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An inspiring design story

In 2005, the London Games organisers had a vision: to deliver an Olympic and Paralympic Games that would inspire a generation. But to make this happen, they needed creators, designers, architects and engineers.

Britain’s designers stepped up to the challenge – in some cases helping develop new standards and ways of working. Long after the summer of 2012, this will continue to raise the bar – not just for the many designers involved in the Games but for the entire British design industry.

Read about the organisers’ guiding principles from innovation to legacy in the 2012 Design Story.

From a sketch to a stadium. An idea to a brand. Unpick the London 2012 Games and you reveal a series of golden threads, each leading back to a different yet integrated design story.

We hope you enjoy exploring these stories of London 2012 and feel inspired by the transformational power of design.

http://www.beyond2012.org.uk/the-2012-design-story/

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still wondring how this happened...

fashion-design.jpg

?? :blink:

RCA_Thomas_Crisp_SLIDE2.jpg

The lovely Stella McCartney athletes uniforms did help make up for the ill-conceived “creations” above.

...also it seemed there was a lack of city trim, specifically effective banners, just never got the sense of banners even in the park, it all seemed sterile with some pink wayfinding now and again. I liked the interior venue floors and colors schemes a lot. Only saw on TV and extensive Internet searching.

built-environment.jpg

Edited by paul

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still wondring how this happened...

fashion-design.jpg

?? :blink:

RCA_Thomas_Crisp_SLIDE2.jpg

Easy- a bunch of London students were given the chance to kick-start their careers, or alternatively to learn to live with their mistakes ....

...also it seemed there was a lack of city trim, specifically effective banners, just never got the sense of banners even in the park, it all seemed sterile with some pink wayfinding now and again. I liked the interior venue floors and colors schemes a lot. Only saw on TV and extensive Internet searching.

The park wasn't supposed to be about banners, and it certainly wasn't sterile:

phone4.jpg

[londonist.com]

Once you were in the Park, you knew you were at the Olympics; why would you need big banners to remind you?

And where exactly were you looking for banners around the city?

london-2012.jpg

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Parts of the city were very nicely dressed, other parts were sparse. London's a big place though I guess, so you're not going to get everywhere plastered in banners. And I also expected more banners in the central concourse of the Park, but those that were there looked great. Lords, Wembley, Horse Guards (and the Mall), and especially Wimbledon were beautifully dressed though. Will upload some photos when I get a chance (maybe on one year to go I'll open a photo memories thread).

An inspiring design story

In 2005, the London Games organisers had a vision: to deliver an Olympic and Paralympic Games that would inspire a generation. But to make this happen, they needed creators, designers, architects and engineers.

Britain’s designers stepped up to the challenge – in some cases helping develop new standards and ways of working. Long after the summer of 2012, this will continue to raise the bar – not just for the many designers involved in the Games but for the entire British design industry.

Read about the organisers’ guiding principles from innovation to legacy in the 2012 Design Story.

From a sketch to a stadium. An idea to a brand. Unpick the London 2012 Games and you reveal a series of golden threads, each leading back to a different yet integrated design story.

We hope you enjoy exploring these stories of London 2012 and feel inspired by the transformational power of design.

http://www.beyond2012.org.uk/the-2012-design-story/

Nice website. thanks for the link. Really nice that it's all in one place like this! :)

I see the official 2012 site has gone now though... :(

Seeing as this isn't a look of the games thread, but a legacy thread, what's come out of these Olympics from a design point of view? I don't mean the projects we saw for the Games, but going forward....is this being carried into Glasgow, are Sochi and Rio copying anything London did or even working with ex-London designers, and for those who worked on the projects what's the general feeling about what was achieved one year on?

Edited by RobH

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I see the official 2012 site has gone now though... :(

Too bad! I was hoping they would keep it online as some kind of archive. The IOC has taken over the domain for at least 5 years:

Registrant:

International Olympic Committee

Chateau de Vidy

Lausanne, Vaud 1007

CH

Domain Name: LONDON2012.COM

Administrative Contact, Technical Contact:

International Olympic Committee renewals@olympic.org

Chateau de Vidy

Lausanne, Vaud 1007

CH

+41216216111 fax: +41216216216

Record expires on 20-Nov-2018.

Record created on 03-May-2013.

Database last updated on 14-Jul-2013 08:02:53 EDT.

Domain servers in listed order:

DNS1.OLYMPIC.ORG 193.178.244.1

DNS2.OLYMPIC.ORG 193.178.244.2

Luckily we have the waybackmachine: http://web.archive.org/web/query?type=urlquery&url=http%3A%2F%2Flondon2012.com&Submit=Go+Wayback%21

-----

An inspiring design story

In 2005, the London Games organisers had a vision: to deliver an Olympic and Paralympic Games that would inspire a generation. But to make this happen, they needed creators, designers, architects and engineers.

