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Sir Rols

The IOC Membership

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Whatever happened to our old thread on the IOC membership, tracking who's in and who's out? Tried to find it this morning to add the following, but didn't come up on any searched. I guess it must have been accidentally deleted as well.

Anyway:

Dutch candidate to replace new King Willem-Alexander set to be chosen to take over at end of the year

April 30 - A new Dutch International Olympic Committee (IOC) member to replace Willem-Alexander, who today became the country's first King for more than a century, is set to be elected later this year, it was revealed today.

King Willem-Alexander will officially tender his resignation as a member at the IOC Session in Buenos Aires in September and step down at the end of this year.

It follows his Coronation today after replacing mother, Queen Beatrix, who has abdicated following 33 years on the throne to allow her son to take over, the first King in the Netherlands since 1890.

André Bolhuis, President of the Dutch Olympic Committee*Dutch Sports Federation (NOC*NSF), said talks had already been held with IOC President Jacques Rogge to ensure that the Netherlands continues to be represented.

"I have talked about it with the Crown Prince and President of the IOC," said Bolhuis, a former hockey player who carried the Netherlands' flag at the Opening Ceremony of Montreal 1976.

"Time will tell who will the seat for the Netherlands, but I am convinced that we will get one member again."

Rogge was among the guests at today's Coronation in Amsterdam, along with Royal guests from 18 countries, including Britain's Prince Charles and his wife, Camilla, and the Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako.

A candidate to replace King Willem-Alexander has already been identified but Bolhuis does not want to reveal who yet.

If a replacement had not been allowed for King Willem-Alexander then it would have left the Netherlands without an IOC member following the death in 2010 of Anton Geesink, a member since 1987, the resignation of Hein Verbruggen, former President of the International Cycling Union (UCI) in 2008, and Els van Breda Vriesman, who forfeited her place five years ago after she lost her position as head of the International Hockey Federation (FIH).

"The IOC is formed by 115 people who play a major role in the course of events surrounding the Games, the biggest sporting event held every four years," said Bolhuis.

"It is important for us to be part of that group.

"The Crown Prince has done an excellent job since 1998 and has always been committed to major events that come to the Netherlands.

"He was also very visible at events and thus he helped boost enthusiasm for the Olympics.

"This was highly valued by both the athletes and the rest of the country."

The 46-year-old King had been the member of several Commissions during his period on the IOC, including the Evaluation Commssion for the 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics and the Coordination Commission for Sochi 2014, until he stepped down from that role in 2012.

He is also a member of the influential Marketing Commission.

"The Crown Prince has obviously been a very popular guest in the sports world," said Bolhuis.

"And with his knowledge about sports he also had an important role.

"That was very appreciated."

Insidethegames

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CAS reject Murofushi appeal against IOC election block The Court of Arbitration for Sport has rejected Japanese hammer thrower Koji Murofushi's appeal against the blocking of his election to the International Olympic Committee's Athletes Commission.

The court said the main reason for turning down his appeal was that the Japanese Olympic Committee "did not comply with applicable rules and regulations".

The London 2012 bronze medallist and the JOC had opted to appeal to CAS after the IOC barred him from the commission over election rules violations.

Taiwanese Athens 2004 Games taekwondo gold medallist Chu Mu-yen was also excluded for similar reasons and his CAS appeal was rejected in March.

Murofushi and Chu were excluded on charges they had campaigned inappropriately, in the wrong places and using methods that were against the rules.

"The IOC welcomes the CAS decision and looks forward to working with Danka Bartekova, James Tomkins, Kirsty Coventry and Tony Estanguet, who are expected to be proposed... for election at the July 2013 Extraordinary Session in Lausanne following expiry of the 28-day appeal period," the IOC said.

French canoeing gold medalist Estanguet, Zimbabwean swimmer Coventry, Australia's former Olympic rowing champion Tomkins and Slovakian shooter Bartekova were elected to the commission.

http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/news/athletics-cas-reject-murofushi-appeal-ioc-election-block-094317349.html

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Qatar new Emir is a IOC member

Qatar's new emir raised profile with sports

DOHA, Qatar (AP) - Qatar's new ruler was the not the first choice to lead the Gulf nation and its growing political and economic ambitions.

Sheik Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani became the crown prince a decade ago - at the age of 23 - when his older brother Jassim gave up his position as emir-in-waiting.

That began a gradual grooming process for the British-educated Sheik Tamim inside Qatar's security and investment arms, which are bankrolled by enormous oil and gas wealth.

As deputy commander of the armed forces, he had sway over multibillion dollar arms purchases and direct dealing with defense officials from the U.S. and other Western allies. His senior role with the Qatar Investment Authority gave him a powerful voice over the direction of one of the world's most active sovereign wealth funds, whose landmark stakes around the world include Harrods department store in London and luxury jeweler Tiffany & Co.

