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This is BOSTON the most INNOVATIVE city in the world, this is literally the smallest of our worries, just ask any MIT student (even though this is old technology) and you will have a way to do it.

Sure, Boston may be innovative (not the most in the worls, though IMO), but that doesn't mean that they have the money to research and implement said innovation.

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Boston, Massachusetts is taking the first big steps towards looking into the feasibility of a Summer Games bid for the earliest year 2024. On Thursday, January 10, 2013, the MA State Senate file a Re

Oslo was an abortion - Boston is a miscarriage.

We prefer "Masshole" to "total douche".

Sure, Boston may be innovative (not the most in the worls, though IMO), but that doesn't mean that they have the money to research and implement said innovation.

Be sure to let the people who name the most innovative cities in the world that :-) it's been #1 (2009-2013) , #2 (2007-2008, 2014) and it's always in the top 10...

The students at our schools would do it for free if the rest of the committee would finally let people in the loop to help like they promised with the Logo design and then decided to great another BS one

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I bet if there were no safety concerns they could just design two stadiums one large and one small but make interchangeable parts so when you take most of the large one down you could use the same materials to build the smaller one in the same location... that would be pretty amazing

LOL.

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I wasn't thinking retractable. I was thinking that once a Games is over, the track could be removed and you could just fill in part of the infield with a dozen or sow rows of seats in order to configure it for soccer.

That would end up being the same thing as building a new stadium, though.

I have no proof or evidence, but I bet you are better off building a 100% temporary Olympic stadium, tearing it down, then building a soccer-specific stadium on the spot... than you are in building some sort of downsizable/transformable compromise. But nobody would ever propose such a thing as it sounds wasteful.

It's certainly true for houses.

I think Boston would be better off a stadium like Stade de France to be used by both the NFL and MLS teams in Boston. Seattle does that and they average double the attendance of the next highest MLS club.

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I think Boston would be better off a stadium like Stade de France to be used by both the NFL and MLS teams in Boston. Seattle does that and they average double the attendance of the next highest MLS club.

Gillette Stadium - owned and operated by Bob Kraft. So unless a hypothetical stadium in Boston is built to Kraft's liking (I'm sure he'd fund some of it) and he's given the keys to it after the Olympics, that's not going to fly. Considering how close the Patriots were to leaving the Boston area entirely before building the new stadium in Foxboro, it's a tough sell to think the Pats would move into Boston.

And in case you didn't realize it, the New England Revolution share Gillette with the Patriots (as they are both owned by Bob Kraft). They average 14,000 in attendance. So they would be much better served playing in a smaller stadium. The Sounders average the best attendance in the league because they have the strongest following, not simply because they play in a higher capacity stadium.

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Obviously it's not an Olympic Stadium but if you haven't seen it the New Atlanta Falcons Stadium that broke ground last month is pretty awesome... 71,000 Capacity Football field that has a pretty amazing roof that opens and closes like the aperture of a camera and it converts into a NCAA Basketball court with moveable seats. Same Architect as the Mets Stadium

http://newstadium.atlantafalcons.com/design-evolution/

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Gillette Stadium - owned and operated by Bob Kraft. So unless a hypothetical stadium in Boston is built to Kraft's liking (I'm sure he'd fund some of it) and he's given the keys to it after the Olympics, that's not going to fly. Considering how close the Patriots were to leaving the Boston area entirely before building the new stadium in Foxboro, it's a tough sell to think the Pats would move into Boston.

And in case you didn't realize it, the New England Revolution share Gillette with the Patriots (as they are both owned by Bob Kraft). They average 14,000 in attendance. So they would be much better served playing in a smaller stadium. The Sounders average the best attendance in the league because they have the strongest following, not simply because they play in a higher capacity stadium.

I think tickets after this world cup will really pick up?... in 1997 New England Rev had the #1 MLS Attendance with 22,000... but it would still be more conducive in the city. There are definitely no plans to move the Patriots here.

We also have to remember that a couple of these places are sites being considered for the Casinos no?

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Be sure to let the people who name the most innovative cities in the world that :-) it's been #1 (2009-2013) , #2 (2007-2008, 2014) and it's always in the top 10...

The students at our schools would do it for free if the rest of the committee would finally let people in the loop to help like they promised with the Logo design and then decided to great another BS one

Who does name the most innovative cities in the world? Seems like another one of those lists we've been discussing elsewhere that provide a little useful information, but don't exactly mean much in the grand scheme of Olympic bidding.

