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Jesus Christ. I can't handle this anymore.

GC Lions just hit on Tony. That is it. The internet is finished.

Weird. Seeing the venues now actually makes me sad.

Me too. That’s exactly how I felt, sad seeing the empty unadorned venues (and that heavy-grey London sky doesn’t help). It made me think of the insane chasm between games needs and city needs. It must leave a very empty place in ones heart to see the games leave your city after the party. How lucky we are that it’s still possible to keep pulling this off (almost) every 4 year.

No offence to London (one of my absolute favorite cities by far), but seeing that sky in those shots and remembering the grey skies and crisp weather at games-time got me thinking about how weather affects the mood and success of a games. I was looking at some photos of the Sydney stadium during athletics and the LIGHT WAS GLORIOUS, reminiscent of the light at LA84 opening ceremony/games. Light is important to mood and it got me thinking that amazing clear skies and brilliant sunlight may really be an important element to achieve the highest level of atmosphere in summer games. We know that light is so different in different cities and when I travel it’s one of the things that affects my mood most and creates a unique and lasting impression of the place I’m visiting.

Think about what many call the 3 most successful games of all time (IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER).

Barcelona 1992

Sydney 2000

LA84

Did weather and light push them to the top of games-mood-atmosphere rankings? I mean we do hear the word "atmosphere" constanatly used to describe how successful a games were.

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Me too. That’s exactly how I felt, sad seeing the empty unadorned venues (and that heavy-grey London sky doesn’t help). It made me think of the insane chasm between games needs and city needs. It must leave a very empty place in ones heart to see the games leave your city after the party. How lucky we are that it’s still possible to keep pulling this off (almost) every 4 year.

No offence to London (one of my absolute favorite cities by far), but seeing that sky in those shots and remembering the grey skies and crisp weather at games-time got me thinking about how weather affects the mood and success of a games.

I've gotta stick up for London's games weather. Apart from one morning where it bucketed down as I went to Wimbledon (and which cleared by afternoon) and one lunchtime when I delayed going out for an hour as a heavy rain passed, it was sunny and hot just about the rest of the two weeks I was there (I think Sydney had more frequent, if light, rain in its second week). I came back to Oz with a tan, only once wore long trousers instead of shorts and still have Brits telling me how games time was the best two weeks of weather they had all summer. The sun truly shone on the UK's games.

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The weather was alright, much better than we could've hoped for after the sodden June we had, but I was rained on at least three or four times during the Games (at the hockey several times, before and after the handball, early morning archery was wet) and never felt it was that hot. You must've been very lucky with your sessions TBF! The weather certainly could've been better for me at times!

The weather at the Paralympics however was beautiful; a real Indian Summer!

rszockey.jpg

Yes Paul, I think weather does make a difference, but London was never likely to be perfect in that sense was it?! :lol: And seeing the shots I posted on the previous page is weird with the snow and mud having been in the Park during Games time. It doesn't make me sad though as the Park's in transition. It's not empty and quiet because it's neglected, quite the opposite in fact.

Edited by RobH
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The weather was alright, much better than we could've hoped for after the sodden June we had, but I was rained on at least three or four times during the Games (at the hockey several times, before and after the handball, early morning archery was wet) and never felt it was that hot. You must've been very lucky with your sessions TBF! The weather certainly could've been better for me at times!

Maybe it's rose-coloured memories, maybe because it defied all expectations or reputation, but I was really pleased with the weather during the two weeks. I wouldn't have wanted it to be hotter (and "meditterranean is a bit of a stretch), it really was just perfect for me.

Actually, I've spent week-plus summer visits to all Ireland, Scotland and England in the past decade, and always had pretty good weather (at least 70-80 per cent of the time nice, the rest rain of varying degrees), and each time get told by the locals: "you're lucky, you've got our only good weather all summer. It's been shite up to now!". Either you British Islanders really are just playing up your crap weather reputation, or I truly am the God of British and Olympic "Sunny with Occasional Showers" weather.

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….oh yes I remember, the horrid wet weather in the lead-up
luckily gave way to better conditions during the games. I didn’t mean to diminish
the sunny skies on many days; one must admit it was damp and overcast at times
however. Didn’t we sort of sweat out weather (pun intended) it would rain on
the OC up to the start? All meteorology aside, I’ve only heard review that the spirit-atmosphere
at London was fantastic due in large part to amazingly inviting and encouraging
spectators, happy and helpful games-makers, and excellent planning and
organization by LOCOG.

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Weird. Seeing the venues now actually makes me sad.

The comforting thing is that after this long sad post-Olympic autumn and winter, a new summer with a partially re-opened and "revived" Olympic Park will follow. We only have to wait another six months, and I think that the past six months really flew by. So the Olympic Park will be back in its old glory (and with glorious sunshine or at least warmer temperatures) in a jiffy!