But Sheik Tamim's most enduring international image to this point has been linked to sports.

His crowning moment came as he helped win Qatar's bid to host the 2022 World Cup. Sheik Tamim and other Qatari officials, however, later faced complaints that the nation used its vast wealth to swing support its way from football federation members in Africa and elsewhere.

Last year was less positive - an International Olympic Committee member since 2002, Sheik Tamim headed Doha's unsuccessful bid for the 2020 Olympics. Qatar's capital has been mentioned as a possible bidder for the 2024 Games - an effort that could get a boost from the new emir.

Sheik Tamim - who also has served as head of Qatar's Olympic panel since 2000 - helped avoid an embarrassing showdown with Olympic overseers by organizing the first female athletes representing Qatar for last year's London Olympics. Neighboring Saudi Arabia and the Asian country of Brunei also sent their first women Olympic athletes.

Sheik Tamim was educated at schools in England and then graduated from Sandhurst, Britain's prestigious military academy and alma mater for many Middle Eastern leaders.

His two wives include Sheika Anoud bint Mana al-Hajri, a member of a prominent Qatari family. He has six children.

AP

http://www.myfoxla.com/story/22681207/qatars-new-emir-raised-profile-with-sports

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But he will have to resign his IOC position though. No IOC member has stayed on w/ the IOC once s/he ascended to head of state of his/her nation.

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USOC President Larry Probst in line to become 4th US member on IOC

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
July 02, 2013 - 1:16 pm EDT


LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The head of the U.S. Olympic Committee has been nominated for membership of the IOC, a big boost for U.S. efforts to expand its influence on the international Olympic stage.

USOC President Larry Probst was among nine candidates put forward Tuesday for election to the International Olympic Committee. The president of the Russian Olympic Committee, Alexander Zhukov, was also nominated

The nominees were approved by the IOC executive board. The candidates will be up for election — usually a formality — at the full IOC general assembly in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in September.

Probst is in line to become the fourth U.S. member on the IOC, joining Anita DeFrantz, Jim Easton and Angela Ruggiero.

AP

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/cbdf6f5318794cb7a6d210f20254c935/OLY--IOC-New-Members

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nominees for the IOC membership:

Octavian Morariu of Romania,

Bernard Rajzman of Brazil,

Mikaela Maria Antonia Cojuangco-Jaworski of the Philippines,

Alexander Zhukov of Russia,

Paul Kibii Tergat of Kenya,

Lawrence Probst III of the United States,

Dagmawit Girmay Berhane of Ethiopia,

Camiel Eurlings of the Netherlands,

Stefan Holm of Sweden.

IOC

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Four Olympians Become IOC Members

New_members_BG.jpg

Today, the number of IOC members increased to 104 with the election and swearing in of the four athletes elected by their peers to the IOC Athletes’ Commission during London 2012: Danka Bartekova from Slovakia (shooting), James Tomkins from Australia (rowing), Kirsty Coventry from Zimbabwe (aquatics) and Tony Estanguet from France (canoe-kayak).

...

IOC

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nominees for the IOC membership:

Octavian Morariu of Romania,

Bernard Rajzman of Brazil,

Mikaela Maria Antonia Cojuangco-Jaworski of the Philippines,

Alexander Zhukov of Russia,

Paul Kibii Tergat of Kenya,

Lawrence Probst III of the United States,

Dagmawit Girmay Berhane of Ethiopia,

Camiel Eurlings of the Netherlands,

Stefan Holm of Sweden.

IOC

Oh, the Mikaela Jaworski gal from the Philippines is an equestrienne but she is too young.

How many from these will be chosen? Who selects them?

Do they have various rounds as well?

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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For anyone, how can an additional Russian or American become a member of the IOC? Both countries have two at-large members and an Athlete's Commission member. I thought the limit for at-large membership per NOC was 2?

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The Italians have more. Another American IOC member is very big news and makes it appear as though the revenue deal came with some perks. Perhaps the IOC is ready to play ball after all?

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The Italians have more. Another American IOC member is very big news and makes it appear as though the revenue deal came with some perks. Perhaps the IOC is ready to play ball after all?

Italy has three members. Two at-large and 1 as the head of an IF. Additionally they were all made members before the 2 members per NOC rule was in place. And before you say Switzerland, all 5 of those members are heads of IFs.

I can only think of Zhukov and Probst becoming members as heads of their respective NOC with their tenure being limited to how long they sit as head of the USOC and the ROC.

