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17th Asian Games Incheon 2014


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^^ Yeah and wasting huge amounts of money on a ceremony that few people actually watched is also an awesome idea *sarcasm*.

Unlike other countries, Korea doesn't needs to show off desperately, because they are already known in the world stage (just like Japan and UK). They are probably waiting for the big thing in 2018 to show off their best cards,so it's stupid to conclude that Pyeongchang will be crappy because of this. I mean, Rio 2007 opening was very good while the opening of their WC this year was an embarrassing mess.

The ceremony, I won't lie, was cheap if you compare it to Guangzhou and Doha. Projections didn't had the quality like Sochi and some of the segments felt half-ass made. However it still had very good moments, such as the countdown (I liked the idea of each number dedicated to a participating country), the original lone ring kid of Seoul '88 appearing (seriously, this could had worked better in Pyeongchang since it's Korea second olympics) and the scene with the 5 singers. However some like the train/plane and primitive Asia segments were kinda badly made and poorly executed. The finale with the boat could had been better but it was decent.

I liked the placard girls and the idea of each one represeting the flower of the host country. While the lightning of the cauldron was forgettable, the cauldron itself is nice. I like the idea of a Fire Fountain, it would had been better if the cauldron tower rised a bit more after the lightning was done. As for the K-Pop segment, I never cared much for this genre so meh.

Overall, I give it a 6.5-7/10. Ok ceremony, but that's it. Still better than the WC opening.

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it really confusing when i said this and then someone else said "hey it's still going" it really made me like mad besides sporting events like olympics, asiad, sea games and pon are the most useful events for tvri if we looking from the amount of people watching the station so cutting down these shows when it's still going is really weird i mean when they have the opportunity why don't use it and something like this is really is strange and honestly may i ask you in which city and province do you live in and how was the games broadcasted there ? is it cutted for local some local shows because here in malang ( and also the rest of east java ) they cut some hours of the games for some local shows because if you watch tvri you have to know in which city and province you are because when it comes to local shows it really matters....

I live in Jakarta, and what I've found is TVRI cut the ceremony due to stupid broadcast quota thingies... While TVRI Nasional and some of other local TVRI stations (like TVRI DKI and others) were itching to broadcast the news, some of local TVRIs which have some night local shows (8pm or 9pm shows) cut it to broadcast their respective local programs.

It is very common to cut ceremonies in Indonesian TV. TVRI's Incheon 2014 events broadcasts were cut for 3-5 minutes per 30 minutes for "Indonesia Terkini". I couldn't even imagine when Jakarta is hosting, private-owned TV stations will most likely pay a lot of money to monopolize the broadcast and what the Indonesians got just badminton+football and the other sports will just broadcasted in news.

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I live in Jakarta, and what I've found is TVRI cut the ceremony due to stupid broadcast quota thingies... While TVRI Nasional and some of other local TVRI stations (like TVRI DKI and others) were itching to broadcast the news, some of local TVRIs which have some night local shows (8pm or 9pm shows) cut it to broadcast their respective local programs.

It is very common to cut ceremonies in Indonesian TV. TVRI's Incheon 2014 events broadcasts were cut for 3-5 minutes per 30 minutes for "Indonesia Terkini". I couldn't even imagine when Jakarta is hosting, private-owned TV stations will most likely pay a lot of money to monopolize the broadcast and what the Indonesians got just badminton+football and the other sports will just broadcasted in news.

yeah .... here in east java some local shows are given for 3 hours usually from 3 to 6pm so considering the ceremonies starts at 5pm it's just so annoying besides if i remember they end the opening when psy still singing so you have a oportunity to broadcast a world class singer with lots of fans that can give you some viewers but you still prefer your even-less viewers shows so it really such a waste of opportunity for tvri so i hope they don't do this again during the closing with big bang in the finale and yeah for jakarta private televisions will struggling for becoming the host broadcaster so they don't have to pay to tvri for some broadcasting license but anyway we should see how jakarta 2018 broadcasted here soon....

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Oh, I now see why Indonesia has insisted on hosting them in 2018. Not because of the elections but because "18th" Asian Games dovetails very neatly into 2018. That's why. It would look misaligned if it were 18th Asian Games in 2019. It's NOT that "election year" excuse.

and maybe they will start the ceremonies at 18:18:18 local time just like the sea games with 11-11-11 :D

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You're right, Stefan. I think it's better we start talking about the sport event itself.

So far, Korea is leading the medal tally with 12 gold, 10 silver and 9 bronze, followed by China, which has 32 medals but are one silver medal away from Korea. Japan is at third place with 26 medals (7 gold, 8 silver and 11 bronze).