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Think about what many call the 3 most successful games of all time (IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER).

Barcelona 1992

Sydney 2000

LA84

Did weather and light push them to the top of games-mood-atmosphere rankings? I mean we do hear the word "atmosphere" constanatly used to describe how successful a games were.

Paul, I do understand your comments regarding the light and the overall weather conditions. But London's weather wasn't that bad. I thought 2 days before the games that it would be a washout... but I saw many days of competion when the sun was out and the temperatures were in the low to mid 20's. I think given the weather the U.K. had as a whole for 2012 - London's 4 weeks of competition, for both Olympic and Paralympic sport, did really well compared.

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Very exciting. I have to say, the best results of the London Olympics are yet to come. I have a feeling that when I visit, it might just trump Munich as my favourite Olympic Park.

Does anybody know what LOCOG's timeline is for winding up operations? I vaguely have a feeling that Olympic organising committees tend to exist until at least the IOC Session the following year.

SOCOG from Sydney 2000 was largely absorbed by the Sydney Olympic Park Authority.

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image-13857-220-auto-both-both-85-5.jpg

Highly anticipated London Grand Prix event held on Olympic Park goes on general sale

BADMINTON England today announced that the highly anticipated London Grand Prix event taking place at the Copper Box on Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park from 1-6 October will go on sale from today.

The event will see some of the world’s best player’s return to London as part of the Badminton World Federation’s (BWF) Grand Prix Gold event series, giving spectators a different badminton experience altogether.

Nicola Moloney, Head of Major Events for BADMINTON England said “This event will really showcase the athleticism, speed and power of badminton, whilst giving the spectator real entertainment value.

“We are presenting the London Grand Prix in a new and exciting way and with it being hosted on the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park it deserves the recognition as a key event on the sporting calendar.

“It also extends BADMINTON England’s major event portfolio, which is designed not only to attract fans from all over the world but to inspire thousands more people to pick up a racket and play.”

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will officially reopen to the public from July 2013 and work by the London Legacy Development Corporation has been ongoing since the Games ended six months ago.

Dennis Hone, Chief Executive of the London Legacy Development Corporation which owns the Copper Box, added: “I am delighted that the first tickets for a sporting event on Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park are now on sale.

“The London Grand Prix will be held at the Copper Box annually. It will be a fantastic event, adding to our programme of sport, entertainment and culture coming to the Park.

“Just six months after the Opening Ceremony of the Olympic Games we are making it happen with tenants in place for the venues, planning permission for thousands of new homes and a great new Park opening this summer.”

It will be the first time a BWF Grand Prix Gold event has been held in England and the London Grand Prix is set to entice current badminton fans as well as a new wave of sports fans who appreciate world-class sporting entertainment.

Tony Wallace, Head of Major Venues at GLL, the appointed operator of the Copper Box said, “We are delighted to welcome the BWF Grand Prix Gold to the Copper Box and are very excited that such a high profile, flagship event has chosen to base itself at the Copper Box during our first year of post-games operations.

“We hope that the London Grand Prix will draw visitors wanting to watch top class international sport and experience at first hand London’s Olympic legacy.”

For further information or to purchase tickets to the event please visit www.LondonGrandPrixGold.com

------

Has anyone here bought tickets for the London Athletics Grand Prix at Crystal Palace?

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  • 3 weeks later...

A couple of photos @DarJoLe posted over on SSC:

Slowly disappearing. However, inside, they've completely removed the temporary wall between the pool and the spectator entrance that during the Games formed the Olympic Family Lounge.

8496560916_8c6c7eb7ec_b.jpg

I believe there is another wall of glass to go in which replaces this and creates an 'air lock' as such for spectators entering the venue from Stratford Bridge before taking their seats.

Olympic-Park-six-months-a-013.jpg

What is also new and will look stunning is the removal of the temporary wall between the training pool and glass back wall. It was an IOC requirement during the Games, but now it's gone the view through and under the Stratford Bridge will look fantastic, even more so from a higher view than this.

Edited by RobH
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Weird. Seeing the venues now actually makes me sad.

That always happens after a super major event, it's like a trauma...but a happy memories one, thus making it imperative to keep the spirit alive by using the facilities...

What hurts event more is when a popular sporting venue is ripped away from you and there is nothing you can do about it...Christchurch's muched loved QEII Park Stadium built for the 1974 CWGs for example. Still got a wow factor right up untill 2011 and was about to get a major makeover, but then... :(

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And don't forget: Only five months to go until the Olympic Park will be partially re-opened! Just consider how fast the past month flew by, when I wrote about that it's only six months to go till the re-opening. So we'll really see the park in all its glory in no time.

