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Will a Munich 2022 bid be favourite?


gromit
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I wonder if it had been better to do the referendum together with the Bavarian elections tomorrow - what do you think Stefan?

I don't know really. Maybe more people would have participated in the referendum, but on the other hand SPD/CSU/FDP all support the bid so it would have been awkward to drag this into the election campaign. At least in Munich, not even the Greens put up anti-bid signs during the campaign.

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FIS boss: Oslo would be 2022 favourites, Munich to keep low profile

Berlin (dpa) - World ski supremo Gianfranco Kasper will rate Oslo favourite if the Norwegian capital bids for the 2022 Winter Olympics, while Munich would do good to have a low-key campaign if they make another attempt to land the Games.
The FIS president Kasper told Saturday‘s edition of Germany‘s Sueddeutsche Zeitung that the outstanding 1994 Games in Lillehammer could tempt the International Olympic Committee to give the Games to Norway again.
"For me, Oslo would be the strongest candidate ... It is simple: the name Lillehammer. It still has a huge impact, the memories remain of this magic at the 1994 Winter Games, this atmosphere. People are still raving about it," the IOC member Kasper said.
Oslo hosted the winter edition in 1952. The recent referendum saw a majority in favour of a bid, and the matter is now with the Norwegian parliament. Bids must be submitted to the IOC by November 14, and the 2022 host city is elected by the IOC in 2015.
Sweden‘s Ostersund is also pondering a bid while Kazakhstan‘s Almaty has already submitted its bid. Further bids could come fr4om Spain, Poland, and, pending a November 10 referendum, Munich also aims to have another go after losing out to South Korea‘s Pyeongchang for 2018.
Kasper said that the election of German Thomas Bach as IOC president on Tuesday was neither an advantage for Munich nor would it work against the 1972 Summer Games hosts, but he advised the Germans to keep a low profile.
"It would be better for Germany to keep quiet for a year or two. Then the German president won‘t be an issue anymore internationally. Apart from that Munich‘s position is quite ideal," Kasper said.
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That's a bit of a two-edged piece of advice. You're in an ideal position, but keep quiet. It puts them in a bind like Paris for 2012 - told to restrain themselves in their bid campaigning to avoid stirring resentment at favouritism and a perceived advantage, but by doing so hampering their ability to counter any effective competition.

Edited by Sir Rols
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It's interesting - here in Germany the coverage about the interview with Kasper emphasise something slightly different of the interview with the FIS-president:

- the newly elected IOC-president won't exert influence, if Munich bid for 2022

- especially due the DOSB tends toward the Summer Olympics anyway

- the DOSB should keep quiet for one/two years until the election of Bach doesn't play a role anymore

- Oslo would be in the best position

- Oslo and Östersund would be in really good positions

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Despite Oslo in the race, Munich should still have a good chance for 2022. And if this fails, a proper Summer bid will probably be on the agenda, but Berlin in its current state (cue: new airport) would be a laughing stock.

I don't know what Kasper wants to tell or aim at, but I'm sure also he knows that Winter Games have much less suitable host countries than Summer, and Germany as one of the possible countries has a huge winter sports tradition and success but will not have had any Winter Games for over 85 years come 2022. Not to mention the big market for IOC sponsors...

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Look at the SOG hosts of this millenium: Sydney, Athens, Beijing, London, Rio de Janeiro and Tokyo. I think Berlin is the only German city famous and popular enough in the world to be able to compete with cities of that calibre. Nevertheless, a games in Rhine-Ruhr region would be interesting, temporary stands at the retired factories and mines there would create some outstanding images.

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Look at the SOG hosts of this millenium: Sydney, Athens, Beijing, London, Rio de Janeiro and Tokyo. I think Berlin is the only German city famous and popular enough in the world to be able to compete with cities of that calibre. Nevertheless, a games in Rhine-Ruhr region would be interesting, temporary stands at the retired factories and mines there would create some outstanding images.

But Berlin is not in the position to make a succesfull bid

it would be a huge mistake from DOSB to go forward with a Berlin bid IMO

IOC will never go to a city where the support is really low

the support across germany would be higher, but in Berlin it would be really low IMO

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But Berlin is not in the position to make a succesfull bid

it would be a huge mistake from DOSB to go forward with a Berlin bid IMO

IOC will never go to a city where the support is really low

the support across germany would be higher, but in Berlin it would be really low IMO

I remember the Berlin 2000 bid suffered from extremely low support, but would that still be the situation there. And if the support would still be higher around Germany, that should still bode well for a bid, since the IOC looks at the national numbers really when gauging public support.

