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PyeongChang 2018 Venues

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Thanks for the image. But still not very precise. I would say I can locate the venues within a 500 m - 1 km radius.

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Here is a far shot view of the site of the Opening Ceremony, where a temporary 50,000 seat stadium will be built.

http://cfile227.uf.daum.net/image/2229BB4C527F825E0131D7

So where on that picture are they planning on building a stadium? In between the buildings?

The location overall looks too small for an Olympics. Are there really enough hotels? I believe the hotel in the pictures above for the Alpensia resort is actually the main hotel. The decision to move the main hockey stadium out of the original cluster of ice sports seems at face value a mess.

The general impression I get in they are nowhere near ready enough.

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Third Winter Olympics in a row with Sea and Mountains.

Could we just go to mountains next time?

Oh wait, Oslo is at the sea too. :lol:

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The location overall looks too small for an Olympics. Are there really enough hotels? I believe the hotel in the pictures above for the Alpensia resort is actually the main hotel.

I guess with only 50 min to Seoul many will stay there instead of Alpensia or Yungbong.

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I guess with only 50 min to Seoul many will stay there instead of Alpensia or Yungbong.

That's possible for locals but for international games fans travelling to Seoul isn't a good idea. To experience a games and attend a few events you really need to be stating close by.

I don't know the area but from the look of the maps it looks like the least accommodation options in recent history. Less than Vancouver or Turin.

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So let me get this straight, The Olympic Park of Hoenggye will be outside PyeongChang? Or not? If yes, then that's against the Olympic Charter rules. The Opening and Closing Ceremonies have to be in the Host City, which is PyeongChang.

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So let me get this straight, The Olympic Park of Hoenggye will be outside PyeongChang? Or not? If yes, then that's against the Olympic Charter rules. The Opening and Closing Ceremonies have to be in the Host City, which is PyeongChang.

PyeongChang isn't even a city.... it's a county. The county seat - Pyeongchang-eup - is a city. But none of the events will be held there.

That big about the opening and closing ceremonies having to be in the host city? Totally meaningless.

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Technically, the opening ceremony of Athens 2004 didn't take place in Athens either, but in the city of Marousi which is part of the Athens agglomeration. And I'm sure there are other examples for that in Olympic history. And frankly, I've never heard of that alleged rule in the Olympic Charter.

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Technically, the opening ceremony of Athens 2004 didn't take place in Athens either, but in the city of Marousi which is part of the Athens agglomeration. And I'm sure there are other examples for that in Olympic history. And frankly, I've never heard of that alleged rule in the Olympic Charter.

Olympic Charter, Page 71, Rule 34, Point 1 - http://www.olympic.org/Documents/olympic_charter_en.pdf

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Olympic Charter, Page 71, Rule 34, Point 1 - http://www.olympic.org/Documents/olympic_charter_en.pdf

Yeah, but you shouldn't take the term "host city" verbatim. The term usually refers to a whole agglomeration hosting the Games and containing the main stadium. That was the case also in Sydney: The agglomeration is called Sydney, but the actual City of Sydney is only one small portion of the agglomeration, and it doesn't even contain Sydney's Olympic Park. But the agglomeration does.

And as Zeke already pointed out, Pyeongchang is not only the name of a town, but also of a whole county. So it's in compliance with the rules of the Olympic Charter. If it wasn't, the whole concept of the Pyeongchang Games would have never been accepted by the IOC anyway.

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Yeah, but you shouldn't take the term "host city" verbatim. The term usually refers to a whole agglomeration hosting the Games and containing the main stadium. That was the case also in Sydney: The agglomeration is called Sydney, but the actual City of Sydney is only one small portion of the agglomeration, and it doesn't even contain Sydney's Olympic Park. But the agglomeration does.

And as Zeke already pointed out, Pyeongchang is not only the name of a town, but also of a whole county. So it's in compliance with the rules of the Olympic Charter. If it wasn't, the whole concept of the Pyeongchang Games would have never been accepted by the IOC anyway.

