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Boston, Massachusetts is taking the first big steps towards looking into the feasibility of a Summer Games bid for the earliest year 2024.

On Thursday, January 10, 2013, the MA State Senate file a Resolve to establish a commission to study the feasibility of hosting the Summer Olympics. The study shall include but not be limited to, the prospects of working with other New England states and should seek input from local government and organizations, especially in our larger cities and other organizations and agencies. The commission shall review all aspects of a prospective Summer Olympics in Boston and the surrounding area, including, but not limited to, infrastructure, transportation, lodging, locations for events, costs, benefits, and any other factors the commission deems relevant.

Aside from work behind the scenes in the MA Legislature, an outside committee consisting of currently 8-10 individuals are meeting regularly to for the Boston Olympic Exploratory Committee. This team is a diverse group of public citizens from the City of Boston working to gain support and work with individuals who worked on former Boston Olympic Bid efforts and other major sporting & special events in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Check out the latest news at our future site home:

http://www.boston-2024.org

Follow our tweets

' class="bbc_url">@Boston_2024

"Like" us on Facebook @ http://www.facebook.com/boston2024

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Welcome, but Boston's not gonna happen. Way too small. And Foxboro is too far out. Boston could be good for YOG...but not for the full-blown adult SOGs.

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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Welcome, but Boston's not gonna happen. Way too small. And Foxboro is too far out. Boston could be good for YOG...but not for the full-blown adult SOGs.

What does Foxboro have to do with a Boston bid?

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Well, at the very least it does show that there are potential US applicants for '24 weighing their options and preparing the groundwork.

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Now this looks like to be "buzz". And unlike the Dallas front, there is actually state government that's going to be involved in this case. This is the most substantial thing out there, thus far, that we've seen among any of the U.S. cities.

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^Like Cowboys in Arlington, it could be used as a football venue, but not as the main stadium. I would think that these people that are going to be on this Exploratory Committee realize this.

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well, that's where a possible, converted Olympic stadium sits.

Well then again the Patriots wouldn;t probably allow it. (Not sure of the ownership) A new stadium is an almost must.

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Boston, Massachusetts is taking the first big steps towards looking into the feasibility of a Summer Games bid for the earliest year 2024.

On Thursday, January 10, 2013, the MA State Senate file a Resolve to establish a commission to study the feasibility of hosting the Summer Olympics. The study shall include but not be limited to, the prospects of working with other New England states and should seek input from local government and organizations, especially in our larger cities and other organizations and agencies. The commission shall review all aspects of a prospective Summer Olympics in Boston and the surrounding area, including, but not limited to, infrastructure, transportation, lodging, locations for events, costs, benefits, and any other factors the commission deems relevant.

Aside from work behind the scenes in the MA Legislature, an outside committee consisting of currently 8-10 individuals are meeting regularly to for the Boston Olympic Exploratory Committee. This team is a diverse group of public citizens from the City of Boston working to gain support and work with individuals who worked on former Boston Olympic Bid efforts and other major sporting & special events in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Check out the latest news at our future site home:

http://www.boston-2024.org

Follow our tweets

' class="bbc_url">@Boston_2024

"Like" us on Facebook @ http://www.facebook.com/boston2024

At the risk of sounding a little skeptical here.. a new poster comes in with the name Boston2024 and posts something I'm not seeing anywhere else online. Not that I'm necessarily doubting you, but it would be reassuring to see someone not directly tied with the bid (and clearly you are since it's "our future site") make mention of this somewhere other than this website or in self-created social media. And I will respectfully disagree with FYI that the mention of state government involvement suddenly makes this the most substantial thing out there.

Well then again the Patriots wouldn;t probably allow it. (Not sure of the ownership) A new stadium is an almost must.

Gillette Stadium - owned by Robert Kraft. Used during the summer by the New England Revolution, also owned by Robert Kraft. Lots of development in the immediate area. Would serve as no more than a football venue for an Olympics. Unlikely to be replaced again in the same location

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Well, if it's not legit, then no. But if it is, then why wouldn't it be substantial? It takes local government to finally give the 'ok' on a bid.