And sure, there are a lot of smart kids in Boston. Would like to think it would be someone more than college students trying to develop an Olympic plan, but here's the thing.. let's say the folks in Boston come up with a great plan for Boston to host the Olympics. Can you sell that to local businesses and politicians and get them on board? That new Falcons stadium you referenced has a price tag of $1.2 billion. It's one thing to have a plan. Like woohoo said though, it's another thing entirely to implement a plan like that and to fund it.

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I think tickets after this world cup will really pick up?... in 1997 New England Rev had the #1 MLS Attendance with 22,000... but it would still be more conducive in the city. There are definitely no plans to move the Patriots here.

We also have to remember that a couple of these places are sites being considered for the Casinos no?

You're going to cite attendance figures from 17 years ago? Do you understand why some of us think you're making less than compelling arguments in support of Boston?

I've had this discussion elsewhere about soccer.. Americans are into the World Cup more than they are into the sport itself. So I doubt we'll see much of an uptick in ticket sales for MLS. Even still, the Revs ranked 16 out of 19 franchises in attendance last year. Yes, they would benefit greatly from a soccer specific stadium. Could that happen in some form related to an Olympics? Sure. And perhaps Boston proper (or at least something closer to the city than Foxboro) could use such a stadium. The problem with urban planning initiatives involving the Olympics though is that you have to think long term. At some point within the next year, Boston needs to offer up a plan for how they would present a 2024 Olympics knowing the the decision on the host city isn't made until 2017. If someone else were to come up with a plan, say, for a soccer stadium that could be built and filled immediately, how does that mesh with an Olympic bid? It's an issue we've heard a lot about in New York. I won't claim to know anything about sites being considered for casinos, but again, that's what the city needs to weigh.. do we hand that land over to casino developers or do they hold it back for sports and/or Olympic-related construction. Again, that's where all this planning needs to be forward thinking. To come up with an Olympic plan, you can't do that first and figure all these other details out later on.

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Who does name the most innovative cities in the world? Seems like another one of those lists we've been discussing elsewhere that provide a little useful information, but don't exactly mean much in the grand scheme of Olympic bidding.

And sure, there are a lot of smart kids in Boston. Would like to think it would be someone more than college students trying to develop an Olympic plan, but here's the thing.. let's say the folks in Boston come up with a great plan for Boston to host the Olympics. Can you sell that to local businesses and politicians and get them on board? That new Falcons stadium you referenced has a price tag of $1.2 billion. It's one thing to have a plan. Like woohoo said though, it's another thing entirely to implement a plan like that and to fund it.

The company is called 2thinknow... the statistics are used my all city governments in the world that are researched and by global media like Forbes, Business World, Fast Company, Reuters, The Boston Globe, NY Times, Huff Post, Entrepreneur etc. etc. etc. And they use over 162 different city indicators like GDP and every other possible city performance from Architecture to Arts to Business to Advertising Etc....

And I did not mean the would be working on the Olympic Plan I meant they have some pretty amazing ideas and designs that could be used to help do something that has yet to be done. I was just telling people to check out the stadium because its cool! And we really cant say that Mr. Kraft wont pay for it outright at least the portion that would be his in the end. The companies taking over the London Stadium are paying for 60+ percent of the retrofitting currently

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You're going to cite attendance figures from 17 years ago? Do you understand why some of us think you're making less than compelling arguments in support of Boston?

I've had this discussion elsewhere about soccer.. Americans are into the World Cup more than they are into the sport itself. So I doubt we'll see much of an uptick in ticket sales for MLS. Even still, the Revs ranked 16 out of 19 franchises in attendance last year. Yes, they would benefit greatly from a soccer specific stadium. Could that happen in some form related to an Olympics? Sure. And perhaps Boston proper (or at least something closer to the city than Foxboro) could use such a stadium. The problem with urban planning initiatives involving the Olympics though is that you have to think long term. At some point within the next year, Boston needs to offer up a plan for how they would present a 2024 Olympics knowing the the decision on the host city isn't made until 2017. If someone else were to come up with a plan, say, for a soccer stadium that could be built and filled immediately, how does that mesh with an Olympic bid? It's an issue we've heard a lot about in New York. I won't claim to know anything about sites being considered for casinos, but again, that's what the city needs to weigh.. do we hand that land over to casino developers or do they hold it back for sports and/or Olympic-related construction. Again, that's where all this planning needs to be forward thinking. To come up with an Olympic plan, you can't do that first and figure all these other details out later on.