Fair enough, thanks and that's made it clear now. So now we have cleared that up, when will the construction start on the PyeongChang 2018 Venues?

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Tony, would you care to check the PyeongChang 2018 website, Wikipedia or the other posts in this thread for further info on that? This is once again that kind of unnecessary question to which you can look up the answer easily on the internet (and even in this thread). Thank you.

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But Sydney & Athens were close by and not-important enough to the bigger aggregation of the major, "lead" city to be accepted as part of that. I don't think it would work if say, the main stadium were in Fort Worth or St. Paul...and then pass off the bid as Dallas and Minneapolis bids when 2 of the main components were in their own, self-standing cities. Plus, they had metro lines emanating from the center of the "lead" city to those suburbs--so in a way, the Sydney & Athens locations were "convenient" extensions of the named host city.

As for PC, they had to anchor the whole bid under one name or town, and it just happened to be PC. And circumstances have dictated that they change the main venue of the OC/stadium to a place other than within PC borders.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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But Sydney & Athens were close by and not-important enough to the bigger aggregation of the major, "lead" city to be accepted as part of that. I don't think it would work if say, the main stadium were in Fort Worth or St. Paul...and then pass off the bid as Dallas and Minneapolis bids when 2 of the main components were in their own, self-standing cities. Plus, they had metro lines emanating from the center of the "lead" city to those suburbs--so in a way, the Sydney & Athens locations were "convenient" extensions of the named host city.

As for PC, they had to anchor the whole bid under one name or town, and it just happened to be PC. And circumstances have dictated that they change the main venue of the OC/stadium to a place other than within PC borders.

This is exactly how I see it too.

It's not the distance from the centre of the city that's important, but the fact that it's still feels like part of the city. If it's in a suburb, then that's fine as long as that suburb still feels part of the named host city and not a distinct city of its own.

Winter Olympics bend this rule more than summer cities, but that's the nature of the beast.

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But Sydney & Athens were close by and **** not-important enough to the bigger aggregation of the major, "lead" city to be accepted as part of that. I don't think it would work if say, the main stadium were in Fort Worth or St. Paul...and then pass off the bid as Dallas and Minneapolis bids when 2 of the main components were in their own, self-standing cities. Plus, they had metro lines emanating from the center of the "lead" city to those suburbs--so in a way, the Sydney & Athens locations were "convenient" extensions of the named host city.

As for PC, they had to anchor the whole bid under one name or town, and it just happened to be PC. And circumstances have dictated that they change the main venue of the OC/stadium to a place other than within PC borders.

CORRECTION: ***...and the 'burbs were not important enough.

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The Groundbreaking Ceremony of the Olympic Sliding Center for the Success of the PyeongChang Winter Olympics 2018

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The groundbreaking ceremony of the Olympic Sliding Center for the bobsleigh, skeleton, and luge competitions will be held in Alpensia, PyeongChang on Mar. 4th, 2014 with the participation of Governor Choi, POCOG, relating organizations and citizens.

This construction will be done with the standard of the FIBT, FIL and IOC on the site of Yongsan-ri, Daegwallyeong-myeon, Pyeongchnag-gun with 177,000 m².

Gangwon Province ordered the construction on July, 2013 with the turnkey type and selected Daelim Inc. and two other companies in the Gangwon as the co-designers for the project on Dec. 2013.

The Sliding Center is scheduled to be built along with 7 buildings including 2018 m completion track, start and finish house, access bridge and road, machinery, electricity, communication, landscape architecture spending 122.8 billion won. The construction will be complete by the end of 2016 with the international approval in order to hold the Test Event and final completion of the Sliding Center is scheduled by the end of the 2017 considering fostering athletes and training schedules.

There are only 16 sliding centers worldwide and the Sliding Center is going to be the first one to be constructed in Korea. This construction requires a high-level of technology and is expected to be hard work, but it will usher a new stage to upgrade the domestic construction skills.