Baron: To answer you question the voting is just a yay or nay affair. Each potential member gets put to a vote and if they recieve a majority of votes they become members.

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Italy has three members. Two at-large and 1 as the head of an IF. Additionally they were all made members before the 2 members per NOC rule was in place. And before you say Switzerland, all 5 of those members are heads of IFs.

I can only think of Zhukov and Probst becoming members as heads of their respective NOC with their tenure being limited to how long they sit as head of the USOC and the ROC.

Baron: To answer you question the voting is just a yay or nay affair. Each potential member gets put to a vote and if they recieve a majority of votes they become members.

Ok, correction. Italy used to have more. I believe they formerly had four. Am I mistaken?

Great Britain DOES have four.

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They did have 5 at one point. The Italians recently lost Francesco Ricci Bitti who was a member through heading the ASOIF.

Great Britain was two at-large members Princess Anne and Craig Reedie, a member through being head of the IPC and a member through the Athlete's Commission.

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Similar situation for the US: 2 at large (Easton, DeFrantz, Easton used to head archery IF, but no more), 1 athlete (Ruggiero), 1 head of NOC (Probst).

It is a bit odd because I thought you weren't supposed to have more than one at large member, but obviously that isn't the case. Also, it seems pretty clear w/ Russia, UK, USA, Switzerland, formerly Italy that the IOC is not married to the "2 per NOC" rule and will make exceptions for a variety of reasons.

Where is the "2 per NOC" rule written?

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Its within the charter. As said previously, heads of IFs and members of the Athlete's Commission are exempt. I am not sure if heads of NOC's are also exempt from the 2 per NOC quota.

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Death of Berthold Beitz, IOC Honorary Member

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is greatly saddened to learn of the death of IOC Honorary Member Berthold Beitz at the age of 99.

A practitioner of sailing, shooting and rowing, Mr Beitz enjoyed a long association with the IOC and Olympic Movement. He was an IOC Member for 16 years (1972-1988), after which he became an Honorary Member. An IOC Vice-President and Executive Board Member from 1984-1988, he was also member of the following Commissions: Finance, New Sources of Financing, Olympic Movement, Preparation of the XII Olympic Congress, and Council of the Olympic Order. He was also an Honorary Chairman of the Olympic Museum Foundation from 1989.

Mr Beitz was a Member of the Board of the West German NOC (1972-2006), a Member of the Board of Directors of the Organising Committee for the XX Olympiad in Munich in 1972, and President of the Administrative Council of the Olympic sailing events in Kiel, Germany (1966-1972).

The IOC expresses its deepest sympathies to Berthold Beitz’s family.

IOC

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IOC selects Craig Reedie for WADA presidency

MOSCOW (AP) The IOC has nominated Craig Reedie to become the next president of the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Reedie, an IOC vice president from Britain, says he was chosen Friday over two other candidates former Olympic hurdles great Edwin Moses and former IOC medical director Patrick Schamasch.

Reedie was put forward by the International Olympic Committee executive board to succeed John Fahey, a former Australian minister who steps down at the end of the year.

The 72-year-old Reedie, who is already a member of WADA's executive committee, had been the firm favorite. He will be put up for election at the World Conference on Doping in Sport in Johannesburg from Nov. 12-15.

Reedie's election is expected to be a formality.

AP

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/news/article.cfm?c_id=4&objectid=10910822

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But he will have to resign his IOC position though. No IOC member has stayed on w/ the IOC once s/he ascended to head of state of his/her nation.

Pal Schmitt? Prince Albert? The Grand Duke of Luxembourg?

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During its meeting last week in Moscow, the IOC Executive Board (EB) approved the candidatures of nine athletes for the IOC Athletes’ Commission elections, which will be held during the Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, in February 2014. Two seats on the Commission will become available in 2014, with current members Beckie Scott and Saku Koivu both finishing their terms of office next winter. All athletes participating in Sochi 2014 will be eligible to vote. After approval by the IOC Session, the two elected athletes will become IOC members for an eight-year term of office.
About the IOC Athletes’ Commission

Created in 1981, the IOC Athletes' Commission is the link between Olympic athletes and the IOC and serves as the athletes' voice within the Olympic Movement. Since 1996, the majority of the Commission’s members (12 of 19) have been elected by their peers during an edition of the Olympic Games. Members of the Athletes’ Commission are involved in the IOC’s main commissions and working groups. The Chair of the Athletes’ Commission, a position currently held by Claudia Bokel, serves as a member of the IOC Executive Board and thus represents the athletes’ interests at the highest level.

