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Why NBC is reluctant to show much of Paraolympics.


msp2032

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I think there are several reason's why NBC does not want to show much of the parolympics.

1. They don't want to devote the money and the time to air another week and a half of another Olympic style event.

2. They are worried about losing viewers. Viewers could become "Olympic Out".

3. Timing:The Presidential Race and NFL season starting.

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I think the question is why is NBC Sports Network reluctant to show the Paralympics. The Paralympics don't belong on the main network, especially right in the middle of convention coverage. But NBCSN (or at least Universal Sports) should be showing more than a few quick highlight programs.

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I'm not puzzled by NBC not showing much - if you look at the US and the paralympics there has been a history of a lack of interest, although it was ultimately the disgraceful farce in 1984 that made sure no PG would be treated in the same way again. Unfortunately empty venue, no transport Atlanta isn't remembered well by the movement either.

There's a very interesting piece by Aimée Mullins, the US Chef de Mission.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/aug/31/us-paralympics-tv-coverage-disappointing

What puzzles me is why NBC secured the rights in the first place if they didn't want to use them. The bigger question is why the powerbrokers in the US, the country that has done more for disability rights than any other, and that's fact not opinion, are so curiously dismissive of disabled sport.

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I think this will change eventually. Remember there was actually a time when the World Cup wasn't broadcast in ths US. We also have a number of sports networks who are need more original programming and the Paralympics might provide that without making them bust their budgets

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I have heard a theory on the ABC coverage that they are neglecting to show it as not to show a connection between the Paralympics and the Iraq War (thus in my opinion, stirring up the anti-war campaign not unlike a certain photo and the Vietnam War, and cutting off the money tap to the military industrial complex sooner than expected).

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Sky Tv in New Zealand have been copping some flack with the lack of coverage in New Zealand. They are only giving 2 hours of highlights per day! Very disappointing to be honest.

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I'm not puzzled by NBC not showing much - if you look at the US and the paralympics there has been a history of a lack of interest, although it was ultimately the disgraceful farce in 1984 that made sure no PG would be treated in the same way again. Unfortunately empty venue, no transport Atlanta isn't remembered well by the movement either.

Maybe I'm just a little lacking on my history here, but what happened in 1984?

What puzzles me is why NBC secured the rights in the first place if they didn't want to use them. The bigger question is why the powerbrokers in the US, the country that has done more for disability rights than any other, and that's fact not opinion, are so curiously dismissive of disabled sport.

2 things.. 1) NBC was in it for the big prize, this is merely the secondary piece of the puzzle, let alone that they're largely occurring after Labor Day when kids are back to school and football is in full swing. And 2) I may be mistaken, but I think TV rights to the Paralympics are handled through the USOC rather than directly through the IOC. Don't know if that creates a different situation, but..

I think this will change eventually. Remember there was actually a time when the World Cup wasn't broadcast in ths US. We also have a number of sports networks who are need more original programming and the Paralympics might provide that without making them bust their budgets

Why would it change? Which is to say.. if it was going to change, why didn't it happen here? NBC/Comcast have a sports network that could use the programming. They also have Universal Sports (which isn't entirely Comcast-owned, but that's less an issue here than it is for the Olympics). You would think they'd be interested in the programming, yet they're reducing the Paralympics to I believe 5 1/2 hours worth of highlight shows. So I don't know what would happen in the next 4 years that they'd show it then after not showing it now.

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It doesn't have to be on an NBC related network. The rights are not a part of the Olympic package. In 1996, CBS showed some rather extensive weekend shows from Atlanta. I think A&E showed the 2002 Winter Paralympics. So I guess the key is a US city winning an Olympic bid.

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Maybe I'm just a little lacking on my history here, but what happened in 1984?

USOC and the Los Angeles Organising Committee for the Olympics refused to allow LA venues to be used for the 'games for the disabled', mainly, I believe, because they were determined to make a profit and the then little watched disabled games were a loss maker. The University of Illinois reluctantly agreed to host, but pulled out due to financial constraints. The events were then jointly held by Hofstra University (after many other US colleges said no) and Stoke Mandeville Hospital in England (which has extensive sports facilities designed for people with spinal issues/injuries). At one stage, the whole event was going to have to be staged in England. When Hofstra came on board USOC threatened court action if the games were termed 'paralympic' despite the fact that this had been used informally since Rome in 1960. However, as USOC almost killed the games it also saved it. Whilst I'm not a fan of Samaranch, he was determined that this never happen again, whilst careful not to criticise the LA set up. It does seem odd behaviour from the USOC looking from 2012, but I suppose in the context of 1984, the future of the Olympics was fragile, and the logistical effort of a disabled games was a complication.

Since Seoul, Paralympic games have been linked to Olympic Hosts, and Samaranch lobbied for the formal adoption of the word paralympic after LA, making the head of the IPC a full member of the IOC, and the President of the IOC is a full member of the IPC. This arrangement has now been extended to 2020, and I expect it to be a permanent one, since no future host would want to be accused of ditching athletes with disabilities for the first time since 1984 ....

