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Step 1: Increase the bid time for the main Olympics from 7 years to 8 years

Step 2: Move the dates of the YOG to odd-numbered years (2020 becomes 2021)

Step 3: Make the YOG a test-event for the main Olympics

Step 4: Step back and watch the continued 'success' of the YOG

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01 - not really necessary as the YOG hosts are not meant to need a huge run in time for new venue construction, etc. EDIT - Hang on - did I misread that? How would increasing the Olympic bid period help the YOGs? Or did you mean the summer YOG bid time should be extended? If the latter my point stands. If the former - whaaaaaaaaaaa?

02 - sharing the Winter Olympics year seems a fair compromise. They won't clash with the FIFA World Cup or really draw much interest outside their hosting region and this site.

03 - by making them an Olympic warm up kind of defeats the purpose of keeping them small to spread the Olympic "message" to smaller hosts. World champs/test events are hosted prior to the big Games for this purpose. A better idea would be having the Paralympics first.

04 - The YOGs will limp on for a while but I seriously doubt the next IOC President will be so gung-ho about them.

I think in hindsight the YOGs are good in theory - just... they are unnecessary. A lot of Olympic sports already have young competitors - Gymnastics, diving etc.

So yeah. Just my thoughts.

Edited by thatsnotmypuppy
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Give the main hosts an extra year to also stage the YOG and instead of hosting the test-events, host the YOG at roughly the same price.

Honestly I think this is the only viable way to continue the YOG.

So hypothetically if you start with the 2024 race.

2014 - Race opens

2015 - Application file and candidates annouced

2016 - City vists and vote

2017-2023 - preperations

2023 - host YOG

2024 - host main Olympics

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It wouldn't be "roughly the same price."

London's test events were spread over a period of six months or so in the months leading up to the Games. The busiest period had only three venues in the Olympic Park open at any one time (stadium, hockey centre and water polo arena). I'm not sure an Olympic host city would want to put on a mini-Olympics with all the security implications, road closures, train timetabling changes, park closures, extra costs etc. that would entail a year before they've got to put on the real thing. It sounds like it would be a not insubstantial extra headache.

The test events are also invitationals, often with only a handful of teams competing. The Youth Games is larger, and also requires it own Olympic Village, which test events do not.

And in London's case also, it would mean keeping the temporary configuration for venues for another year (much of which was rented so add on a year of extra rental costs), maintaining venues for another year with no income coming in after the YOGs, maintenance costs for the Olympic village for another year without being able to sell it off, maintaining security fences around a huge portion of the Olympic Park for another year with no public access.

As if bidding for the Games and hosting them isn't costly and complicated enough without insisting on the city hosting a third multi-sport event a year before!

Edited by RobH
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"Invitational" tournaments are, I believe (not sure on this), entirely at the host's expense--except for travel expenses. Unlike the regular Olympics where the participating nations do pay a daily rate for their use of the Village, all its amenities, and participation in the Games, the YOG fees are much less than at the adult Games.

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And some of the events like field hockey, basketball use different formats then at the actual Olympics. Moreover sports like indoor volleyball and water polo aren't even contested at the Youth Olympics. So the Youth Olympics replacing test events wouldn't cover all the events/venue on the Olympic program.

Though for the Winter Olympics I think it could work. All the venues used for Youth Olympics would be needed for the Winter Olympics. It would also get rid of the concern smaller bidders would about the sliding track. However, some of the events on the Youth program (like the hockey skills challenge) is not held at the Winter Olympics proper so I don't know how much sense it would be to have it as a test event.

Edited by intoronto
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A huge problem for the Youth Olympic Games is that very few even know they exist. They have no media coverage of any significance and they, apparently, don't generate much revenue or at least enough to attract bidders, sponsors etc. Lake Placid has considered the idea of bidding for a youth games but has not done so. I suspect it is because they do not need them. That little olympic village has profited very well off of their sports history and will continue to do so. The place is always packed with athletes in training and tourists. Why go to all the trouble and expense to host an event of which nobody has heard?

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Why does anyone want to save the YOGs? Let them fade into obscurity.

The problem with the YOGs is that they serve no meaningful purpose. All the technical adjustments in the world won't resolve that deficiency.

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But by making them 'the' test event for the main Olympics they will serve a useful and necessary purpose. To test the venues and host readiness while also ensuring that any host never falls into the missed timeline crunches that Athens and Torino fell into. They would be the Confederations Cup of the Olympics.

Singapore spent just under 300 million for 2010. You take out the venue and village costs and its likely the event cost roughly 100 million dollars. You have to ask yourself, is running a 10 day test event over, well, 10 days at roughly 100 million dollars be a good investment of money compared to hosting 35 seperate test events over a 3 or 4 month period at roughly 2 to 3 million dollars per event (based on what it costs to stage a hockey/football/basketball/baseball game in NA)?

It does lack the diversifying the Olympic brand point of the YOG, but it is not exactly like countries lining up to host the Youths are not also capable to host the main events (3 being recent Olympic hosts).

