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Princess Haya to step down as equestrian president

Princess Haya of Jordan will respect the presidential term limits she introduced at the International Equestrian Federation and step down next year.

In a statement issued Wednesday by governing body FEI, Princess Haya ended speculation she might benefit from a rule change to seek a third four-year term.

“I cannot in good conscience put aside my beliefs and the commitment I made seven years ago now that the term limit I supported applies to me,” the FEI president said.

Princess Haya said she was “honored by efforts” by some senior officials and national federations to amend the governing body’s statutes and extend the eight-year limit.

That was likely to face strong European opposition if proposed at a Nov. 7 assembly of the FEI’s 132 member federations in Montreux, Switzerland.

“I was first elected to this job seven years ago because our national federations wanted transparency, good governance and change and I promised a transformational presidency,” Princess Haya said.

She used her first term to modernize rules governing use of medications and banned drugs after several medal-winning horses were disqualified for positive doping tests at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

However, the FEI’s recent focus on developing endurance racing - and long-term plan to win Olympic status for the discipline - had raised concerns.

Princess Haya’s husband, Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, the ruler of Dubai, is an influential competitor and supporter of endurance racing.

Princess Haya would also lose her International Olympic Committee membership on leaving the FEI. She was elected in 2007 through her position as a governing body president.

AP

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/sports/2013/09/25/Princess-Haya-to-step-down-as-equestrian-president.html

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Cookson elected new President of UCI

September 27 - Britain's Brian Cookson was today elected as new President of the International Cycling Union (UCI), beating Ireland's Pat McQuaid by 24 votes to 18 here.

It brings to an end to the controversial eight-year reign of the 64-year-old McQuaid, which has been overshadowed by drugs scandals, highlighted by Lance Armstrong, and means that he must step down as a member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

He owes his position to the fact that he is head of an International Federation and in his presentation to the UCI he had tried to claim that cycling's position within the Olympic Movement would suffer if he was not re-elected for a third term.

"It is a huge honour to have been elected President of the UCI by my peers and I would like to thank them for the trust they have placed in me today," the 61-year-old Cookson told the delegates afterwards in the magnificent Palazzo Vecchio.

...

full article

http://www.insidethegames.biz/sports/summer/cycling/1016213-cookson-elected-new-president-of-uci

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McQuaid officially removed from list of International Olympic Committee members

October 1 - Pat McQuaid's name has been officially removed from the list of members of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) following the loss of his position as President of the International Cycling Union (UCI).

The Irishman was defeated by Britain's Brian Cookson 24 votes to 18 in Florence last Friday (September 27) following a controversial campaign.

McQuaid owed his election to the IOC in 2010 due to the fact he was head of an International Federation and the loss meant he had to relinquish his membership immediately.

"Pat McQuaid's membership ended last Friday when he ceased to be UCI President," a spokeswoman for the IOC told insidethegames.

His name has now been removed from the list of members on the IOC's official website.

A process will now be launched to elect a replacement to fill the position, one of the 15 places allocated to the International Federations under the rules of the Olympic Charter.

It is unlikely to be Cookson, however.

"His successor will not automatically become an IOC member," the spokeswoman toldinsidethegames.

"A proposal for membership will have to go through the usual procedure and the [iOC] Nominations Commission will make a proposal to the Executive Board, who will then submit it to the Session."

A proposal is expected to be put forward to the IOC's ruling Executive Board at its next meeting in December, who will recommend it to the next IOC Session in Sochi next February.

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full article

http://www.insidethegames.biz/sports/summer/cycling/1016280-mcquaid-officially-removed-from-list-of-international-olympic-committee-members

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IOC drops plagiarism probe into SKorean member

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The International Olympic Committee has dropped an ethics investigation into a South Korean member accused of plagiarism.

IOC President Thomas Bach says the ethics commission closed the case into athlete member Moon Dae-sung, a former gold medalist in taekwondo who was accused of plagiarizing much of his university doctorate thesis.

The investigation began in April 2012.

Bach says the IOC repeatedly asked the university for its own findings, but has yet to receive its decision.

As a result, Bach says, the ethics panel "decided to close this file at least for the time being" but it could be reopened if new facts emerge.

In May, the IOC reprimanded Hungarian member and former Hungarian president Pal Schmitt after a university panel found that much of his thesis had been plagiarized.

AP

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Poul-Erik Høyer of Denmark is the only person being proposed for IOC membership in Sochi.

Yes, but won't there be two reps elected from the athletes' ranks??