It will be one of the best world-class centers for the athletes and competitions during the Games and is planned to be used as the theme facility for all the people in Korea to continually experience and enjoy the Olympics for the legacy mode.

* Project Outline

- Location: Yongsan-ri, Daegwallyeong-myeon, PyeongChang

- Project Work: a total of 2,018m long track(B=140cm) in 177,000㎡ site area

- Cost: KRW122.8 billion (about USD114.5 million)

- National Government 92.1 billion, Local Government 30.7 billion

- Completion: end of 2017 (homologation in 2016 for test events)

- Constructors: Project partnering of 4 companies (Main contractor: Daelim)

* Ceremony Outline

- Date: March 4, 2014 (1:30 - 3:00 p.m.)

- Venue: Alpensia Convention Centre, PyeongChang

- Guests: around 1,000 including

- Minister of Culture, Sports and Tourism, Governor of Gangwon Province and mayors of venue cities;

- President and CEO of the POCOG;

- Members of the National Assembly, Provincial Council, and municipal councils;

- Leaders of press, social, sport and community groups

- Contents: Blasting ceremony, and congratulatory performances

http://www.sportsfeatures.com/presspoint/pressrelease/54305/the-groundbreaking-ceremony-of-the-olympic-sliding-center-for-the-success-of-the-pyeongchang-winter-olympics-2018

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Is that last photo the Main Stadium? If so, I don't like the design. I know it's only temporary, but it's basic.

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Lol, actually I like it. LA Memorial Colisseum is one of the most beautiful and emblematic stadia from the Olympics. Anyway, I'm sure the South Koreans will re-design that, after witnessing that architectural competition we've seen since 2000.

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Yep - there is that too. It is likely just a concept hence the similarity to LA.

Sydney Olympic Stadium went through many design phases - initially it looked remarkably similar to the modernist bowls of Tokyo and Mexico City.

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IOC Coordination Commission Tours PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympics Venues

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3rd meeting IOC Coordination Commission Venue Tour (Apr 30) / POCOG

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IOC Coordination Commission Venue Tour / POCOG

PYEONGCHANG, April 30 - As part of the IOC Coordination Commission meeting currently underway in PyeongChang, the Organizing Committee provided a venue tour to demonstrate the progress made in its Games preparation.

It was a first tour of such kind after PyeongChang 2018 successfully launched construction for a few venues over the last few months.

The tour ran for five hours in the afternoon, stopping at the venues and venue sites as below:

 PyeongChang Mountain Cluster - the sliding center, IBC/MPC, Yongpyong resort, Mountain Olympic Village

 Gangneung Coastal Cluster - Coastal Olympic Village, Media Village, Gangneung Sports Complex, accommodations

After the tour, IOC Coordination Commission Chair Gunilla Lindberg said, “Following a very detailed briefing yesterday on the status of the different venues and with only four years to go until the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games begin, it was important for the Commission to be able to survey the progress being made on the different venues. We are pleased to see that work on key sites like the sliding centre and coastal Olympic Village has begun. The information provided to us on site reassures us about the development of the venues that have not yet been started. Also, the participation of the winter International Federations and National Federations this week in our meeting shows the strong spirit of cooperation between the different stakeholders, which will undoubtedly allow PyeongChang 2018 to deliver the best venues possible for the athletes.”

POCOG President Jin-sun Kim said, “Today’s venue tour holds significance in that we presented venues and venue sites for the PyeongChang 2018 Games, which are either already under construction or in progress for launching construction. This tour came after we established detailed plans for the Mountain Olympic Village. The tour also provided commission members and IF officials with an opportunity to look around accommodations in PyeongChang and around the areas located within one-hour drive from the host city.”

POCOG

http://www.sportsfeatures.com/presspoint/pressrelease/54409/ioc-coordination-commission-tours-pyeongchang-2018-winter-olympics-venues

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I'm sad, Korea will build a lot of venues for nothing, after 1 month in february 2018, they will never used again... All this money spend for nothing. It will be like the formula one track they built some years ago.

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