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I do think there's technical challenges with making it a senior games test event that would make hosting the Olympics almost too difficult for anyone to manage - to have everything up to spec and ready for a solid two or even one year period is a big burden. And I also think it goes against the whole reason for being of the YOGs - to give the little runs and also-rans something to shoot for (cities as well as athletes). And I'm not sure, on that basis, they need to be saved yet. If anything, while I have almost zero interest in them, there probably going better than I first expected and are starting to serve that purpose.

What I probably do agree with is shifting them to the odd-numbered years - then they'd only be going up against the individual sport WCs, not the senior games themselves and the FIFA carnival.

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There is no reason to save the YOG... as they do not need to be save... they are going well and they serve properly the reason why they have been created :

- a real training of the Games experience for future athletes

- an opportunity for cities not able to host the Games to be part of the Olympic movement

- to give to the Worldwide sponsors some new opportunities & visibility

So having them as a test events, will not answer 2 of the 3 above points.... No interest for the Olympic Movement...

What could be discussed is the year. I will also see them better on odd-numbered years... so it will allow to have an olympic event every year.... And as an olympic traveller, attending ALL Games (regular & youth ones !!!), it will help me to organize my time and budget ;-)

By the way, among all of you that are commentating those YOG... Who really know them ? Who already attended them ???



Singapore spent just under 300 million for 2010. You take out the venue and village costs and its likely the event cost roughly 100 million dollars. You have to ask yourself, is running a 10 day test event over, well, 10 days at roughly 100 million dollars be a good investment of money compared to hosting 35 seperate test events over a 3 or 4 month period at roughly 2 to 3 million dollars per event (based on what it costs to stage a hockey/football/basketball/baseball game in NA)?

USD300m was only the operating budget... no venues and village capital investements are included in this amount !

But even if Singapour spent in operations USD300m and that is said that Nanjing is at USD500m... the IOC calculation is that it is possible to organize the summer version at USD150m.

And for the winter ones, Inssbruck showed us that it was possible to get them at less that USD30m in term of operations...

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Swiss O, I have some questions.

First, there are already a host of major international competitions that prepare young people for the Olympic Games. Young people have performed very successfully at the Olympic Games for decades without YOGs. Don't YOGs actually help promote an unhealthy focus on sports at a very young age than can rob people of their childhoods? Isn't this exactly why many federations instituted age limits in their sports?

As for YOGs providing opportunities to smaller cities, they are already growing in scale to be too expensive for many cities to host, but without the benefit of the notoriety that comes from the real Olympic Games. Nanjing could very conceivably host the full-grown Games. Lillehammer did host those Games. The lack of bidders does not seem to support your argument either, though I admit that appears to have improved for the 2028 edition. Personally, I see this improvement as an anomaly rather than the beginning of a trend.

Finally, in terms of giving sponsors additional visibility, few people watch the YOGs so how are the sponsors helped? As you pointed out quite rightly and fairly, very few of us on these boards have any experience with the YOGs or any desire to see them. This really undercuts your own argument.

The whole notion of "pee-wee" Olympics is wrong-headed in my opinion and I believe time will bear this out.

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Swiss O, I have some questions.

First, there are already a host of major international competitions that prepare young people for the Olympic Games. Young people have performed very successfully at the Olympic Games for decades without YOGs. Don't YOGs actually help promote an unhealthy focus on sports at a very young age than can rob people of their childhoods? Isn't this exactly why many federations instituted age limits in their sports?

You might be correct. Canada's skating federation refused to send skaters in any of the 3 disciplines because they felt the event wasn't "developmentally appropriate"

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They do on official youtube channels

Didn't knew that... :o

The main problem is the games aren't advertised as they should, at least ask someone in Guatemala and you will see big ? on faces.

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  • 8 months later...

They're a stupid idea, but are they in trouble?

They're for 14-18 year olds...because waiting until you are 19 to get into the regular "Old" Olympics is too long? Aren't most gymnasts in that age group anyway?

You know what being 14 to 18 is called? Being a teenager. A time of zits, gangly bodies, awkward self awareness and goofy sex.

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Going back to the threads original topic, I don't think the games should be bigger, but maybe given more attention and focus.

Thing is, the Olympics themselves are a novelty for most people every couple of years. People watch sports they wouldn't normally watch, and it's entertaining. You also know you're watching the world's best. It's something special and unique.

The Youth Games don't have that selling point, they're a spin-off from what's already a novelty for most. Are the world's broadcasters really going to invest a lot of time broadcasting what is essentially U18s handball, for example?

The Youth Games should be kept small, and should be embraced by the city it takes place in, and perhaps contain a little regenerative potential for the host city but nothing too huge. Think Local, in other words. Make it work for the city and the young athletes. Make sure those that hosted it are pleased they did, and make sure the athletes gain from it. Anything else is a bonus.

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^ Indeed, that would be a sensible approach, if these YOG really need to exist at all, which I doubt.

There are already plenty of junior competitions in all Olympic sports, and youngsters should also have the time to finish school properly, so there is a conflict that the YOG only makes worse.

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As pointed out by another member before, the YOG are fine as they are. Singapore 2010 and Innsbruck 2012 were a success. I'm sure Nanjing 2014 will be aswell.

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