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  • 2 weeks later...
14778olympicparklgfmt.jpg
EAST
a weekend celebrating the opening of Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park
27 - 28 July 2013 / 12:00
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park
Tickets:
To be announced
subject to availability
On the first anniversary of the London 2012 Olympics, EAST fills the north of Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park with the sights, sounds, flavours, creativity and style of east London.
Throughout the weekend, the stage plays host to international music acts, while an eclectic array of entertainment and activity takes place across the park.
The Real Food Festival brings you tastes from some of the city’s celebrated restaurants and street vendors.
The Discover Children's Story Centre brings interactive family storytelling alongside hands-on workshops.
The cutting-edge Eco Design Fair curates an arts & fashion market showcasing the best up-cycled, vintage & contemporary design in London.
The Art Car Boot Fair invites you to pick up an astonishing selection of art works and wares and get involved in all manner of artist-led activity.
Enjoy all this and performances and workshops from Theatre Royal Stratford East, Boy Blue Entertainment and Ida Barr; promenade musical performances; pop up theatre; family trails; picnics along the riverbanks; arts & crafts workshops and more to be announced.
Further details to be released soon.
Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for announcements on all our events.
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will be London’s newest urban park. This will be no ordinary average green space. State-of-the-art venues and attractions will sit alongside homes, schools and businesses amongst green open spaces and pieces of art in the heart of east London. For further information go to www.noordinarypark.co.uk. The Park will be fully open by spring 2014.

I had already bought a ticket for the athletics grand prix at Crystel Palace. I'm hoping to get tickets in the presale for the London Anniversary Games as well.

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Postive reaction to iCity's Olympic legacy - http://icitylondon.com/

A snapshot into how Olympic legacy will play out in one section of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park has been given the thumbs-up by communities living nearby.

Plans by iCITY to transform the former Press and Broadcast Centres in Hackney Wick were put on-show for the first time in a series of public consultations this month. The two buildings are set to be transformed into hubs built around technology and broadcast media, boasting copious office space, incubation and innovation areas as well as retail outlets, an outdoor theatre and a public area to provide space for events and up to 2,5000 people. Both Loughborough University and Hackney Community College will also have a presence and BT Sport, one of iCITY's anchor tenants, has already begun work on its section of the site.

Gavin Poole, chief executive of iCITY, said the community response to the plans, which will be officially submitted for approval in early summer, was overwhelmingly positive. "We think for a public consultation exercise, it couldn't have gone any better," he said. "The first bit they [the public] really liked was the employment opportunities for the local area. Also, at the moment, the buildings are pretty stale, they look like big warehouses but by the time we have fitted them out we are making them into something, as opposed to just the warehouses. They also like the sense of destination - it's a place they can go to even if they don't work there. It's a place they can watch theatre, go to socialise and also go and have a meal and it becomes quite a destination within the park."

Fleshing out the potential for employment, Gavin estimated a total of 4,000 jobs will be created on-site, with an additional 1,000 in the area, and said iCITY's links with Hackney College could pave the way for more opportunities. "Hackney Community college will be on-site," he said. "They are anchoring a digital apprenticeship and we are trying to make sure we develop another apprenticeship programme anchored there as well. We are trying to encourage all tenants to participate in apprenticeships schemes to employ local people and look at youth employment opportunities."

The next step for iCITY, a joint venture between Delancey and Infinity SDC, will be changing of documents with the London Legacy Development Corporation so it can take over the lease for the properties. But Gavin explained iCITY would probably only receive the keys for the site in January, should planning permission be granted, after the board had completed its transformation works.

And, despite admitting it was a "big site" to tackle, he explained there would be a phased approach to public access, ensuring people could be on-site before it was completed in its entirety.

http://www.wharf.co.uk/2013/03/postive-reaction-to-icitys-oly.html

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Talks are under way about staging top professional boxing in the Copper Box Arena at London's Olympic Park.

The £55m multi-sport venue is currently operated by Greenwich Leisure Limited.

And Peter Bundey of GLL told BBC London: "We are very close to an announcement and we are talking about the potential of world title fights.

"There will certainly be lots of national and European title fights. We are soon to announce a deal with a major promoter. It is exciting times."

The 7,500-capacity arena hosted handball during last summer's Olympics and goalball at the Paralympics and will soon re-open.

British Basketball League side London Lions are set to play their home matches there from August, becoming the first professional sports team to move to the Olympic Park, while badminton's London Grand Prix will also be held at the Copper Box in October.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/boxing/21961262


Don't forget, this is one of the neatest deals the LLDC has done on the Park. Greenwich Leisure who will operate both this venue and the Aquatics Centre will be ploughing some of the profits from events like this to fund public access to the Aquatics Centre.


_62136783_copperboxexteriorgetty.jpg

Edited by RobH
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