Britain’s designers stepped up to the challenge – in some cases helping develop new standards and ways of working. Long after the summer of 2012, this will continue to raise the bar – not just for the many designers involved in the Games but for the entire British design industry.

Read about the organisers’ guiding principles from innovation to legacy in the 2012 Design Story.

From a sketch to a stadium. An idea to a brand. Unpick the London 2012 Games and you reveal a series of golden threads, each leading back to a different yet integrated design story.

We hope you enjoy exploring these stories of London 2012 and feel inspired by the transformational power of design.

http://www.beyond2012.org.uk/the-2012-design-story/

Thnx! A lot of [design] images on this website as well: http://www.designboom.com/design/london-olympics-2012-the-look-of-the-games/

I hope they'll publish a book about the designproces of the look of the games someday.

I read something about a "London 2012 Look Book". Has anyone ever downloaded this book?

-----

Two competitions for tickets to the Anniversary Games:

http://sport.uk.msn.com/win-tickets-to-the-sainsburys-anniversary-games

http://bddy.me/127M2Qp

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Seeing the pictures of the park certainly takes you back there doesn't it. If only if every summer was lit up that way.

Im heading back this weekend for the Anniversary run, and the games the weekend after to re-live those incredible memories. I cant bloody wait.

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That may be the most beautiful single Olympic venue ever. Every time I see it from any angle or time of day it's a wow.

vpmr.jpg

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Sex, drugs and rock & roll

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Well, Rihanna and Timberlake apparently.

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E18HTEEN project scoops Beyond London 2012 Award

Tottenham Hotspur Foundation is delighted to announce that its E18HTEEN project has been awarded ‘Impact Project of the Year’ at the Beyond London 2012 Awards on Monday night.

The inaugural awards celebrate those organisations and individuals who have used the power and support of the London 2012 Olympic Games to raise awareness and create a positive social impact across a range of topics such as inclusion, employment and innovation.

In particular, the P&G UK Impact Award, supported by Sport Relief, recognises those organisations which use sport to address social issues within their local communities.

E18HTEEN sees Tottenham Hotspur and England striker Jermain Defoe act as an active ambassador, positive role model and mentor over a two year period to 160 young people aged 16 - 19 years who are either in care or are care leavers.

Each young person involved has been identified to participate in the programme by Local Authority ‘Virtual Schools of Children in Care’, with the objective of keeping them in or getting them back into training, education and employment as well as ultimately preparing them for independence and adulthood.

The project offers an individually tailored learning and development programme with free access to 18 separate training and life skill workshops and 18 different sports.

The award was announced at a high-profile ceremony at London’s City Hall with special guests from sport, government, business and development present including Lord Coe, Mayor of London Boris Johnson, Olympic Gold Medallist Katherine Grainger and Multi-Paralympic Gold Medallist Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson.

beyond_london730(1).jpg


http://www.tottenhamhotspur.com/news/e18hteen-project-scoops-beyond-london-2012-award-160713/

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A small number of tickets for the Anniversary Games will go on sale this Thursday [from 10.00]

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A small number of tickets for the Anniversary Games will go on sale this Thursday [from 10.00]

Any links as to where?

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Seeing as this isn't a look of the games thread, but a legacy thread, what's come out of these Olympics from a design point of view? I don't mean the projects we saw for the Games, but going forward....is this being carried into Glasgow, are Sochi and Rio copying anything London did or even working with ex-London designers, and for those who worked on the projects what's the general feeling about what was achieved one year on?

There's been a lot of cross-talk between the events obviously; we had teams from Sochi and Rio over on occasions whilst we presented the London venue look plans to the IOC, and in the final week leading up to the Games they came back with 2020 bid teams to be shown the venues in all their dressed glory. So there's definitely communication and the whole learning and knowledge transfer the Olympic movement is all about obviously. Glasgow took a lot, but more about logistics and installation rather than design, which had already been pinned down by the time London ended, although some former LOCOG members consulted and guided them. From what I have heard it's a step up from previous Commonwealth looks and pushing quite innovative ways of doing things with regards to way finding which sounds quite bold. What impressed the IOC about LOCOG was how integrated normally different departments were, for LOCOG the look, wayfinding, brand, marketing and culture departments were all working together rather than physically separate entities at previous OCOGS, and in doing so really pushed the whole collaborative working approach and the one seamless look programme. That certainly was seen as a major step forward.

In terms of the design itself, well London pushed boundaries, a little too far maybe but not for want to seeing what was possible. From what has been already seen in the public domain of Sochi's look of the games, well, it's incredibly similar in terms of venue colours and strategy to London's, just with just enough little elements to make it discernible as a winter olympics over a summer, and for the average person to not be thinking their watching London venues once again. What they do have over London though is money, and I don't think having to make decisions about where to spend and where not to is going to factor in their preparations. Rio, well, it's too early to tell. I can't even at this stage work out what their brand actually is, apart from the odd curve and green/yellow/blue palette. The only hint was the merchandise on sale at Casa Brasil in London; a mix of Copacabana sidewalk graphics and stone-shaped, oval-esque circles. After the straight edged, frantic shard energy of London and the pyramidal storyboard tiles of Sochi it'll be good to see a fully curvature look. Even harking back to one large-scale graphic cropped and rubber-stamped ala Beijing and Athens might be the answer. Who knows!