If Japan was able to tackle the daunting task of turning very, very low initial public support across the nation, to arguably the leading bid in that category by the time the 2020 vote rolled around, then it should be easier for a German bid to tackle it on mainly a city level.

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Japan's turnaround was remarkable, I've never seen anything like it before, so until another bid does it I'd put it down as an exceptional effort that would be hard to replicate.

On the question of support though, Berlin 2009 was a big success wasn't it? And the World Cup hosting was brilliant. I understand the politics and attitude of Berliners might make getting support hard at the bidding stage, but other events they've hosted recently say they'd do a good job if rewarded the Games.

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Japan's turnaround was remarkable, I've never seen anything like it before, so until another bid does it I'd put it down as an exceptional effort that would be hard to replicate.

Of course. But if support would already be higher across Germany, like someone suggested, then they're already ahead compared to what the Japanese had to cope with.

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I remember the Berlin 2000 bid suffered from extremely low support, but would that still be the situation there. And if the support would still be higher around Germany, that should still bode well for a bid, since the IOC looks at the national numbers really when gauging public support.

If Japan was able to tackle the daunting task of turning very, very low initial public support across the nation, to arguably the leading bid in that category by the time the 2020 vote rolled around, then it should be easier for a German bid to tackle it on mainly a city level.

Well, since Germany was always a federation, we look very carefully, that not every time the capital receive "everything"...

Another issue is, that Berlin is the state, which receive most of the money out of the "Länderfinanzausgleich" - this measure is to balance the situation between the rich states and the poor states of the Federal Republic of Germany - and Berlin receive more money due another contract, which is linked to the fact that Berlin is the capital...

So people challenge why Berlin should bid due the high debts of the city

Edited by Citius Altius Fortius
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Why would Berliners be so anti?

I believe that you can't say that the Berliners are anti to another Olympic Bid - I think back into the 90s many Berliners thought we have more important things to do than to organise/plan Olympic Games...

I can imagine that there are still many people, who fear that they didn't get a piece of the action/wealth/olympic games...

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Bach claims election as IOC President will boost Munich 2022 Winter Olympic bid

September 16 - Munich's bid to host the 2022 Winter Olympics and Paralympics could be helped by the election of Thomas Bach as International Olympic Committee (IOC) President, the German has claimed.

The Bavarian capital is expected to be among the favourites to be awarded the Games if it bids, having been beaten by Pyeongchang in South Korea to host the 2018 event.

But Munich will only put forward a bid if there is a majority backing it at a referendum to be held in the city on November 10, which is only four days before the deadline for candidates to submit their interest to the IOC.

Referendums are also due be held in Garmisch-Partenkirchen and the counties of Berchtesgaden and Traunstein, where some events would take place.

Bach, a key figure in the last bid where Munich polled 25 votes to Pyeongchang's 63 at the IOC Session in Durban in July 2011, claims that his election to the most powerful position in world sport will help the campaign.

"There will be a referendum and, hearing only a little bit only about the reaction to my election in Germany, it will have a very positive influence on the attitude towards Olympism in general because the reaction has been so overwhelming from the head of the state, the athletes, the political community, the cultural community, everybody," he told insidethegames.

"I think this can also help to create a positive attitude for the referendum."

State elections in Bavaria yesterday saw close allies of German Chancellor Angela Merkel claim victory.

Exit polls suggest the Christian Social Union (CSU) won about 49 per cent of the vote, reclaiming a majority in the State Legislature.

If true, it means that Horst Seehofer will retain his position as Minister-President of Bavaria, a post he has held since 2008.

He was an enthusiastic supporter of Munich's bid for 2018.

But Bach, who is due to arrive in Lausanne tomorrow to meet former IOC President Jacques Rogge to conduct an official handover, will not be able to participate in Munich's campaign on this occasion as he will be expected to remain neutral.

So far, only Almaty in Kazakhstan is the only city to declare it will definitely bid.

But bids are expected from Norwegian capital Oslo, Ukrainian city Lviv and a joint proposal from Poland and Slovakia centred on Krakow.

There could also be bids from Barcelona and Stockholm.

Insidethegames

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Well Europe is living a German decade. Given the tendency of the IOC to often go to the geopolitical leaders of the time, I think German Olympics make a lot of sense. WOG or SOG is a matter of opportunity. I think Munich 2022 is an awesome proposal, since Germany is a winter sports giant and has not hosted the WOG since Garmisch.

Edited by hektor
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