Correct - absolutely.

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You're going to cite attendance figures from 17 years ago? Do you understand why some of us think you're making less than compelling arguments in support of Boston?

I've had this discussion elsewhere about soccer.. Americans are into the World Cup more than they are into the sport itself. So I doubt we'll see much of an uptick in ticket sales for MLS. Even still, the Revs ranked 16 out of 19 franchises in attendance last year. Yes, they would benefit greatly from a soccer specific stadium. Could that happen in some form related to an Olympics? Sure. And perhaps Boston proper (or at least something closer to the city than Foxboro) could use such a stadium. The problem with urban planning initiatives involving the Olympics though is that you have to think long term. At some point within the next year, Boston needs to offer up a plan for how they would present a 2024 Olympics knowing the the decision on the host city isn't made until 2017. If someone else were to come up with a plan, say, for a soccer stadium that could be built and filled immediately, how does that mesh with an Olympic bid? It's an issue we've heard a lot about in New York. I won't claim to know anything about sites being considered for casinos, but again, that's what the city needs to weigh.. do we hand that land over to casino developers or do they hold it back for sports and/or Olympic-related construction. Again, that's where all this planning needs to be forward thinking. To come up with an Olympic plan, you can't do that first and figure all these other details out later on.

god you are ridiculous stop tearing everything apart seriously... I was simply stating that there is certainly room for GROWTH! Especially since this is the most viewed World Cup of all time...

I'm just going to respond to posts like I did about the stadium and not respond to you breaking down each syllable because it's stupid and call me some more names call me a child and yet I have never come at you or miss quoted you

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The company is called 2thinknow... the statistics are used my all city governments in the world that are researched and by global media like Forbes, Business World, Fast Company, Reuters, The Boston Globe, NY Times, Huff Post, Entrepreneur etc. etc. etc. And they use over 162 different city indicators like GDP and every other possible city performance from Architecture to Arts to Business to Advertising Etc....

And I did not mean the would be working on the Olympic Plan I meant they have some pretty amazing ideas and designs that could be used to help do something that has yet to be done. I was just telling people to check out the stadium because its cool! And we really cant say that Mr. Kraft wont pay for it outright at least the portion that would be his in the end. The companies taking over the London Stadium are paying for 60+ percent of the retrofitting currently

Regardless of where Boston ranks in terms of academics and innovation, that does not directly correlate to an Olympic bid. I wish it did as it would help Boston's efforts, but - and I say this as someone who would love Boston to pull together a winning bid - Boston's reputation as being an innovation center does nothing to solve issues around site identification, development, financing, and getting the political will to get it done.

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god you are ridiculous stop tearing everything apart seriously... I was simply stating that there is certainly room for GROWTH! Especially since this is the most viewed World Cup of all time...

If you don't want it torn apart then stop leaving holes in your arguments.

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Regardless of where Boston ranks in terms of academics and innovation, that does not directly correlate to an Olympic bid. I wish it did as it would help Boston's efforts, but - and I say this as someone who would love Boston to pull together a winning bid - Boston's reputation as being an innovation center does nothing to solve issues around site identification, development, financing, and getting the political will to get it done.

Obviously but He said Boston had never won most innovative so I was making it clear that they had... and it does have to do with building a stadium that could fit in a location and be reduced in size for after that is in itself innovation.

And nothing has been left with holes.. he takes a statement and says oh that was 17 years ago... NO ****! I was stating that if we had more than double the attendance in 1997 we could build it back to that number now that soccer is even more popular especially with a more local stadium. I wasnt saying oh we were #1 before so we should be now just that we havent always been so low

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Be sure to let the people who name the most innovative cities in the world that :-) it's been #1 (2009-2013) , #2 (2007-2008, 2014) and it's always in the top 10...

The students at our schools would do it for free if the rest of the committee would finally let people in the loop to help like they promised with the Logo design and then decided to great another BS one

Well, design and research is out of the window. What about construction and implementation? I'm pretty sure you do not represent your entire school's student's opinions by saying that they don't mind breaking their back and bone researching, testing, and designing hundreds of hours into developing an innovate way to save money on adjusting seat positioning.

