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Very fair point. Okay, so how about spinning it this way.. use the whole college/university aspect of the city that they could wind up basing the bid on and say how it will turn Boston into a true center of youth sport in the United States. A little far-fetched maybe since many other cities could make a similar claim, but it's certainly something different than the legacy left in Los Angeles and Atlanta or what New York and Chicago were offering.

Well, it's a start. And unless you've got an obvious selling point - like being a new frontier host - it's a challenge for any potential bidder to clarify a good "story": to sell to the IOC.

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Boston, Massachusetts is taking the first big steps towards looking into the feasibility of a Summer Games bid for the earliest year 2024. On Thursday, January 10, 2013, the MA State Senate file a Re

Oslo was an abortion - Boston is a miscarriage.

We prefer "Masshole" to "total douche".

Good to hear. The Summer Games advocates here (I can think of one in particular who so far has NOT yet chimed in on this thread) are so starved for possible US 2024 bids that your appearance, certainly caused a hubbub. I think Boston is a great city, and at the end of the day, if it should be Boston, I hope it can be prepared to meet and match possibly the likes of Durban and Paris in the final showdown in fall 2017. Be ready to have a $50 million warchest as well; I am sure you will hear that from the USOC when you start talks with them.

I haven't chimed in so far. Mainly because I'm just not in the mood for rancorous debate. I'm happy to disagree quietly and let others fight it out. It appears that's exactly what's happened.

I don't know if there's a dearth of summer candidates or not. I'm certainly not in favor of dressing up an inadequate bid and trying to pass it off as a legit contender. (This can happen with either summer or winter editions of the Games, *cough* Reno *cough*). For the eight-millionth time, I'd prefer to see summer Games before winter Games, but not at any cost. I don't know if there's a viable summer candidate out there or not. Others may choose to "lean strongly" to a particular conclusion (or whatever their preferred verbiage might be), but I'd rather just wait and see what happens.

I like Boston, but it appears to me that the Games have outgrown the city. I will be curious to see what surfaces in the way of plans, but I question whether this exploratory study will result in a bid, much less a win.

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It seems that Harvard could have a key role in this and I don't think there's a need to touch our endowment to build the Olympic stadium. I think the Harvard alumni will be very excited to bring the Olympics to the school/city and donations will make it happen. An Olympics that celebrates healthy minds and bodies and the athlete scholars sounds kinda new. I know Boston is not Paris but if Istanbul wins, I don't think Europe will have a chance in 2024. If Boston plays the (I'm the greatest college town on earth) card, the IOC might listen.

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Europe will definitely have a chance for 2024 even if Istanbul wins 2020. This type of situation didn't stop Munich & Annecy from bidding for 2018, despite Sochi hosting 2014. It also didn't stop their supporters in thinking the same.

The IOC is a very Euro-Centric organization, & the U.S. needs to first think of a strategy versus if Europe is going to be in the picture or not. And especially if South Africa gets cold feet again, then Europe is definitely a contender for 2024 even if Istanbul gets 2020.

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I have to agree that the IOC being Euro-Centric. Yes, there should different U.S. approaches to 2024 based on possible South African bid and a European Olympics in 2020. If Tokyo wins, 2024 race might be a very exciting one! I really hope the the USOC is actually working right now on different plans for their next bid but there's no indication that they are very engaged right now.

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It seems that Harvard could have a key role in this and I don't think there's a need to touch our endowment to build the Olympic stadium. I think the Harvard alumni will be very excited to bring the Olympics to the school/city and donations will make it happen. An Olympics that celebrates healthy minds and bodies and the athlete scholars sounds kinda new. I know Boston is not Paris but if Istanbul wins, I don't think Europe will have a chance in 2024. If Boston plays the (I'm the greatest college town on earth) card, the IOC might listen.

I don't know if Harvard might be all that cool about an Olympics.

#1 - It will cost them a lot of $$$.

#2 - It will detract from many projects lined up including

#3 - sidetracking many possible Nobel candidacies there.

Which is more important to Harvard? An Olympics (which would be in Boston's name anyway) or continued grip on Nobel prizes?