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Nine candidates vying for slots in IOC Athletes’ Commission

the candidates:

Didier Cuche of Switzerland

Ole Einar Bjorndalen of Norway

Hayley Wickenheise of Canada

Kilian Albrecht of Bulgaria

Ana Jelusic of Croatia

Tanja Poutiainen of Finland

Sarka Zahrobska of the Czech Republic

Pietro Piller-Cottrer of Italy

Darya Domracheva of Belarus

http://www.olympic.org/Documents/Commissions_PDFfiles/Athletes/2014_ElectionManual_Final.pdf

The two winners will replace Canadian cross-country skier Beckie Scott and ice hockey player Saku Koivu of Finland, whose eight-year terms are expiring

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Wait wasn't this known awhile back?


I am wondering if Canada's athlete has a leg up considering hockey has the most athletes competing at the games and Beckie Scott is leaving.

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Claudia Bokel re-elected as Chair of IOC Athletes’ Commission

At today’s meeting of the IOC Athletes’ Commission in Sochi, Claudia Bokel was re-elected as Chair of the Commission, which is the voice of the athletes within the IOC and the Olympic Movement.

As such, Bokel, a former fencer and silver medallist (team) at the Olympic Games in 2004, will also remain as a member of the IOC Executive Board. Angela Ruggiero was elected Vice-Chair. Ruggiero is an Olympic champion in ice hockey and has played more games for Team USA than any other man or woman.

Claudia Bokel said after the meeting: “I would like to thank my colleagues for their trust in my work, and am looking forward to continuing my mission of bringing athletes’ views to the attention of the right people in the Olympic Movement. It is great to know that I can count on the continued support and valuable input of my Commission members for this important task.”

...

IOC

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Claudia Bokel re-elected as Chair of IOC Athletes’ Commission

At today’s meeting of the IOC Athletes’ Commission in Sochi, Claudia Bokel was re-elected as Chair of the Commission, which is the voice of the athletes within the IOC and the Olympic Movement.

As such, Bokel, a former fencer and silver medallist (team) at the Olympic Games in 2004, will also remain as a member of the IOC Executive Board. Angela Ruggiero was elected Vice-Chair. Ruggiero is an Olympic champion in ice hockey and has played more games for Team USA than any other man or woman.

Claudia Bokel said after the meeting: “I would like to thank my colleagues for their trust in my work, and am looking forward to continuing my mission of bringing athletes’ views to the attention of the right people in the Olympic Movement. It is great to know that I can count on the continued support and valuable input of my Commission members for this important task.”

...

IOC

Bach's fencing pal, clearly on the way to follow his path there...

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Seriously! Get it together IOC!

My bets are Cuche and Poutiainen.

Do you ever stop and think? Those 9 candidates were put forward for consideration by their respective NOCs, not selected by the IOC for the vote. Its the Winter Olympics, there is serious Europe, Canada, USA, Japan, Korea and China to choose from and China already has one of the winter AC members.

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Do you ever stop and think? Those 9 candidates were put forward for consideration by their respective NOCs, not selected by the IOC for the vote. Its the Winter Olympics, there is serious Europe, Canada, USA, Japan, Korea and China to choose from and China already has one of the winter AC members.

No, I never stop and think. It's a wonder my rock-bottom IQ allows me to type these posts -- kind of the human equivalent of a room full of monkeys cranking out Shakespeare on typewriters. It's just dumb luck, really, that I can string two words together.

I understand these are Winter Olympics -- not quite stupid enough to miss that point. I also understand that therefore ACCORDING TO THE PROCEDURES THE IOC HAS INSTITUTED that means we're likely to get a bunch more European IOC members from the athletes.

The point is that the IOC is too Eurocentric and the selection procedures need to change. This is just the freshest reminder.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to rest the few, poor little brain cells I have left.

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The athletes choose not the IOC. Beckie Soctt and Angela Ruggeiro are recent IOC athletes commission members from non-European countries that were elected at the Winter Olympics.

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No, I never stop and think. It's a wonder my rock-bottom IQ allows me to type these posts -- kind of the human equivalent of a room full of monkeys cranking out Shakespeare on typewriters. It's just dumb luck, really, that I can string two words together.

I understand these are Winter Olympics -- not quite stupid enough to miss that point. I also understand that therefore ACCORDING TO THE PROCEDURES THE IOC HAS INSTITUTED that means we're likely to get a bunch more European IOC members from the athletes.

The point is that the IOC is too Eurocentric and the selection procedures need to change. This is just the freshest reminder.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to rest the few, poor little brain cells I have left.

The IOC cannot force NOC's to put forward athletes for consideration and yes you don't think, you let your dislike of the IOC blind you to the realities of the situation. Did you actually look at the composition of the Athletes Commissions, or think about this being a Winter Olympics, thus limiting the countries that would be seriously considered for a position? Did you even realize that the Winter AC members are currently from Britain, Canada, USA, China and Finland? That eliminates 2 of the 5 non-European countries already, add in that Korea already has a representative and Japan is still smarting over the 2012 election and you get this result. It has absolutely nothing to do with the IOC being 'eurocentric'. It has to do with the realities and limitations of the program and the Winter Olympics themselves. But obviously your hast to yet again condemn the IOC blinded you to the simple realities that have seen only one non-European NOC putting forward someone for consideration.