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Well, design and research is out of the window. What about construction and implementation? I'm pretty sure you do not represent your entire school's student's opinions by saying that they don't mind breaking their back and bone researching, testing, and designing hundreds of hours into developing an innovate way to save money on adjusting seat positioning.

LOL that's how you get credits for big projects at school a lot more fun when you are planning for something that may actually be built! Thats how that first Boston Logo was designed dont you know LOL

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Gillette Stadium - owned and operated by Bob Kraft. So unless a hypothetical stadium in Boston is built to Kraft's liking (I'm sure he'd fund some of it) and he's given the keys to it after the Olympics, that's not going to fly. Considering how close the Patriots were to leaving the Boston area entirely before building the new stadium in Foxboro, it's a tough sell to think the Pats would move into Boston.

The old stadium was also in Foxboro. Kraft owns both teams and has stated he wants a downtown stadium in Boston. The problem is land and a contribution from the city. If the city can use eminent domain to grab the land and then pays for the stadium for the sake of hosting the Olympics I'm pretty positive he'd be OK with it. As long as it was either reconstructed for football or had retractable stands, anyway.

And in case you didn't realize it, the New England Revolution share Gillette with the Patriots (as they are both owned by Bob Kraft). They average 14,000 in attendance. So they would be much better served playing in a smaller stadium. The Sounders average the best attendance in the league because they have the strongest following, not simply because they play in a higher capacity stadium.

The Sounders have the highest attendance because they play in a downtown stadium in a walkable city full of hipsters. Boston is also walkable and full of hipsters, but the stadium is way out in the suburbs with little mass transit access. A downtown stadium would be great for the Revolution and Patriots.

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Obviously but He said Boston had never won most innovative so I was making it clear that they had... and it does have to do with building a stadium that could fit in a location and be reduced in size for after that is in itself innovation.

And nothing has been left with holes.. he takes a statement and says oh that was 17 years ago... NO ****! I was stating that if we had more than double the attendance in 1997 we could build it back to that number now that soccer is even more popular especially with a more local stadium. I wasnt saying oh we were #1 before so we should be now just that we havent always been so low

Innovation ranking can be a matter of opinion and does not always have to be in an official list. I am not doubting Boston's capabilities (in innovation), I am just pointing out that new things cannot rely on just mind-power. Old information cannot always be reliable as things and statistics change over time. And in comparison, SF/LA/DC all are also considered "innovative" according to 2thinknow (as both cities have index scores over 50 and are in the top 50 [sF is in top 10, LA in top 15, DC in top 25/50]), which is 2 years old...

IF innovation ranking directly effects the chances of an Olympic bid's chances, you still can't mark down the other possible USOC candidate cities as they also rank in high a (somewhat*) high position.

* - Depending on city

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Another thing to note: all the (known) possible main stadium locations both have extra pricetags in them (Cabot & eminent domain, Beacon & highway rerouting)

LOL that's how you get credits for big projects at school a lot more fun when you are planning for something that may actually be built! Thats how that first Boston Logo was designed dont you know LOL

Unfortunately, successful research cannot always simply take a mere 4-6 years to complete and perfect (and that doesn't even count the construction time [especially in the US *shiver*]). From here till the election date (assuming Boston is selected by the USOC and makes it through the IOC process) of the 2024 Olympic city is about 3 years. Plus the amount of 7 years given (assuming Boston is selected) will be 10 years. 10 different generations of different students will be working on this? How well will that work out (would it be good risky or bad risky?)? Plus, the 3 years would be questionable as the success of Boston 2024 is not definite, leaving only 7 years to design, develop, test, build, and implement...

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Innovation ranking can be a matter of opinion and does not always have to be in an official list. I am not doubting Boston's capabilities (in innovation), I am just pointing out that new things cannot rely on just mind-power. Old information cannot always be reliable as things and statistics change over time. And in comparison, SF/LA/DC all are also considered "innovative" according to 2thinknow (as both cities have index scores over 50 and are in the top 50 [sF is in top 10, LA in top 15, DC in top 25/50]), which is 2 years old...

IF innovation ranking directly effects the chances of an Olympic bid's chances, you still can't mark down the other possible USOC candidate cities as they also rank in high a (somewhat*) high position.

* - Depending on city

*I am not doubting Boston's capabilities in anyway (in terms of planning, organization, and innovation)

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god you are ridiculous stop tearing everything apart seriously... I was simply stating that there is certainly room for GROWTH! Especially since this is the most viewed World Cup of all time...