Also some bad news happened, organization wise :S

Salmonella, other dangerous bacteria found in Asian Games' lunchboxes

South Korea's Food and Drug Safety Ministry has found salmonella and other potentially dangerous bacteria in lunchboxes prepared for athletes and staff at the Asian Games, prompting organisers to dispose of the stock and change supplier.

A ministry official told Reuters by telephone that salmonella had been found in a meat dish on Sunday and that the lunchboxes destined for athletes in Incheon had been ditched.

"We check dish by dish," said the official, adding that the lunchboxes were checked at the supplier and never made it to the Games. "There were 76 boxes and we've disposed of them all.

"The lunches were never delivered to the athletes. The check-up was done before delivery."

Another form of bacteria, colon bacillus, had been found on Friday in lunchboxes earmarked for Asian Games staff, the official added.

Both bacteria can cause diarrhoea, fever, vomiting and other ailments.

An Incheon organising committee (IAGOC) official said they were taking no chances when it came to athlete safety.

"For the Asian Games it's a rule to scrap all the food once salmonella is found, even when it's a tiny amount," he told Reuters. "We threw them away and changed the supplier."

While the Games have gone off without any major problems, there have been some early glitches.

The flame at the main stadium -- one of the most iconic symbols of Olympic and Asian Games -- went out for about 10 minutes on the first day of competition and had to be re-lit.

Several badminton players have also complained about the lighting at the stadium, while many others had to contend with no light at all when the power went out.

Malaysia's Lee Chong Wei, the world's number one player, said the lighting at the Gyeyang Gymnasium was too bright.

"Normally there are only lights side to side (at either end), but here you have them all around so you are looking into the light. I think it's tough for all the players," he said.

Asian Games: China Defend Basketball With New 'Great Wall'
China, with players like towering NBA superstar Yao Ming, have won seven of the last nine men's basketball gold medals stretching back to their first triumph in the Bangkok Asian Games in 1978.

Incheon: China are hoping a new version of their famous "Great Wall of China" can help maintain their Asian Games basketball dominance as they come under heavy attack from rivals. (Asian Games Full Coverage)

China, with players like towering NBA superstar Yao Ming, have won seven of the last nine men's gold medals stretching back to their first triumph in Bangkok in 1978. (Medal Tally)

But since their 2010 Asian Games victory on home soil in Guangzhou, China have seen the retirement of Yao, and have also lost former NBA players Wang Zhizhi and Yi Jianlian.

Now, under threat from hosts South Korea, Iran and the Philippines, they arrive in Incheon with two of the Games' tallest players who can forge a reputation of their own.

Zhou Qi, 18, will tower over the opposition at 2.17 metres (7ft 1 1/2in), while Wang Zhelin is equally intimidating at 2.14 metres (7ft 1/4in).

They are among the players drafted in as part of China's rebuilding programme under coach Gong Liuming after their defeat to South Korea at last year's FIBA Asian Championship.

Only five players of the 12-man 2013 Asian Championship squad have been selected for Incheon.

China, 12th in world governing body FIBA's rankings, have reached the final at every Asian Games since their first win 36 years ago, but on the last occasion South Korea hosted the Asiad, in Busan in 2002, the host nation pipped China to the prize with a dramatic 102-100 overtime victory.

Among their squad that day was centre Kim Joo-Sung. Now 34, the 6ft 9in (2.05m) talisman is only survivor from that golden generation and will be looking for a glittering swansong.

Kim first took part in the Games 16 years ago as a gangly teenager, taking home a silver medal as Korea lost in the final to China and was forced to settle second again four years ago by the same opposition.

He has enjoyed a resurgence in form this year in the Korean Basketball League (KBL), averaging 12 points and more than 25 minutes on court per game.

The basketball-mad Philippines won the first of their four straight Asian Games championships in 1951, but have only managed one silver and two bronzes since -- their last coming in 1998.

Their hopes of ending that 16-year barren run were dented when organisers banned their standout US import, the 6ft 11in (2.11m) Andray Blatche, a former star with the NBA's Brooklyn Nets.

The centre, who became a naturalised Filipino in June, did not meet a three-year residency requirement, the Games Organising Committee ruled.

Despite the blow, the Philippines still harbour realistic medal chances having brought in the 2.10 metre (6ft 11in) Marcus Douthit, another US-born naturalised Filipino, as a replacement for Blatche.

Iran, ranked 20th by FIBA, are potentially the surprise package of the tournament and rated by many observers as favourites.

Their main weapon is the former Phoenix Suns NBA star Hamed Haddadi and team-mate Mohamed Samad Nikkhah Bahrami was in confident mood as the team prepared in Tehran.