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I feel that people can relate more to the Olympics than a Nobel Prize, but it is a university after all. I have to admit that finding the right spot for the Olympic stadium will be a challenge without a direct involvement by Harvard and the remaining schools in Boston.

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I feel that people can relate more to the Olympics than a Nobel Prize, but it is a university after all. I have to admit that finding the right spot for the Olympic stadium will be a challenge without a direct involvement by Harvard and the remaining schools in Boston.

I think the academics and researchers on tight deadlines and competing against other teams elsewhere, might feel differently. Even a month's delay in a competitive calendar could cost them dearly in terms of funding, patents and recognition, including as mentioned, the prestigous prizes.

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Personally, I don't see Harvard as the biggest key player in a Boston bid. I believe Harvard would get on board if a bid was in the works and I think they'd do so enthusiastically. The real issue is the money and the civic leadership. Without that there's nothing.

In the end, I still think they'll be foiled by logistical considerations, but that's just me.

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Not only Harvard #1 wealthiest in the world. We also have MIT ranked in #6th, as well as other huge ones like BU, BC, Suffolk, Tufts, Umass Boston and Northeastern U . If Boston 2024 will become a bid one day, all of these would have to come together, the City belongs to them.

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Not only Harvard #1 wealthiest in the world. We also have MIT ranked in #6th, as well as other huge ones like BU, BC, Suffolk, Tufts, Umass Boston and Northeastern U . If Boston 2024 will become a bid one day, all of these would have to come together, the City belongs to them.

If Boston 2024 depends upon BU and BC "coming together", it's dooooomed.

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Not only Harvard #1 wealthiest in the world. We also have MIT ranked in #6th, as well as other huge ones like BU, BC, Suffolk, Tufts, Umass Boston and Northeastern U . If Boston 2024 will become a bid one day, all of these would have to come together, the City belongs to them.

Absolutely.

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Boston ranks 4th Best City to live in America according to Businessweek magazine!

http://images.businessweek.com/slideshows/2012-09-26/americas-50-best-cities.html#slide48

Want to support a Summer Olympic Bid effort for Boston in 2024? Follow our team's website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter!

http://www.boston-2024.org

http://www.facebook.com/boston2024

' class="bbc_url">@boston_2024

-Boston Olympic Exploratory Committee



@@Boston_2024

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Boston ranks 4th Best City to live in America according to Businessweek magazine!

http://images.businessweek.com/slideshows/2012-09-26/americas-50-best-cities.html#slide48

Want to support a Summer Olympic Bid effort for Boston in 2024? Follow our team's website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter!

http://www.boston-2024.org

http://www.facebook.com/boston2024

' class="bbc_url">@boston_2024

-Boston Olympic Exploratory Committee

@@Boston_2024

So? One magazine ranks it as a nice city? But then again all the cities on that list we nice. This list doesn't prove anything that pushes the idea that Boston should host.

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So? One magazine ranks it as a nice city? But then again all the cities on that list we nice. This list doesn't prove anything that pushes the idea that Boston should host.

WHAT? :blink: So only if it's on the WORST Place to live should a wannabee city shun it? What r u smoking? Every wannabee city adds things like these as feathers in its cap!! I totally don't get your illogic. :rolleyes:

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WHAT? :blink: So only if it's on the WORST Place to live should a wannabee city shun it? What r u smoking? Every wannabee city adds things like these as feathers in its cap!! I totally don't get your illogic. :rolleyes:

No. I think you're not understanding what I tried to say. Once I posted it i wanted to edit it but that's not possible. I think boston is nice and it's a great city. But there are many nice cities. And just because a city is nice doesn't mean it should bid for the games.

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No. I think you're not understanding what I tried to say. Once I posted it i wanted to edit it but that's not possible. I think boston is nice and it's a great city. But there are many nice cities. And just because a city is nice doesn't mean it should bid for the games.

True. But being a "nice" city sure helps when you're trying to get the IOC to vote for you.

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I think being a university/college city, Boston should be more focused on a Unversiade first, to see if it has the ability to stage a large Olympic type event.

It can build whatever venues they want because unlike say the Youth Olympics, they're not bound by having to use what they have, temporary venues and only minimal new venues.