I'm just going to respond to posts like I did about the stadium and not respond to you breaking down each syllable because it's stupid and call me some more names call me a child and yet I have never come at you or miss quoted you

Obviously but He said Boston had never won most innovative so I was making it clear that they had... and it does have to do with building a stadium that could fit in a location and be reduced in size for after that is in itself innovation.

And nothing has been left with holes.. he takes a statement and says oh that was 17 years ago... NO ****! I was stating that if we had more than double the attendance in 1997 we could build it back to that number now that soccer is even more popular especially with a more local stadium. I wasnt saying oh we were #1 before so we should be now just that we havent always been so low

I'm trying not to make this about your history of bad arguments here, but you do have a pretty poor track record in that department and very little has changed. If you don't want to be torn apart, make a better point. Yes, 17 years ago, the Revs drew 22,000 people per game. Hardly a case for growth to point out that a product was popular a number of years ago and hasn't even come close to that level since. If you're trying to point out what their attendance could be in the near future though, wouldn't it make more sense to look at recent years and trends and not look so far into their past. So for reference, here is the Revolution attendance, year by year.. Average attendance

This season they're averaging over 15,000 fans per game. So yes, there is an upswing you can point to. That's the argument for growth. Not what they did back when MLS was first created and was a new product and a novelty.

Again, you have this habit of making arguments out of "well, this could happen, all you have to do is imagine it." That's all well and good, but tell us how that's going to happen. Don't tell us that just because it's possible, we should imagine the scenario where it happens. You can't skip the middleman of that timeline.

Well, design and research is out of the window. What about construction and implementation? I'm pretty sure you do not represent your entire school's student's opinions by saying that they don't mind breaking their back and bone researching, testing, and designing hundreds of hours into developing an innovate way to save money on adjusting seat positioning.

Bingo. There's 2 elements to this for Boston or any other prospective host city, just like with many endeavors.. you have to come up with a plan and then you have to execute it. Presumably it's no longer going to cost tens of millions of dollars to bid, but even an innovative city full of smart students like Boston is going to have difficulty coming up with an Olympic plan in a city that may or may not be well-suited to host an Olympics. Again, ask New York how that worked out for them.

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Kraft owns the Pats, Gillette and the land around it. He is making a fortune developing that land. Zero chance he moves the Pats.

Yes, several of the sites are possibilities for a casino, especially Suffolk Downs.

To be honest I hadn't thought about that. Mea culpa.

That being the case, I have to wonder why he wants a new stadium for the Revolution if his real interest is in getting people to the ancillary shops he owns in Foxboro.

Maybe Boston would be better off with a temporary stadium they could simply tear down after the games.

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Look at Manchester's CWG stadium if you don't want the track afterwards and want a football stadium to remain, look at London's initial plans (c.2008) if you want a downsized athletics stadium after the Games, look at Tokyo or Paris if you want a full-fat retractable solution. As for the final option - downsizable AND retractable seating -, i'm not sure it's been done. That's not to say it's impossible, but I'd imagine it's not cheap.

I wasn't thinking retractable. I was thinking that once a Games is over, the track could be removed and you could just fill in part of the infield with a dozen or sow rows of seats in order to configure it for soccer.

In that case Madrid or Hampden could be used as models, though the latter has a huge oval field anyway which isn't particularly ideal for football so perhaps it's best not to use the Glasgow stadium as your blueprint.

Madrid proposed a stadium which had a filled infield and a running track covering the lower tier. This could be workable.

The trouble with this, though, is that it INCREASES the capacity of the stadium by 20k after the Games, precicely the opposite of what Boston seems to want to do.

I suppose you could have a mixture of temporary stands above ground in combination with a filled infield. So 20k seats hidden during Games-time, 40k temporary ones above ground which come down after the Games to be replaced by 10k new permanant seats. So basically rebuilding everything except for the lower tier which would proabably be sunk into the ground.

Tha's the best solution I can think of. I find it difficult to envisage a completely elegant and cost-effective solution that allows for significant downsizing and moving to a stadium ideal for football after the Games. Doable, but not easy,

This is probably the one venue where Boston needs to think radically and allow itself an opt-out from its cheaper, more conservative venue concept. A hard-sell, but perhaps easier if there is to be significant funding from the owner of Boston's MLS club.

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