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I don't think NBC is reluctant. I just think the IPC doesn't have a strong broadcast branch like the IOC does. Even in Canada there's little or no Paralympics coverage on TV. Just clips and coverage online (CTV's website).

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American television is driven by advertising and not much else. I would venture to say that most Americans have no idea that the Paralympics are even going on right now. I'm guessing that NBC is showing the bare minimum that they can get away with. Hell, I consider myself a rabid sports fan, and I really don't care about them either.

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American television is driven by advertising and not much else. I would venture to say that most Americans have no idea that the Paralympics are even going on right now. I'm guessing that NBC is showing the bare minimum that they can get away with. Hell, I consider myself a rabid sports fan, and I really don't care about them either.

I don't think anyone can doubt my credentials as an Olympics fan either - but I have to say I have not watched ANY coverage of the Paras this year so far.

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I don't think anyone can doubt my credentials as an Olympics fan either - but I have to say I have not watched ANY coverage of the Paras this year so far.

Is that out of choice or because the coverage has been poor in Oz?

I have to say I have been really enjoying watching the coverage here in the UK just as I enjoyed the coverage in Beijing. For me, the track, cycling and swimming events have been as exciting to watch as the Olympics and I am just loving wheelchair rugby!

These paralympic athletes are just amazing. Describing them as 'disabled' seems almost the wrong word to use about them. They can do things most able-bodied people could never dream of doing!

For me, they are just like the Olympics Part 2. It's a shame that NBC and other broadcasters haven't yet picked up on their growing appeal. Their condescending attitude is way behind the times!

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Just not interested much - never am. I thought I might be this year after having been to the real deal, but that hasn't been enough to get me watching. I don't know if the coverage has been poor or not, but I realised yesterday the ABC (government, non-commercial) has been screening more of it than I thought.

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I would love to say that I have watched them faithfully, but that is not the case. I do follow them through the results app on my phone and the London 2012 website. I have to admit that it is a very difficult event to follow with all the classifications in each event (Fifteen 100 meter finals for men as an example). Also consider that after spending hundreds of hours in front of the TV and laptop during the Olympics, I have a major case of burnout, so the proximity to the Olympics is not helpful either. I am ready to wrap it all up.

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P.S. Do we know if NBC will have the Paralympic rights through to 2020. The London rights were generally sold separately, so NBC either must have had them as part of their deal for the London Olympics or snapped them up because even though they didn't want them, they didn't want anybody else to have them either.

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I wonder if the Parlympics would do better for TV if they were held before the Olympics. The venues should be in place well ahead of the Olympics, so at worst there should be some minor setup changes to venues. If everything is built to be sufficiently accessible the first time, there really shouldn't be any need to change anything beyond the different fields or courts of play

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The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) is to scrutinise potential broadcasting partners more carefully in future after US rights holders NBC failed to show any live 2012 action.

NBC scheduled four hour-long highlights programmes on the NBC Sports channel, followed by one 90-minute round-up.

IPC president Sir Philip Craven said of future media partners: "We'll examine their values as they will examine ours.

"If the values fit, we've got a chance. If they don't we'll go somewhere else."

The London 2012 Paralympic Games ended on Sunday with a spectacular closing ceremony featuring performances from Coldplay, Rihanna and Jay-Z.

Channel 4 aired 400 hours of Paralympic coverage in the UK, while Australia's ABC screened more than 100 hours.

In Japan viewers had a nightly one-hour highlights programme. Its capital Tokyo is bidding to host the 2020 Games.

NBC did not show any live action and its 90-minute round-up programme will not be broadcast until 16 September.

Yet the broadcaster said the total of five-and-a-half hours represented an improvement on the 2008 Paralympics in Beijing, when viewers got a single 90-minute highlights package.

"The people of the USA, for example, particularly the parents and families of the athletes, they are all ready for Paralympic sport," Sir Philip added.

"Take the plunge, take the risk and then you'll succeed."

NBC said its coverage of the London 2012 Olympic Games was the "most-watched television event in US history", with 219 million people watching over the duration of the event.

But it drew criticism for delaying the broadcast of popular events until prime time hours.

Viewers also complained of problems with online streaming and edited versions of the opening and closing ceremonies.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-19541871

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I never thought I'd watch but I've been glued to it. The different levels of disability are a little confusing but the endeavour and bravery of the competitors are extraordinary especially when their 'back story' is told and we are made aware of what they have overcome.

If we look at China, before Beijing2008, those with disabilities were hidden away with people almost feeling ashamed but the Paralympics and its impact on Chinese society has told reversed that centuries old attitude.

People can choose whether they watch or not. But it is nothing less than an International Disgrace that the world if they choose to are denied the opportunity to see these courageous people excel, and inspire others in a similar position. Broadcasters should be signed ONLY if they guarantee to show an agreed amount of live and recorded action. And those that don't should be stripped of the right to broadcast BOTH the Olympics and Paralympics if they fall below such a standard.

International broadcasters will always pay millions to broadcast both events - if NBC didn't, you can bet Fox, CBS and ABC would, so the rights should not be sold in advance but done on a games by games basis and if they fail to meet their obligations they should be banned from broadcasting the next games.

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