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Quickly threw together a map of some large areas of land that would be the best bets for a stadium location in the Boston area. Surprisingly, all of them are located near an MBTA station except for one in South Boston.

http://goo.gl/maps/QqSXM

[Locations in Boston's city limits are in blue, in Everett in orange, and in Revere in yellow]

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Quickly threw together a map of some large areas of land that would be the best bets for a stadium location in the Boston area. Surprisingly, all of them are located near an MBTA station except for one in South Boston.

http://goo.gl/maps/QqSXM

[Locations in Boston's city limits are in blue, in Everett in orange, and in Revere in yellow]

Had no idea you could draw and make your own maps quickly on GoogleMaps—pretty sweet! There's a few other areas of unused land on the South Boston waterfront I'd be curious about for future use that you didn't highlight. I know land there is quickly being sold and developed but what about all the area around or behind the convention center?

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Had no idea you could draw and make your own maps quickly on GoogleMaps—pretty sweet! There's a few other areas of unused land on the South Boston waterfront I'd be curious about for future use that you didn't highlight. I know land there is quickly being sold and developed but what about all the area around or behind the convention center?

There is no land available in the South Boston Waterfront District.

The land near the Exhibition Center is going to be used for expansions to the BCEC and hotels. The parking lots to the north of the BCEC are all slated to be a part of the Seaport Square development. The land near the Harpoon Brewery and Dry Dock Square is owned by Massport, and they probably/most likely need it so I don't think that land would be available.

Saying that, even those locations on the map are not simple.

Five of them are not within Boston's city limits. Boston stopped annexing its suburbs earlier than most other cities so these locations are not too far away from the city center and all of the ones outside of Boston's borders are also near MBTA stations.

The North Allston location near Barry's Corner requires a lot of cooperation with Harvard. Frankly, their master plan for the area is totally falling apart so there might be an opportunity to use the area but its still a total question mark.

The MBTA has not been positive about moving MBTA maintenance facilities in the past. With the state behind an Olympic bid they might put pressure on them but its still a logistical issue that would need to be figured out, so Brickbottom and the two South Boston rail yards south of South Station are not sure things.

Newmarket and the Bayside Expo Center would require eminent domain. I wouldn't have a problem with demolishing a bunch of big box stores or a the old, redundant convention center (Boston has three) but other might.

Putting something over the South Bay Interchange would require a lot of infrastructural work. There was a supertall skyscraper that was proposed for the area that fell through because of issues with its height, so I guess its possible. Frankly, decking over that interchange would be the best legacy possible for any Olympics.

And the South Boston land near Medal of Honor Park and Castle Island might be owned by MassPort, might not be owned by them. I have no idea whats going on with that.

CSX is moving their Allston rail yard to Worcester which frees up that land, so thats the only land thats just totally open and inside Boston city limits.

So yeah, getting a stadium site is tough. However, it's not impossible and if Boston can get that done it instantly elevates their bid to the top of American cities because comparing Boston's history, sports, and culture to say, Minneapolis, is an exercise in cruelty for Minneapolis.

And this all also not going into any substantial or overly controversial eminent domain. If you allow that, and I would be very wary of that happening, then that opens up more possibilites.

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First post here, as a Boston local, and casual fan of the idea of the city hosting the summer games, ever since that logo was designed back in, what 2008? There's certainly lots of obstacles to Boston hosting the games, but thats true of any city. I hope my thoughts are useful to the conversation, but I admit that I might be repeating some stuff that has already been said (its a long thread, after all).

One of the bigger ones is certainly a general culture of corruption amongst much of the municipal gov't and developers (the mayor seems to treat developments in the city like his own personal game of SimCity at times), but there's also plenty of opportunities. On the one hand, there is a general mindset amongst most of the movers and shakers in the city strongly in support of redeveloping much of the city. On the other hand, we've got a *long* track record of projects getting delayed, cancelled, dropped halfway through (among many notorious examples, the redevelopment of an almost historic Filene's building right in downtown got sidetracked... *after* it was demolished, leaving a literal gaping hole in the middle of one of the city's major shopping centers). As an eternal optimist, I can't help but view the tendency of projects to get lost in City Hall as a possible advantage: The population is already exposed to the idea of building X or neighborhood Y getting rebuilt, and the existing plans are almost as likely to not happen as they are to happen, leaving plenty of opportunities. My general philosophy is to not displace any residential locations, no matter what (even though there's many that the city would be better off if the buildings themselves were razed), but lower density, economically obsolete industrial/commercial locations should be considered for replacement.