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I agree Boston is way too small, but they do have Harvard Stadium which could be used as the olympic stadium. Harvard is planning to renovate the stadium and also add a new basketball arena. I'm not saying I'm for a Boston bid, but they could have some options.

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I don't know if Boston is viable host. But they are at last as viable as San Fran, which many people here think is viable.

Both SanFran and Boston have there positives and negatives, but one problem lies within their potential bid, and most American cities bid. Do they have a legacy plan? What will become of the stadiums and arenas once the games are over. Will they be put to use? Or will they be demolished?

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The commission set up by the MA State House, should they approve the bill to establish a commission, will study all of the positives and negatives surrounding a Boston & New England Regional Bid. Boston's scale and natural beauty would play well to hosting an event of this magnitude. The city encompasses the history of a nation. It has been an intellectual beacon to the world, and represents must of the best of what America has stood for and accomplished. What could be more appropriate than to have the best athletes of the world compete on such a place.

Boston has a long tradition of hosting some of the most important, and well-attended, sporting, and cultural events in the world. Below are just a few comparable examples

  • Sail Boston 1992 — 7-8 million visitors in metro Boston over 6 days
  • Boston Marathon — est 36,000 runners, 500K spectators, 1,000 media members annually
  • Head of the Charles Regatta — 9,000 athletes, 300K spectators annually
  • Democratic National Convention 2004 — 35,000 delegates, media and staff
  • First Night Boston — est 1.5 million visitors on NYE annually

Nevertheless, hosting the Olympics would present an enormous challenge, and the objective in setting up a commission by local government and the Boston Olympic Exploratory Committee is to determine whether Boston has the will, resources and venues necessary to successfully meet this challenge.

Our team is looking forward to sharing more information as we move through the year. Continue checking in on our social media channels & website.

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Boston is not viable.

Look at a map of the bloody city, there is no land. This isn't China were you can bulldoze some Southey's homes to build an Olympic Park. And if by miracle land was found for the main stadium (which cannot be foxboro) where is everything else. The events would be spread out all over the city and surrounding cities. It would be enough to send anyone responsible for the logistics to the looney bin. I cannot impress on anyone here how unbelievably not viable Boston is. Boston is considerably worse off compared to NYC with regards to land and is probably the only major American city that has no hope of landing the Olympics ever. Philadelphia is better suited to the games.

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The commission set up by the MA State House, should they approve the bill to establish a commission, will study all of the positives and negatives surrounding a Boston & New England Regional Bid. Boston's scale and natural beauty would play well to hosting an event of this magnitude. The city encompasses the history of a nation. It has been an intellectual beacon to the world, and represents must of the best of what America has stood for and accomplished. What could be more appropriate than to have the best athletes of the world compete on such a place.

Boston has a long tradition of hosting some of the most important, and well-attended, sporting, and cultural events in the world. Below are just a few comparable examples

  • Sail Boston 1992 — 7-8 million visitors in metro Boston over 6 days
  • Boston Marathon — est 36,000 runners, 500K spectators, 1,000 media members annually
  • Head of the Charles Regatta — 9,000 athletes, 300K spectators annually
  • Democratic National Convention 2004 — 35,000 delegates, media and staff
  • First Night Boston — est 1.5 million visitors on NYE annually

Nevertheless, hosting the Olympics would present an enormous challenge, and the objective in setting up a commission by local government and the Boston Olympic Exploratory Committee is to determine whether Boston has the will, resources and venues necessary to successfully meet this challenge.

Our team is looking forward to sharing more information as we move through the year. Continue checking in on our social media channels & website.

There is no doubt about Boston's sports organizational experience. But Boston just does not have the size and critical mass of a Beijing, a London, a Rio, a Moscow, a Paris, a Tokyo or Istanbul (yeah, very crowded). The city is just too small and crowded. Not happening.

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Boston is not viable.

Look at a map of the bloody city, there is no land. This isn't China were you can bulldoze some Southey's homes to build an Olympic Park. And if by miracle land was found for the main stadium (which cannot be foxboro) where is everything else. The events would be spread out all over the city and surrounding cities. It would be enough to send anyone responsible for the logistics to the looney bin. I cannot impress on anyone here how unbelievably not viable Boston is.