"We are going to win the Asian Games for the first time. Without a doubt, the Iranian basketball team will participate in the Asian Games to win the gold medal," he said, according to the Tehran Times.

The basketball tournament will be split between the 7,406-seater Samsan World Gymnasium and the 5,5158-seat Hwaseong Sports Complex.

There are 16 teams in the men's competition and 11 in the women's. Eight men's teams -- China, South Korea, Iran, Japan, Qatar, Philippines, Jordan and Taiwan -- are seeded straight through to the 12-nation group stage which begins on September 23.

Before then the eight unseeded nations -- Mongolia, Saudi Arabia, Kazakhstan, Hong Kong, Kuwait, Palestine, India and the Maldives -- will fight it out in a qualifying competition.

The women's tournament has been hit by a clash of dates for the leading nations with the FIBA women's world championship, starting in Turkey this weekend.

It means China, winner of the last three golds, and Japan will send only 'B' teams to Incheon. South Korea, however, are going all-out for home gold and will send their second string to Turkey.

The women's event, which begins on September 23, has six seeded teams -- China, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Japan and India -- who automatically qualify for the quarterfinals.

The five unseeded teams -- Mongolia, Hong Kong, Kazakhstan, Nepal and Qatar -- play in a preliminary round to decide the other two quarterfinalists.

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Australia 'interested' in joining Asian Games

Australia has welcomed the idea of possibly competing at the Asian Games after Asian Olympic officials agreed to let Oceania nations join them in smaller multi-sports events.

While there are no firm plans as yet to allow Oceania countries to compete at the main Asian Games, which are second in size only to the Olympics, the Olympic Council of Asia has now opened the door.

The OCA general assembly, meeting on the sidelines of the 17th Asian Games in South Korea, voted over the weekend to allow Oceania countries to compete at the next Asian Indoor Games, to be held in 2017.

The OCA president, Sheikh Ahmad Al-Fahad Al-Sabah, said the two regions were taking things slowly but the OCA had not ruled out the prospect of allowing Oceania nations to compete at bigger multi-sports events in Asia in the future.

"I think we have an opportunity," said Sheikh Ahmad. "But we don't want to go directly for everything.

"Let's do it step-by-step. Indoor will be good. Then we will think more."

The news was welcomed in Australia, which has long entertained the idea of forging closer ties with Asia to expose their athletes to stiffer competition from the likes of China, Japan and South Korea.

Australia sent a team to the 2001 East Asian Games in Osaka and in 2006, Australia's national football body left Oceania to join the Asian Football Confederation, a move that has helped trigger unprecedented success and interest in the game Down Under.

Australia qualified for the 2010 and 2014 World Cups and will host the 2015 Asian Cup and the Australian Olympic Committee said the country was open to participating in other events.

"We would definitely be interested in competing in the Asian Games," AOC spokesman Mike Tancred told Reuters.

While Oceania's participation in the summer Asian Games is likely to be years away, Sheikh Ahmad said OCA's next step might be to invite the region to compete at the Asian Winter Games.

Australia, in particular, has been investing heavily in their winter sports programme, winning medals at each of the last six Olympics, including two silvers and a bronze in Sochi earlier this year.

But Australians rarely get to compete in big regional championships because there is no major winter games event for Oceania or Commonwealth nations.

The next Asian Winter Games will be held in Japan in early 2017, just over a year before the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics in South Korea.

"We would view the Asian Winter Games as another opportunity to further develop our young skaters, alpine and freestyle athletes," Tancred said.

"It would be of particular interest because of Pyeongchang 2018 and with Beijing bidding for the 2022 Games."

The agreement to let Oceania nations compete at the Asian Indoor Games will be formally signed in November, when the Association of National Olympic Committees meet in Bangkok.

The Oceania National Olympic Committees, which represents the region's 17 member states, including Australia, New Zealand and smaller Pacific nations, will also be meeting in the Thai capital.

A spokeswoman for the New Zealand Olympic Committee said it was too early to speculate on the possibility of joining the Asian Games because the issue had still not been formally discussed.

"It's something at this stage we haven't had formal notification of and it hasn't been presented to the Oceania National Olympic Committees yet," she told Reuters.

"So it would need to go through that stage. There is a meeting in November and if this has some legs it might be raised at that point."

http://au.eurosport.com/all-sports/australia-interested-in-joining-asian-games_sto4411840/story.shtml

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Oceania should merge into Asia for all sports. It has been done before when New Zealand took part in AFC qualifying for the 1982 World Cup. Australia, New Zealand and the other island nations would make a great addition to the Asian Games and open up potential new venues for the Games themselves.