I want to acknowledge that this is just a list of possibile locations that I know the local government (or population) wants to redevelop (and areas that are similar to those), in general. They wouldn't necessarily have support if activists just said "Lets tear down this obsolete building and build the Olympic Village here," without that context, but I'm looking at these sites more through the lens of "We want to redevelop these places anyway, and the other projects keep getting sidetracked, lets build the Olympic Village there instead." It might also help to inspire the developers and city to get more disciplined with their other projects, as some of their favorite perennial targets get snatched up by the Olympics.

The city and state have been trying to get the land over the highways in the city developed for the longest time, and they could likely be a good fit for some of the more narrow structures needed for the games (such as the Village), and there's certain places where they could support something wider. In particular:

* I-90 between the South Bay Interchange and Copley Plaza/Back Bay station. The buildings to the south of the highway, on the eastern half of that stretch, are generally industrial facilities that people won't miss. In particular, the old Boston Herald building is slated for redevelopment at the moment (corner of Harrison Ave and Herald St.).

* I-90 between Hynes Convention Center and Mountfort St. (Boston University). Everything along the highway there is too built up/historic to build over (other than the parking lot between Beacon St. and Brookline Ave, next to Fenway Park), but the area is a perennial target for building over.

* I-90 from the CSX Railyard (slated for redevelopment itself, as noted in the map), through Brighton (part of Boston, for non-natives). Possibly Newton (not part of Boston), as well. These aren't targets for redevelopment much at the moment, but I wanted to list them as they are less dense and places where the highway is generally lower than the surrounding neighborhoods. Newton already has two major building that are over the highway already (one of which is a very dated supermarket that could definitely stand to be replaced). There is a woefully underdeveloped neighborhood in Brighton next to I-90, right next to the New Balance HQ that is being redeveloped at the moment (as in, construction is actually underway). I do believe the development won't be completely replacing the under-utilized land south of the highway. The area's mostly auto body shops, car dealerships, and the like.

* Rose Kennedy Greenway (parkland over I-93 in Downtown Boston). This would be a political nightmare, but the city built a park over the main interstate through the city, 10 blocks long, and the park itself is underutilized. Taking over a few of those blocks (particularly the ones half taken up by onramps to the highway anyway) could be an option.

* Various parts of I-93 south of the South Bay Interchange. This is much more intermittent, but it is generally underdeveloped commercial/industrial land where the highway is often lower than the surrounding city.

Other areas for development in general:

* Seaport District. I think this has been covered earlier in the thread, but its mostly parking lots at the moment. It is slated for development at the moment, piecemeal.

* The industrial facilities northwest, southwest, and southeast of the South Bay Shopping Plaza (itself listed as an option in the map). Its almost entirely just warehouses, transit facilities, and the like. Speaking of the Shopping Plaza, its an open secret that Target (one of the main anchors of the Plaza) is going to be a tenant in one of the developments under construction near Fenway Park.

* On the same concept as the highway overfill ideas, there's lots of areas where the MBTA (the transit system) has below-grade tracks, particularly through much of the southern portions of the Red and Orange lines. Both go through economically depressed areas (Dorchester, Roxbury, parts of Quincy) and are often surrounded by obsolete shopping centers. Similar conditions apply to several of the commuter rail lines. Also, the Red Line ends in Braintree, where, while the town itself is doing well, my experience is that the commercial sector surrounding the terminal station seems to be doing poorly.

So, thats my somewhat stream-of-consciousness list of additional locations for development. As far as existing venues, I'd like to mention Matthews Arena for some of the smaller competitions. Its small, but the oldest indoor hockey arena and indoor multi-use arena still in use, in the world. But I'm an Alum of Northeastern, so I'm biased.

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