180 million.

Make that 201 million mouths to feed now. Making Brazil the second most populous nation in the Americas' after the United States.

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It's so funny all this talk about the Olympics not being a political platform for anything, but that's exactly what the Games truly are about. I remember when reading about the Mexico 1968 'power salute' on the podium & how Brundage went on to expel the two black athletes from the Games. Talk about making it into political, Olympic drama. It's all really a circus sometimes.

If the games were really apolitical, they wouldn't be competing in national teams. It'd be individual against individual, a la the YOGs.

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I guess if they are female, or a symbol of peace, then there should be no problem, huh.

It's so funny all this talk about the Olympics not being a political platform for anything, but that's exactly what the Games truly are about. I remember when reading about the Mexico 1968 'power salute' on the podium & how Brundage went on to expel the two black athletes from the Games. Talk about making it into political, Olympic drama. It's all really a circus sometimes.

Brundage was a well known asshole though. The Australian who stood in solidarity with the two Americans on the podium was quietly removed from the 1972 Australian team by the (then) AOF - for allegedly humiliating Australia. Nowadays he is revered as Australia's contribution to the American Civil Rights movement.

I'm sick of the IOC's refusal to admit that they run a highly politicised event. For goodness sake, they are putting human beings from every political entity into competition with one another. If they really wanted a non-politicised event they would scrap nations competing as individual entities.

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Makes you wonder how that could've effected all those failed bids from Detroit (which was also his birth city) during his tenure.

I didn't realise it was his hometown. Makes me actually surprised that it never happened, like JAS and Barcelona.

A 1968 Detroit Olympics would have been fascinating. I imagine its legacy today would be as haunting as Sarajevo.

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I didn't realise it was his hometown. Makes me actually surprised that it never happened, like JAS and Barcelona.

A 1968 Detroit Olympics would have been fascinating. I imagine its legacy today would be as haunting as Sarajevo.

That's around the time Detroit started to crash and burn. The riots were a year earlier. Well, maybe things would've been different if they held the Olympics in 1968. And if that one arm black salute was done in Detroit, how symbolic would that be? Might even be one of the more memorable Games in history, with a perpetuated myth that the Detroit Games helped change the course of race relations in America.

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That's around the time Detroit started to crash and burn. The riots were a year earlier. Well, maybe things would've been different if they held the Olympics in 1968. And if that one arm black salute was done in Detroit, how symbolic would that be? Might even be one of the more memorable Games in history, with a perpetuated myth that the Detroit Games helped change the course of race relations in America.

:wacko: That is such a far-fetched scenario. :wacko:

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Olympic Games - USOC backs gay rights but won't lead charge for change

US Olympic officials have said they support amending the Olympic Charter to boost support for gay athletes but cautioned that its main role is as a sports body and not a human rights organisation.

A Russian law that forbids the dissemination of information on homosexuality to minors has been the hot topic at this week's United States Olympic Committee media summit with nearly all the 113 athletes in attendance asked for their thoughts.

But on Tuesday, about four months from the start of the Sochi Winter Games in Russia, it was USOC Chief Executive Scott Blackmun and chairman Larry Probst's turn in the hot seat.

"First and foremost we are a sport's organisation, we're the only organisation in the world whose job it is to make sure American athletes get a chance to compete in the Olympic Games," Blackmun said. "We are not an advocacy organisation or a human rights organisation.

"We are a part of a worldwide Olympic movement and I think what we can do is advocate for change within our movement."

The USOC made it clear it will not be taking a lead in any effort to force change in Russia or organise protests but will work quietly behind the scenes and would support an amendment to the Olympic Charter to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation.

"Anything we can do with the international Olympic movement, within the US Olympic movement, we want to do to make sure people understand that we want all of our athletes to feel comfortable being part of the US team," said Blackmun.

"We want to lead by example and we also want to advocate internally, within the global Olympic movement, to make sure we as family are doing everything we can to send the message we do not tolerate discrimination."

Most of the athletes pressed for their views on the Russian law danced around the thorny issue saying their focus was on the upcoming competition and winning medals.

But alpine skier Bode Miller, who has seldom shied away from controversy during a skiing career that has made him one of the sport's most popular and successful athletes, was clear on his view calling the Olympic hosts ignorant.

Two-times US figure skating champion Ashley Wagner was not as blunt as Miller but was also vocal in her support of the gay and lesbian community.

"For me I have gay family members and I have a lot of friends in the LGBT (lesbian gay, bisexual and transgender) community so for me I have such a firm stance on this," said Wagner. "I obviously do not support the legislation in Russia but at the same time it is not my place to go into Russia and tell them how to run their country.

"But I believe that the best way you can show your support for the community is to just speak about it."

The USOC said it will not attempt to muzzle athletes but would impress on them the serious consequences they could face from Russian authorities and the IOC.

Under rule 50 of the IOC charter athletes are banned from using the Games as a platform to make political statements and could face expulsion for showing their support for the Russia's gay community.

"I want to make it very clear we have not asked our athletes not to speak up," said Blackmun. "What we are doing is trying to make sure our athletes are aware of the law and aware of the possible consequences because our job first and foremost is to make sure they are safe while they are in Russia."

The IOC has said it has received written assurances from the Russian government that the issue would not affect Games participants, including accredited people as well as Olympic spectators.

Yahoo Sports

I think the encouraging thing for me in that is that the USOC is not going to ban their athletes from making statements.

Edited by Sir Rols
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  • 2 weeks later...

On BBC Radio now...

Sochi - the Protest Games

Duration:

1 hour, 30 minutes

A 5 live sport special examines the potential disruption to the 2014 Winter Olympics by gay and human rights groups. Guests include Pussy Riot and Olympic figure skater Johnny Weir.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03fw8bx

I've lost so much respect for those athletes. I've given up, the cause is lost. The Olympic Games as a massive corporate exercise focused on the bottom line, rather than a purely athletic and extra-political event has been cemented. The IOC doesn't care, and by not making a big deal out of this or doing something about it, they condone the torture and death of innocent homosexuals in Russia, and around the world, and that's what is the saddest part.

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/\/\ Grow up, GoNutz. The IOC is not in the business of pushing human rights. They're around to stage sports events -- nothing more; nothing less. The fact that they claim to...stand up for this...or that, is just window-dressing and probably about as far as they will go. People should know when to zip their fly and be sensitive that in certain cultures...this lifestyle is taboo and will never be accepted. LGBT want to be accepted everywhere-- fine. But they should also learn and accept the fact that NOT every culture is welcoming of that lifestyle. The door swings both ways. You know a flame will burn...yet, unless you're some sick masochist, you wouldn't stick your finger in it...under normal circumstances, would you?

As for specimens like Johnny Weir, well...I know he likes Russians and Russian culture....but do the Russian people and culture love him back? :blink: I don't really see him doing sold-out victory engagements in Iran, Uganda, parts of Russia outside Moscow and St. Pete.

It is what it is. Just being a pragmatist.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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