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The AOC should definitely not join the Asian Olympic Committee. Their style is quite dictatorial and while I'm all for sending a team to the Asiads I would rather we retain our organisational autonomy.

And in the process earn basically automatic Olympic and world championships qualification spots in team sports.

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Here we go again :/

http://in.reuters.com/article/2014/09/25/asiangames-qatar-idINKCN0HK0EM20140925

Qatar out of women's basketball over hijab row

BY PETER RUTHERFORD

INCHEON South Korea Thu Sep 25, 2014 5:15pm IST

hijab_25092014.jpg

(Reuters) - Qatar pulled out of the women's basketball competition at the Asian Games on Thursday after refusing to abide by international regulations preventing them from wearing hijabs, while organisers said they were powerless to do anything about it.

The Qatari players had been asked to remove their head coverings before their opening group game against Mongolia on Wednesday, but chose to forfeit the match instead.

According to International Basketball Federation (FIBA) rules, Article 4.2.2 dictates players cannot wear "headgear, hair accessories and jewellery".

With no sign of the rule being relaxed ahead of their scheduled match against Nepal on Thursday, Qatar decided to withdraw from their remaining games at the 17th Asiad, which is being run under the slogan: 'Diversity Shines Here'.

"We have decided not to take part in the remainder of the Asian Games women's basketball competition," an assistant with Qatar's National Olympic Committee told Reuters by telephone.

Nepal's players took the court for 15 minutes at the Samsan World Gymnasium, passing and shooting among themselves, before the forfeit was announced.

Both Qatar games were recorded as 20-0 defeats on the Games' official website.

HOT TOPIC

The wearing of hijabs has become a hot topic in sport in recent years with Muslim athletes complaining that they are being discriminated against.

Judoka Wojdan Ali Seraj Abdulrahim Shaherkani hit the headlines at the 2012 London Olympics when Saudi Arabia demanded she be allowed to compete wearing a hijab.

While international judo federation rules at the time barred her from doing so, Shaherkani was eventually allowed to compete wearing a modified veil.

Human Rights Watch told Reuters it should have been up to FIBA to prove why Qatari players should not wear headscarves.

"We oppose any general ban on wearing of headscarves and onus should be on the regulator to prove why a ban is necessary on the basis of health and safety," it said.

"In the case of basketball, it's difficult to see how a ban on the headscarf is anything other than an unnecessary restriction on the players' rights to religious freedom and personal autonomy."

Competition at the Asian Games is conducted under the regulations of the sports' international governing bodies, meaning athletes in other sports are free to wear hijabs.

All four bronze medal-winning rowers of Iran's lightweight women's quadruple sculls team wore hijabs on Wednesday, while Kuwait's Najlaa I M Aljerewi and Iran's Aghaei Hajiagha Soraya wore them in the triathlon and badminton events on Thursday.

Basketball remains the exception.

FIBA said earlier this month it had held discussions on the issue and was introducing a two-year 'testing phase' on what players can wear, though that only applies at the national level, not international competitions such as the Asian Games.

An official form Incheon's organising committee had sympathy for the Qatari players but said the Games had to follow FIBA's regulations and that their hands were tied.

"There is not much IAGOC can do to help the Qatari players. We can’t change FIBA regulations right now even if we consult with them," the official told Reuters by telephone.

"Personally I feel sorry for them. All the other sports allow hijabs."

The situation has left Qatari athletes confused and angry.

"We have to take this stand," said Qatari player Ahlam Salem M. Al-Mana on Wednesday. "We knew about the hijab ban but we have to be here. We have to show everyone that we are ready to play, but the International Association is not ready."

'SURPRISED AND DISAPPOINTED'

The Asian Games, which prides itself on diversity and inclusiveness, has brought 9,500 athletes from 45 countries to Incheon to compete in the world's second biggest multi-sports event after the Summer Olympics.

Mohammed Abdulla, a player on the Qatar men's team, was frustrated by the lack of consistency.

"If you go to the athletes restaurant you can see many, many Muslim athletes from Maldives, Iran, Pakistan and Qatar wearing hijabs," he told Reuters late on Wednesday.

"How come some of the women are allowed (to wear it) in competition... when our women are not?

"I'm surprised and disappointed that the Asian Games, the Olympic committee did not allow them to compete with the hijab."

The Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) has also weighed in on the matter, issuing a statement on Wednesday that said: "The right of the athletes must be the highest priority."

Sports federations had a duty to protect athletes and "allow them to exercise their right of freedom of choice with dignity," OCA director general Husain Al-Musallam said.

