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Sir Rols

The IOC Membership

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Sure the athletes vote, but they vote within the system the IOC has created to work this way. If they're going to leave the procedure for determining the athletes' commission as-is (which will always invite more Europeans -- especially at Winter Games), then they need to revise some of their other selection procedures to start evening out the percentages.

I don't expect the makeup of the IOC to be perfectly balanced, but I do think it is too heavily European right now and has been for as long as anyone can remember. Europe will always have more members than other continents, but the ratios can be improved.

I don't know why you'd think that the IOC will 'always have more' European members than members from other continents and that more European athletes will alway always been invited than those from other continents - even for the Winter Games. In fact, I find those statements to be so clearly misguided as to be humorous! Of the 7 Games between 2008 and 2020, only 2 games have been/will be hosted in 'Western' countries (Vancouver '10 and London '12). Only one is part of 'traditional Europe' - though Sochi is also in Europe, Russian Europe is often treated as not part of Europe proper. And 3 of the 7 game have been/will be hosted in developing countries (China, Russia and Brazil) when no developing country hosted the game before 2008.

There is a clear trend: the IOC is giving the games to non-European, non-Western cities increasingly often and developing countries are now legitimately considered as potential hosts (though Sochi may make some regret the push to allow developing countries to host the games, the success of Beijing shows it isn't inherently a bad idea and while Rio faces a lot of potential problems, it is still early enough that its impossible to say it will fail). As the developing countries (which are home to the vast majority of the worlds population and which most countries are part of) continue to grow more rapidly than developed countries, and Chinese, Indian, Brazilian and other major developing powers' influence expands, more IOC members will come from non-European, non-Western sources. China, with 1.3 billion people, is already an Olympic Power as is Russia. Other developing countries are beginning to be as competitive as most developed countries. As these changes continue, it's only natural that the IOC - like other international bodies - will change in its make-up to reflect new interests and global power structures.

Most people aren't European, most people don't live in the developed world. It isn't right that Europe and the Anglophone developed countries continue to dominate the IOC in perpetuity and they won't - the games are becoming increasingly international with more countries competing with more athletes each year. As the middle class grows throughout the developing world, more and more citizens of developing countries will participate in sports seriously and more states will begin putting serious resources into building up Olympic teams and preparing bids. And yes, over time, the IOC will come to better reflect the diversity of countries and peoples participating in the games. Indeed, I would be surprised if the IOC does not cease to be dominated by developed countries within 20 years.

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No matter how many words you write, you can't change geographic or climate facts, which will make the Winter Games Euro-centric in both participation and hosting for a very very very long time.

And if the perception of the IOC continues to be going down in developped countries as it is now, you might in a few decades not find anyone willing to become member from there anyway.

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Olympic champion elected IOC member

new_member_BG.jpg

©IOC/Jones

07/02/2014

During the 126th Session in Sochi and just a few hours before the Opening Ceremony of the 2014 Olympic Winter Games, Poul-Erik Høyer, Olympic champion in badminton and President of the Badminton World Federation, was elected as an IOC member

Two positions in the IOC Executive Board were up for vote as well: Zaiqing Yu became IOC Vice-President, a position that became available following the election of Thomas Bach as IOC President in September 2013.Ugur Erdener was elected to the IOC Executive Board with the mandate of Sam Ramsamy coming to an end.

...

IOC

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I don't know why you'd think that the IOC will 'always have more' European members than members from other continents and that more European athletes will alway always been invited than those from other continents - even for the Winter Games. In fact, I find those statements to be so clearly misguided as to be humorous! Of the 7 Games between 2008 and 2020, only 2 games have been/will be hosted in 'Western' countries (Vancouver '10 and London '12). Only one is part of 'traditional Europe' - though Sochi is also in Europe, Russian Europe is often treated as not part of Europe proper. And 3 of the 7 game have been/will be hosted in developing countries (China, Russia and Brazil) when no developing country hosted the game before 2008.

There is a clear trend: the IOC is giving the games to non-European, non-Western cities increasingly often and developing countries are now legitimately considered as potential hosts (though Sochi may make some regret the push to allow developing countries to host the games, the success of Beijing shows it isn't inherently a bad idea and while Rio faces a lot of potential problems, it is still early enough that its impossible to say it will fail). As the developing countries (which are home to the vast majority of the worlds population and which most countries are part of) continue to grow more rapidly than developed countries, and Chinese, Indian, Brazilian and other major developing powers' influence expands, more IOC members will come from non-European, non-Western sources. China, with 1.3 billion people, is already an Olympic Power as is Russia. Other developing countries are beginning to be as competitive as most developed countries. As these changes continue, it's only natural that the IOC - like other international bodies - will change in its make-up to reflect new interests and global power structures.

Most people aren't European, most people don't live in the developed world. It isn't right that Europe and the Anglophone developed countries continue to dominate the IOC in perpetuity and they won't - the games are becoming increasingly international with more countries competing with more athletes each year. As the middle class grows throughout the developing world, more and more citizens of developing countries will participate in sports seriously and more states will begin putting serious resources into building up Olympic teams and preparing bids. And yes, over time, the IOC will come to better reflect the diversity of countries and peoples participating in the games. Indeed, I would be surprised if the IOC does not cease to be dominated by developed countries within 20 years.

Good grief you drone on and on.

Host cities and membership are two different issues.

I hope the balance of membership does change and I suspect it may -- slowly. However it's already very, very late. The change should've already happened. Voicing frustration is appropriate.

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He'll be too tried to attend the meetings. Should've been someone else.

I believe he is going to retire so he should have the time!

I'd imagine if he wants oslo to get 2022 he will make the effort to be a good member over the next few years.