In terms of personal achievement, well it was the best work of my life. It hasn't been particularly easy returning to the 'real world' and one thing you realise very quickly is how quickly the world moves on after a Games, even more so as a creative, with such a large scale project you realise how everyone, or at least it seems like everyone says they worked on the Olympics, and you're really no different to any other designer. However, it's more the physical volume of what you achieved that sets you apart, and what specific skills you took from the Games that counts rather than the fact you worked on an Olympics. You also realise quickly nobody has a real clue of what you exactly did, and I think I'll always be asked until the day I die if I designed the logo. Although I've got to the point now where I just say I did and they generally shut up then.

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One of the closing remarks of the Beyond 2012 presentation as well was a quote from the Senior Director of Getty Images; "…with the genuinely dynamic look elements around the venues, the London Games achieved the highest visual standards I have seen covering many Olympic Games" which I think was probably the perfect quote to close the chapter of the whole London 2012 brand.

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the look seemed to have some strengths and some challenges, it'll be interesting to see how it feels in a few years with better perspective.



i had the HIGHEST hopes in the start when the logo was revealed, but i never stoped feeling they got scared or changed course at some point.

also not sure it reads YOUTHFUL as it was sold, it looked more like how an older person may view youthful.

.......just opinions on a forum.

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...also seemed like there may have been serious budget issues that did not allow extravagance, i never think that's a great excuse for innovative creativity however.

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Extravagance is one thing, but remember these Games were against a backdrop of a country in recession. Local councils facing cuts to services weren't going to be welcomed spending taxpayers money extravagantly on dressing up their boroughs.

LOCOG itself wasn't a bottomless pit of money and every piece of look had to be justified. It was never considered a negative though, just simply being prudent about where to spend money and essentially saving waste and being more sustainable. That's where the real hard work went and the challenge. Considering the breadth and scale of the project involving thousands of stakeholders and agencies having one seamless look and one creative vision, I'd say it was a pretty outstanding job which I doubt will be repeated anytime soon.

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Across London's boroughs the amount spent on the torch relay and related events varied enormously....the most lavish being Bexley which spent nearly £300k, right down to Wandsworth who (somehow) spent just £710.....

http://now-here-this.timeout.com/2013/05/28/somehow-bexley-spent-394x-more-on-the-olympic-torch-relay-than-wandsworth/

I don't know how much banners, bunting etc. accounted for this. I live in one of the boroughs at the very lower end of the spending scale, and I know the bunting that was up in the main High Street wasn't branded - just simple red, white and blue decorations.

Edited by RobH

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In terms of personal achievement, well it was the best work of my life. It hasn't been particularly easy returning to the 'real world' and one thing you realise very quickly is how quickly the world moves on after a Games, even more so as a creative, with such a large scale project you realise how everyone, or at least it seems like everyone says they worked on the Olympics, and you're really no different to any other designer. However, it's more the physical volume of what you achieved that sets you apart, and what specific skills you took from the Games that counts rather than the fact you worked on an Olympics. You also realise quickly nobody has a real clue of what you exactly did, and I think I'll always be asked until the day I die if I designed the logo. Although I've got to the point now where I just say I did and they generally shut up then.

Sorry for asking probably obvious questions which have been answered here long before: But what was your role in the 2012 Games? It seems you were involved with the official design of the Games - and if so, in which capacity?

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I was part of the Look Design team in LOCOG who developed the look with the various outside agencies and stakeholders.

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I was part of the Look Design team in LOCOG who developed the look with the various outside agencies and stakeholders.

-Did the "look" have a name?

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London 2012 Olympics 'have boosted UK economy by £9.9bn'
The UK economy has seen a £9.9bn boost in trade and investment from hosting the 2012 London Olympic and Paralympic Games, research suggests.
A report by the government department which promotes UK businesses put new contracts, sales and foreign investment in the last year down to the Games.
But the claims were met with scepticism by some economists and the Federation of Small Businesses.
Government estimates put the cost of hosting the Games at £8.9bn.
Mayor missed long-term London Olympic jobs targets, says report
London Mayor Boris Johnson has failed to deliver long-term Olympic jobs for the capital, a new report suggests.
A year on, the government and the mayor say London 2012 has generated nearly £10bn for the economy and led to 70,000 jobs for Londoners.
But the study, by consultants SQW, reveals failings in flagship projects set up to generate long-term jobs. One scheme was terminated early.
A spokeswoman for the mayor insisted his results were reasonable.
The study found there was "exemplary" practice - led by games organiser Locog - to ensure temporary jobs during the games went to local people.

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