The list of candidates (in alphabetical order) features some of the top names in winter sport, and each is eager to commit to the important role of representing all Olympic athletes:

Family Name Given Name NOC Sport
Mr ALBRECHT Kilian BUL Alpine Skiing
Mr BJORNDALEN Ole Einar NOR Biathlon
Mr CUCHE Didier SUI Alpine Skiing
Ms DOMRACHEVA Darya BLR Biathlon
Ms JELUSIC Ana CRO Alpine Skiing
Mr PILLER-COTTRER Pietro ITA Cross-Country Skiing
Ms POUTIAINEN Tanja FIN Alpine Skiing
Ms WICKENHEISER Hayley CAN Ice Hockey
Ms ZAHROBSKA Sarka CZE Alpine Skiing
Elected by their peers

Only National Olympic Committees (NOCs) with an athletes’ commission meeting the IOC criteria were eligible to put forward a candidate. The candidates themselves must have taken part in the Vancouver 2010 Games or be taking part in the Sochi 2014 Games.

All athletes participating at Sochi 2014 will be eligible to vote. They will be asked to elect two candidates from two different sports to ensure a varied representation from the Olympic sports programme. Voting offices will be set up in each of the three Olympic Villages.


Hope WICKENHEISER is elected to replace Beckie Scott.

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USOC head Larry Probst elected to IOC, becoming 4th US member on the Olympic body

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — The head of the U.S. Olympic Committee has been elected to the IOC, a big boost for the U.S. to regain influence on the Olympic stage.

USOC President Larry Probst made it onto the International Olympic Committee on Tuesday with 71 votes in favor and 20 against.


Probst, chairman of video game publisher Electronic Arts Inc., becomes the fourth U.S. member on the IOC, joining Anita DeFrantz, Jim Easton and Angela Ruggiero.

The president of the Russian Olympic Committee, Alexander Zhukov, also won a place on the IOC but with more negative votes in the secret balloting than Probst. The count was 63-29, with two abstentions.

...

AP

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/6acddbd2374644698b841ca0aba639ea/OLY--IOC-New-Members

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10/09/2013

IOC Session elects nine new members

The final day of the 125th IOC Session taking place in Buenos Aires, Argentina, kicked off with the election of the following nine new IOC members:

-Octavian Morariu of Romania, candidature as an individual member

-Bernard Rajzman of Brazil, candidature as an individual member

-Mikaela Maria Antonia Cojuangco-Jaworski of the Philippines, candidature as an individual member

-Alexander Zhukov of Russia, candidature linked to his function within an NOC

-Paul Kibii Tergat of Kenya, candidature as an individual member

-Lawrence Probst III of the United States, candidature linked to his function within an NOC

-Dagmawit Girmay Berhane of Ethiopia, candidature as an individual member

-Camiel Eurlings of the Netherlands, candidature as an individual member

-Stefan Holm of Sweden, candidature linked to his function as active athlete

With these new additions, the Session – the supreme decision-making body of the IOC - now comprises 112 members who are individuals, active athletes or representatives of International Federations (IFs) and National Olympic Committees (NOCs).

Presidential election as today’s landmark event

The nine new members will not take part in any of today’s votes, including the election of the new IOC President, who will be announced at 12.30 p.m. local time in Buenos Aires. The Session meeting and announcement ceremony will be broadcast live on www.olympic.org .

Honorary Members

Kevan Gosper and Lamine Diack, whose IOC membership terminates at the end of 2013 as they have reached the age limit, were appointed to become honorary members at the end of the year. Both have served as IOC members for over 10 years.

...

IOC

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USOC head Larry Probst elected to IOC, becoming 4th US member on the Olympic body

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — The head of the U.S. Olympic Committee has been elected to the IOC, a big boost for the U.S. to regain influence on the Olympic stage.

USOC President Larry Probst made it onto the International Olympic Committee on Tuesday with 71 votes in favor and 20 against.

Probst, chairman of video game publisher Electronic Arts Inc., becomes the fourth U.S. member on the IOC, joining Anita DeFrantz, Jim Easton and Angela Ruggiero.

The president of the Russian Olympic Committee, Alexander Zhukov, also won a place on the IOC but with more negative votes in the secret balloting than Probst. The count was 63-29, with two abstentions.

...

AP

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/6acddbd2374644698b841ca0aba639ea/OLY--IOC-New-Members

That's good news. But I don't think Easton's going to be there for long. I hear he's quite sick. So he won't be able to travel much in the coming years.

Gosh, I don't know how Ms. Cojuangco-Jaworski from the Philippines made it, other than she's an equestrian and a first cousin of the current Philippine president? Just another decorative appointment.

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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So of the 9 new members, 4 AGAIN from Europe and the other 5 are from elsewhere. So at least, the balance if shifting. And the 2 new ladies are from the non-traditional male-dominated countries. So the IOC is indeed progressing.

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