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Ole Einar Bjorndalen and Haley Wickenheiser have been elected to 8 year terms as members of the IOC and the Athlete's Commission.

http://www.olympic.org/news/sochi-olympians-elect-bjorndalen-and-wickenheiser-to-ioc-athletes-commission-record-turnout-by-athletes/225473

Bjorndalen seems quite diplomatic. Glad to see a non-European!

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I believe he is going to retire so he should have the time!

I'd imagine if he wants oslo to get 2022 he will make the effort to be a good member over the next few years.

Canadian announcers were saying he wanted to go to 2018. A Greek biathlete competed in Vancouver at the age of 45 so anything is possible (however Norway's biathlon team has way more depth).

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French ski great Killy resigns as IOC member

French ski great Jean-Claude Killy has resigned as a member of the International Olympic Committee.

The three-time Olympic gold medalist submitted his resignation in a letter to IOC President Thomas Bach.

The decision was expected. Killy said several months ago he would step down after the Winter Olympics in Sochi.

The 70-year-old Killy headed the IOC coordination for Sochi, overseeing the games' preparations and building a strong relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Killy steps down after 19 years as an IOC member.

He tells French sports daily L'Equipe ''I'm stopping because after Sochi, at my age, after spending seven years campaigning for Russia, it's difficult to find something as rewarding and exciting.''

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Plus, I'm sure he looked like the biggest fool w/in the IOC for sticking up for a duplicitous nation.

Why? The biggest fool to do so is the one that's residing in the Presidential office.

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Why? The biggest fool to do so is the one that's residing in the Presidential office.

Well, yeah, but Bach inherited the situation. From the article, it seems that Killy championed the Russians in the whole 7-year buildup journey. Since he had the closest working relationship with them, I am sure it is asked...how could you/he not see through their smokescreen?

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Well, yeah, but Bach inherited the situation. From the article, it seems that Killy championed the Russians in the whole 7-year buildup journey. Since he had the closest working relationship with them, I am sure it is asked...how could you/he not see through their smokescreen?

What should Killy have done baron?

After all, it's not like the ioc are too bothered about human rights when choosing a host.

Is it?

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What should Killy have done baron?

After all, it's not like the ioc are too bothered about human rights when choosing a host.

Is it?

I think this is totally fair. Someone had to work with the Russians to ensure the delivery of the Sochi Games. I doubt Killy was in a position to make the type of changes that we would have liked to have seen. He inherited the project and had to make it work as well as possible working within a set of given constraints.

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How are new members decided? Is there an election, or are they appointed by the IOC/member countries?

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How are new members decided? Is there an election, or are they appointed by the IOC/member countries?

New members come in by recommendation. A recent host gets an extra new member (if they don't already have more than 2). And then 2 athlete-members are elected every 2 years. They always try to keep it at 110 or 111 members, never the full 115 membership. Why, I don't know.

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01/04/2014

International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach today announced the composition of the IOC commissions for 2014, with an increase in female members (23 per cent) and a much broader geographical representation.

The make-up of the commissions, which provide assistance to the IOC and Olympic Games Organising Committees, reflects the Olympic Movement’s commitment to universality. There will now be two more commissions chaired by women and 22 more positions held by women in 2014 than in 2013 (female representation from Africa increased by 50 per cent), and a significant overall increase in the representation of members from Africa and Oceania.

The full list of the commissions.

IOC

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How come Rogge could not run for another term as president while that Juan Pablo guy was president for 29 yrs

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How come Rogge could not run for another term as president while that Juan Pablo guy was president for 29 yrs

Rules were changed during his presidency. Sorta like FDR is the last president who could serve more than two terms in the US.

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HRH Prince Nawaf Faisal Fahd Abdulaziz stands down as IOC member

HRH Prince Nawaf Faisal Fahd Abdulaziz has resigned from his position as President of the Saudi Arabian Olympic Committee (NOC).

As his membership of the IOC was linked to his function as President of the NOC, it therefore ceased at the same time.

International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach thanked His Royal Highness for his contribution to the Olympic Movement.

IOC

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Death of Alpha Ibrahim Diallo, IOC Honorary Member in Guinea

15/09/2014

It is with great sadness that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has learned of the death of Alpha Ibrahim Diallo at the age of 82.

A graduate in journalism and civil administration, Mr Diallo joined the IOC in 1994. He was a member of the Executive Board from 2003 to 2006 and also served on the following commissions: Sport for All (1995), Radio and Television since 1996, IOC 2000 (1999), Olympic Solidarity (2002-2006) and International Relations since 2002. He became an Honorary Member in 2012.

Mr Diallo enjoyed playing football and basketball, and it was his passion for sport that led to his long career serving the Olympic Movement at home and abroad. During his 15 years at the head of the NOC of Guinea, he played a key role in supporting athletes and in promoting the values of physical activity in his country. On a continental level, Diallo was a Member of the ANOCA Executive Committee from 1986 to 1990, before becoming President from 2001 to 2005. He also served as a member of the ANOC Executive Committee before becoming its Vice-President in 2001.

Mr Diallo led a busy diplomatic career as an ambassador, a role that saw him posted in Algiers, Rabat and Tunis, Cairo and the Middle East. He then held a number of positions within the Guinean Government as Directeur de Cabinet to the Prime Minister (1975-1982), Secretary General of the Communications Ministry (1992-1994) and Minister of Communications and Culture since 1997. He was also an Ambassador and permanent representative to the United Nations in New York from 1983 to 1985.

A man of culture, Diallo was the founding President of the African National Broadcasting and Television Union (URTNA) and Chairman of the first Pan-African Cultural Festival held in Algiers in 1969.

The IOC expresses its deepest sympathies to Mr Diallo’s family.

IOC

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