Diversity became an issue even before the Games began on Sept. 19 when Saudi Arabia revealed that its 199-strong team did not include any female athletes.

The Saudi stance sparked criticism from Human Rights Watch, which condemned its all-male line-up, saying the ultra-conservative state was shutting the door on female athletes, having previously shown signs of wanting to break down barriers.

(Additional reporting by Kahyun Yang; Editing by John O'Brien)


Poor crowd participation at most of the venues even though the competition is really tough :(

Which proves why many on the forums are worried about Pyeongchang 2018, since there are fears the attendance at those games will be low. And Incheon 2014 is not helping to mitigate those worries.

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Not to mention that some of the matches that Korea hosted during the 2002 World Cup had among the smallest crowds in recent WC history (25000-30000 range). Maybe the tickets are not affordable for many, maybe the ticket distribution system is to blame (I visited the Incheon ticket web site and got absolutely nowhere), or maybe the people just do not view this as an event as worth their time. Perhaps they are saving up for 2018.

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I've caught a few of the combat sports on YouTube, and it seemed that the attendance wasn't too bad.

The only Olympians I've recognized are Chinese swimmers Sun Yang and Ye Shiwen, and Iranian weightlifter Behdad Salimi.

I've been surprisingly entertained by the non-SOG sports like Wushu, Kabaddi, and Sepaktakraw. Maybe that's because I'm unfamiliar with all of them.

Is anyone else keeping up with it?

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The AOC should definitely not join the Asian Olympic Committee. Their style is quite dictatorial and while I'm all for sending a team to the Asiads I would rather we retain our organisational autonomy.

i think australia or new zealand should not join the asiad or they can suffer just like in this video....

https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DSO-nATNUkwQ&h=fAQGHZ1Y_ :

Sarita Devi Laishram vs Ji Na Park (semifinal) 30 September, 2014 Asian Games matchfixing

https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DBrnz1sj01xo&h=DAQFqOX0z :

Korean cheating in boxing on 2014 Incheon Asian Games Must watch
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i think australia or new zealand should not join the asiad or they can suffer just like in this video....

https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DSO-nATNUkwQ&h=fAQGHZ1Y_ :

Sarita Devi Laishram vs Ji Na Park (semifinal) 30 September, 2014 Asian Games matchfixing

https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DBrnz1sj01xo&h=DAQFqOX0z :

Korean cheating in boxing on 2014 Incheon Asian Games Must watch

apologize for those videos it is actually showing the fact that the world is angry to south korea for cheating the 2 video showed above is some examples from boxing and this is what happened after that

10690216_1482714368680273_41419297400560993746_10152749527464491_761820566098385

here is another example...

10624956_1510676615837217_50061607394422

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apologize for those videos it is actually showing the fact that the world is angry to south korea for cheating the 2 video showed above is some examples from boxing and this is what happened after that

10690216_1482714368680273_41419297400560993746_10152749527464491_761820566098385

here is another example...

10624956_1510676615837217_50061607394422

i've found the video for the football one

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D8isWXk-XAz8&h=NAQHNdbul

and by the the mongolian flag looks funny in incheon

real version....

Flag_of_Mongolia.jpg

incheon version...

i've found the video for the football one

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D8isWXk-XAz8&h=NAQHNdbul

and by the the mongolian flag looks funny in incheon

real version....

Flag_of_Mongolia.jpg

incheon version...

what a shame

i've found the video for the football one

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D8isWXk-XAz8&h=NAQHNdbul

and by the the mongolian flag looks funny in incheon

real version....

Flag_of_Mongolia.jpg

incheon version...

what a shame

watch it here:https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/v/t34.0-12/974679_10153461379355752_1555224497_n.jpg?oh=2016c863273f8162c0f6c4b414ce6d95&oe=542E3001&__gda__=1412299025_3959673fffcb753305d9ee767759fd37

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another proof!!!!!

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DhkTT1Oa2Un8&h=AAQFp4jpc

Saeid Abdevali (Iranian wrestler) Has Been Cheated...

another proof!!!!!

http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DhkTT1Oa2Un8&h=AAQFp4jpc

Saeid Abdevali (Iranian wrestler) Has Been Cheated...

The Story Here Is...

Although the Iranian wrestler (Blue) had won the match, unfair judge made his final decision to the benefit of the Korean wrestler (Red). Korean people should be ashamed for this clear lobby.


Although the Iranian wrestler (Blue) won the battle, but by unfair judge they finally made win for the Korean wrestler (Red).

full match here : http://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fyoutu.be%2FI4Bp3Vqn27M&h=wAQF1cpi5

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