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I hear of those early "jumbotrons" for the first time. Where did you read or hear that?

fernsehstube.jpg

And here's a picture of one of the TV cameras they used at Berlin's Olympic Stadium. No wonder that some spectators confused them with cannons. ;)

A good 25 yrs ago when I first really got interested in Olympic history and started immersing myself in it, one of the earlier books I picked up (and I forget now which one) said that...that the projections were put in public parks and beer gardens. And being a "first," I always remembered that...altho I always wondered how come they already had big TV screens back then. Obviously, that source was incorrect and looking back now, projected that piece of history to today's events when they had similar things in London.

(Also, I corrected that Bryan Pinkall (is that his name?) when he wrote in his blog that the 1956 Stockholm Equestrian Games had the first TRIPLE cauldrons lit at an OC. That was indeed the impression given by the Official Records. But I got a personal letter from the late Swedish Olympic historian Wolf Lyberg, who was present at the event and lived around the stadium and he debunked that story. He further acknowledged to me that the OR for those Games were incorrect in that regard. He said that the 2 runners who went up the beacon towers NEVER lit the beacons on Opening day. They merely waved their torches from atop. And this was occasionally done sometime during the week of competition. And that is from an actual, reliable eyewitness of the events of that day. [Footnote 58, page 96 in the 2012 edition of my book.] )

Thanks for posting those photos, Fab. Now it all makes sense.

But it just SHOWS ya that some history books and even Official Records are incorrect. ;)

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I must emphasise, though, that I don't know whether the picture from inside that "Fernsehstube" was taken during the Olympics. The first TV station in Berlin started broadcasting in 1935 and it also broadcasted after the Berlin Games, so the picture was probably taken outside the Olympic period.

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I think the main thing was to show off the technology rather than being able to have scores of people really enjoy the athletic competitions being televised. There probably wasn't even anything like the selling of TV broadcast rights then. 1936 was like the advent of color TV in its appearance in Tokyo 1964. Many sources, including the IOC website, like to claim that Grenoble 1968 was the first Olympics fully telecast in color. For the US market, this was so because ABC committed to telecasting its first Olympic Games in full color. Also, there were already several million color TV sets in the US by winter 1968.

However, technically, Tokyo 1964 was actually the first when limited events were chosen to be telecast over the color system developed by Toshiba but was NOT ready for a full roll-out because it was still in its infancy, and there weren't that many home color TV sets in Japan (as there were in the US. Also, the Toshiba system was incompatible with the NTSC color signal chosen for the US.) Only limited events (the OC, Sumo wrestling and certain indoor volleyball matches) were chosen for the Japanese colorcast trials.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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However, technically, Tokyo 1964 was actually the first when limited events were chosen to be telecast over the color system developed by Toshiba but was NOT ready for a full roll-out because it was still in its infancy, and there weren't that many home color TV sets in Japan (as there were in the US. Also, the Toshiba system was incompatible with the NTSC color signal chosen for the US.) Only limited events (the OC, Sumo wrestling and certain indoor volleyball matches) were chosen for the Japanese colorcast trials.

That's true. Now that you mentioned it I remembered the following post of mine from 2009 after I had found a clip of the original Japanese opening ceremony colour telecast on YouTube. Sadly, the account of the guy who had posted it has apparently been closed due to copyright breaches - so the video doesn't exist anymore either:

There are already clips of the Tokyo 1964 opening ceremony on YouTube, but this one is special: It seems to be from the original live broadcast of Japanese television -- in colour! This was probably the first colour broadcast of an Olympic opening ceremony ever.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zS4Al0aireI

http://www.gamesbids.com/forums/topic/4114-ceremonies-on-youtube/?p=215492

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