How well do you know Boston??? There is significant reclaimable space in South Boston.. that's where Bob Kraft wanted to build a stadium for the Patriots before Gov Weld stepped in and scuttled the plans. Yes, Boston would have venues all over town...just as Beijing, London, Rio, etc. had / will have venues all over town. One difference is that Boston is much more compact than those place.

There are problems with Boston has a host city. But venues and transportation would b a strong points. Also, given Boston's huge college sporting activity... and it being one of the only big cities in the US without a stadium, it probably has bigger legacy opportunity than any other US city.

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How well do you know Boston??? There is significant reclaimable space in South Boston.. that's where Bob Kraft wanted to build a stadium for the Patriots before Gov Weld stepped in and scuttled the plans. Yes, Boston would have venues all over town...just as Beijing, London, Rio, etc. had / will have venues all over town. One difference is that Boston is much more compact than those place.

There are problems with Boston has a host city. But venues and transportation would b a strong points. Also, given Boston's huge college sporting activity... and it being one of the only big cities in the US without a stadium, it probably has bigger legacy opportunity than any other US city.

Back in 1994 when Boston attempted to bid for the 2008 Summer Games, Harvard University and Boston University worked alongside the Boston Organizing Committee to use college dorms which are vacant throughout the summer as the athlete villages. That's a lot of real estate Boston has and won't need to build. In 2024, Gillette Stadium will be 22 years old and will be well due for a makeover. That's making a lot of assumptions that Foxboro would be a focal point of a Boston Olympics but there is a direct commuter rail from South Station in downtown Boston to Gillette Stadium & Patriots Place.

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Back in 1994 when Boston attempted to bid for the 2008 Summer Games, Harvard University and Boston University worked alongside the Boston Organizing Committee to use college dorms which are vacant throughout the summer as the athlete villages. That's a lot of real estate Boston has and won't need to build. In 2024, Gillette Stadium will be 22 years old and will be well due for a makeover. That's making a lot of assumptions that Foxboro would be a focal point of a Boston Olympics but there is a direct commuter rail from South Station in downtown Boston to Gillette Stadium & Patriots Place.

But see that's going to be problematic. Foxboro is a separate jurisdiction from the city of Boston, right? It didn't work for the San Francisco 2012 bid when the main Olympic Stadium was going to be the one of Stanford down in Palo Alto. So therefore, it should be Foxboro 2024...and NOT Boston 2024. Seemingly minor detail but the IOC gets picky about that. And having the Villages in Boston and then the main Oly stadium...what? 37 mins by Google...is not going to sit well with the Olympic/IAAF fathers. Of all the venues, they want the main Oly stadium and the OVs at most 15-20 mins away from each other.

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There are problems with Boston has a host city. But venues and transportation would b a strong points. Also, given Boston's huge college sporting activity... and it being one of the only big cities in the US without a stadium, it probably has bigger legacy opportunity than any other US city.

The thing about Boston.. it's a good college town. It's a good sports team. But it's not really a great college sports town. Transportation is absolutely a strong point in their favor, but like most cities we discuss, the stadium issue is a problem for them and yes there's a legacy opportunity, but I don't know how they get that to work for both the city and for the Olympics. Let alone the issues of location which hamper Boston as much if not more than other cities.

Back in 1994 when Boston attempted to bid for the 2008 Summer Games, Harvard University and Boston University worked alongside the Boston Organizing Committee to use college dorms which are vacant throughout the summer as the athlete villages. That's a lot of real estate Boston has and won't need to build. In 2024, Gillette Stadium will be 22 years old and will be well due for a makeover. That's making a lot of assumptions that Foxboro would be a focal point of a Boston Olympics but there is a direct commuter rail from South Station in downtown Boston to Gillette Stadium & Patriots Place.

Ahh lovely, yet another first time poster with a boston_2024 name. Sure, that's not fishy at all.