Btw, Australia and New Zealand also have representatives on the AC, so that eliminates the other 2 non-European countries that have won medals at the Olympic Winter Games.

Edited by faster

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The IOC cannot force NOC's to put forward athletes for consideration and yes you don't think, you let your dislike of the IOC blind you to the realities of the situation. Did you actually look at the composition of the Athletes Commissions, or think about this being a Winter Olympics, thus limiting the countries that would be seriously considered for a position? Did you even realize that the Winter AC members are currently from Britain, Canada, USA, China and Finland? That eliminates 2 of the 5 non-European countries already, add in that Korea already has a representative and Japan is still smarting over the 2012 election and you get this result. It has absolutely nothing to do with the IOC being 'eurocentric'. It has to do with the realities and limitations of the program and the Winter Olympics themselves. But obviously your hast to yet again condemn the IOC blinded you to the simple realities that have seen only one non-European NOC putting forward someone for consideration.

Btw, Australia and New Zealand also have representatives on the AC, so that eliminates the other 2 non-European countries that have won medals at the Olympic Winter Games.

Good grief, Faster. READ. I already answered your objections. Yes, Winter Games. Yes, European athletes. None of this is a revelation.

The problem is the SYSTEM. I don't despise the IOC, but I do think they need to alter their membership system. They created this self-perpetuating procedure that will guarantee more European members for exactly the reasons you so carefully described. These bylaws did not come down from Mt. Sinai. The IOC is not compelled by the universe to take this approach. They choose to do it this way -- partly because it maintains European dominance.

I'm not sure why it's difficult for you to grasp that I can fully comprehend the IOC's selection procedure and still hold the viewpoint that I do. Maybe I'm not the only one with IQ issues?

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The athletes choose not the IOC. Beckie Soctt and Angela Ruggeiro are recent IOC athletes commission members from non-European countries that were elected at the Winter Olympics.

Sure the athletes vote, but they vote within the system the IOC has created to work this way. If they're going to leave the procedure for determining the athletes' commission as-is (which will always invite more Europeans -- especially at Winter Games), then they need to revise some of their other selection procedures to start evening out the percentages.

I don't expect the makeup of the IOC to be perfectly balanced, but I do think it is too heavily European right now and has been for as long as anyone can remember. Europe will always have more members than other continents, but the ratios can be improved.

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Athens, its not that I disagree with you (Not the biggest fan of all the European royalty sitting on the IOC). But it just seems like sometimes you jump on the IOC without thinking things through.

Not to sound naive, but the Athletes Commission is suppose to represent the interests of the athletes, making their national origins less of an issue of importance in my opinion. Further to that, current IOC membership is not so much a product of the IOC itself but by the much larger Olympic family that sees the vast majority of the federations being controlled by Europeans and lead from within Europe.

I personally think the idea and methodology behind the Athletes Commission. It has produced a few excellent IOC members (Fredericks and Bokel being two prime examples).

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Athens, its not that I disagree with you (Not the biggest fan of all the European royalty sitting on the IOC). But it just seems like sometimes you jump on the IOC without thinking things through.

Not to sound naive, but the Athletes Commission is suppose to represent the interests of the athletes, making their national origins less of an issue of importance in my opinion. Further to that, current IOC membership is not so much a product of the IOC itself but by the much larger Olympic family that sees the vast majority of the federations being controlled by Europeans and lead from within Europe.

I personally think the idea and methodology behind the Athletes Commission. It has produced a few excellent IOC members (Fredericks and Bokel being two prime examples).

Ok. And I think that is totally fine. But IF the IOC is going to preserve that practice they need to make adjustments elsewhere. Until then, I think choruses of "MORE Europeans??!!!" are totally understandable.

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The two winners will replace Canadian cross-country skier Beckie Scott and ice hockey player Saku Koivu of Finland, whose eight-year terms are expiring

I'd be interested to know if Koivu made use of his 8 years as an IOC member. Did he show up to any of the IOC sessions where they pick a new host?

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I'd be interested to know if Koivu made use of his 8 years as an IOC member. Did he show up to any of the IOC sessions where they pick a new host?

He didn't for the 2020 election because it was in the middle of NHL training camp, and presumably 2016 because that was held later.

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Or Athlete members elected from the Winter should NOT equal those elected in the Summer. Are they just 2 each? It should be to the scale and representation of the size of each respective Games. If they are electing 2 from the Winter batch; then proportionately, maybe 8 should be picked from the Summer set (and only 2 of those going to Euro countries). That way, it would be fairer and more representative. But then again, they didn't ask me.

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