I said it before, I'll say it again.. Gillette Stadium will be no more than a football venue in a Boston 2024 plan. The stadium is owned by Robert Kraft. He paid for 100% of the costs of the stadium. So unless he's going to get something out of this deal, he's not about to hand over his building, let alone for the type of full-scale makeover that would make it the focal point of an Olympic bid. And that's above and beyond what baron brought up, that it's too far from downtown Boston to be an integral part of the bid.

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Having venus outside of metropolital Boston is a non-issue. Every city that has hosted an Olympic Games has had events & venues well beyond the city limits. If two venues are in Foxboro, Cambridge, South Boston, Hyde Park and sailing in Newport, RI... it would still be Boston 2024. The entire New England region is still smaller than the distance Beijing had between their venu clusters.

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But see that's going to be problematic. Foxboro is a separate jurisdiction from the city of Boston, right? It didn't work for the San Francisco 2012 bid when the main Olympic Stadium was going to be the one of Stanford down in Palo Alto. So therefore, it should be Foxboro 2024...and NOT Boston 2024. Seemingly minor detail but the IOC gets picky about that. And having the Villages in Boston and then the main Oly stadium...what? 37 mins by Google...is not going to sit well with the Olympic/IAAF fathers. Of all the venues, they want the main Oly stadium and the OVs at most 15-20 mins away from each other.

Nobody things Gillette is going to be the main stadium for a Boston SOC. Nobdody! It'll host football, maybe rugby. It's won't be a problem *at all*.

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Having venus outside of metropolital Boston is a non-issue. Every city that has hosted an Olympic Games has had events & venues well beyond the city limits. If two venues are in Foxboro, Cambridge, South Boston, Hyde Park and sailing in Newport, RI... it would still be Boston 2024. The entire New England region is still smaller than the distance Beijing had between their venu clusters.

If u say so. Just saying that the IOC considers the T&F venue, the Olympic stadium, ground zero for their concept of an ideal Olympic bid. If the Village sits outside the host city's borders, no biggie on that but it MUST BE within 15-20 mins of the T&F stadium. The 3rd part of that triad is the IOC hotel. If you situate these 3 elements strategically w/in easy spitting distance of each other, then your bid is that far ahead technically, and it doesn't matter too much where all the other (secondary) venues fall into place. Of course there have been exceptions...but usually there is some sort of geo-political or IOC-sentimental layer that overrides any deficiencies in the above scenario. And remember, Boston is not quite an "Alpha" city stacked up against Paris, Berlin or even Durban where the IOC is just waiting for the RSA to hang out their shingle saying "Open for Business."

Also, you have to be sure it ISN'T too compact. Look at the crowds that went to London's Olympic park...and that was already a monitored crowd since only those with event tickets could get into the competition enclosures. Because of safety reasons, the IOC also does not want too many venues rubbing shoulders with each other not unless it's in an environment that they can strictly control. (With its nuclear reactor, I already see the Harvard and Boston U campuses as being very challenging to turn into secure Villages; doable but tricky and considering that a few of the arenas and gyms w/in the 2 campuses will also be used as competition venues...ups the security considerations.)

Boston/New England would be a great setting but with the size that the 21st century Summer Olympics have become, I just fear that the downtown core of Boston would be too small. (I think Philly's spread of its college campuses works better, logistically, for an Olympics than Boston.)

Edited by baron-pierreIV

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Having venus outside of metropolital Boston is a non-issue. Every city that has hosted an Olympic Games has had events & venues well beyond the city limits. If two venues are in Foxboro, Cambridge, South Boston, Hyde Park and sailing in Newport, RI... it would still be Boston 2024. The entire New England region is still smaller than the distance Beijing had between their venu clusters.

Are you not reading what anyone is saying here? The MAIN Olympic stadium, the CENTERPIECE of any Olympic bid/host city can't be that FAR away from the host city. No previous Olympic host city has ever had the MAIN stadium that far-flung from the host city.

So Foxboro CAN'T be the MAIN Olympic stadium.

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Boston is small compared to other American cities, so they will need to set most of the venues in the Metro area.

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