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Tokyo 2020 Bid News

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50 year-old venues. They all have to be revamped and upgraded!

A lot of them yes, but there are also newer ones.

The football stadiums are all new, from 2002 FIFA world cup.

Tatsumi International Swimming Centre was built in 1997.

Ariake Colliseum and Kokugikan Arena are from late 1980s.

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Sorry. I'm just not excited by another Japanese Olympics. I'll go if it's Madrid.

But from the looks of it, I won't be spending much in 2020! :lol:

Spain had Olympics just in 1992, is too early as you and other friends had said.

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Of course Spain isn't going to win, but I agree with Baron that I'd be much more inclined to GO to the Games if they were in Madrid rather than Tokyo.

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I've just got back from Japan. I'm afraid I'm less excited by this bid than I was, although I'm sure it's robust enough. Every single one of my friends and colleagues do not want it. There is a strong feeling in the regions that Tokyo gets enough government subsidy and corporate dosh at a time when the Northeast is still sifting through the ruins and a third of a prefecture really rather close to Tokyo is still in nuclear lockdown. They are trying hard to shift public perceptions in Tokyo itself, and maybe that will work. One problem is that the bid team is stacked full of failed, troubled or extremist politicians, not least the chairman himself, who is more Lyndon Larouche/Jean Marie Le Pen than Boris Johnson. Tokyo really could do with a Seb as its CEO, Mizuno is no doubt a very good operator, and his company makes sports equipment, but it's hardly an inspirational choice, and that's what Japan needs. The Turks and the Spaniards have got bids that seem to be going tits up for various reasons, but they've certainly got quite a lot of never-give-up support amongst the locals, sometimes to the point of absurdity.

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The problem with this race is that although there are semi-competent contenders (or better), none of them is particularly juicy or exciting. The IOC will just have to go with the best they can get -- which isn't wildly inspiring.

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I would disagree there, or at least say that it comes down to personal preference. Tokyo is arguably one of the most exciting and fast paced cities in the world; Istanbul is immensely beautiful and photogenic, a great Islamic city straddling West Asia and Europe; and Madrid, despite the financial crisis and BCN 1992, itself is known as a great European capital.

I would say every bid race in recent decades has had a good selection of cities to choose from. To me, a dull bid race would be something like Abu Dhabi, Guangzhou and Guadalajara.

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To me, a dull bid race would be something like Abu Dhabi, Guangzhou and Guadalajara.

Actually, Guadalajara is quite beautiful. It is the living example of neocolonial Mexico as its best -- something that Mexico City, DF, isn't because the DF has become one gigantic, uncontrolled megalopolis. I like to think of Guadalajara as Mexico's Kyoto

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Actually, Guadalajara is quite beautiful. It is the living example of neocolonial Mexico as its best -- something that Mexico City, DF, isn't because the DF has become one gigantic, uncontrolled megalopolis. I like to think of Guadalajara as Mexico's Kyoto

Mexico has too high crime rate. The number of people that is being killed there due to Mexican drug war is compared to a war's death toll.

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Mexico has too high crime rate. The number of people that is being killed there due to Mexican drug war is compared to a war's death toll.

George, do you ever stay on the same trend of thought? I was NOT advocating that Mexico is a good possible host. All I was saying was that Guadalajara would actually make a fairly decent candidate, look-wise. Of course the whole drug situation makes it not viable at this time.

Jeez.

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The contenders individually can hold an exciting Games- all 3 of them. And I'll be excited by whoever's hosting them- in 8 years. It's just that this bidding race is so underwhelming. No drama, no debates. And Rome was the most exciting of them all, and now they're out. The next most interesting one, Istanbul, isn't giving us much to talk about.

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Paris should have bid i think

Yeah, a lot of people were hoping they might have bid. But bidding with Annecy limited their options and made it difficult for them to look or plan for 2020 while they had another campaign going on. Ditto the Germans.

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they shouldn't have gone for the WOG

Well, ,maybe they shouldn't have - nobody here have them much chance. But I have a feeling that after their series of disappointing recent summer bids, they were probably obliged to give their winter contenders a chance.

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I would disagree there, or at least say that it comes down to personal preference. Tokyo is arguably one of the most exciting and fast paced cities in the world; Istanbul is immensely beautiful and photogenic, a great Islamic city straddling West Asia and Europe; and Madrid, despite the financial crisis and BCN 1992, itself is known as a great European capital.

I would say every bid race in recent decades has had a good selection of cities to choose from. To me, a dull bid race would be something like Abu Dhabi, Guangzhou and Guadalajara.

I totally agree that Tokyo and Istanbul are fascinating, exciting cities. The Olympic bids, however, don't generate as much excitement.

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I think where 2020 is perhaps let down compared to some recent Summer bid races is that 2020 was always anticipated to be a tight race - much like 2012.

2016 was the smallest number of bidders since 1988, and it was thought candidate cities (or at least speculated, IIRC) that cities were holding off for 2020. However, this was not so. We have fewer cities than in 2016, and each with their own issues in varying degrees of severity.

I do however have a gut feeling that this is all about to change and 2024 might see the return of a 2012 type hyper race. We'll potentially see a big American city, a major European capital (Moscow? Copenhagen? Paris?), maybe Tokyo or another Asian giant (KL?), and of course Africa.

No matter the outcome of 2020 or 2022 - 2024 could be gigantic.

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Could. It's also possible 2024 won't feature the US, Paris or Africa -- or it will feature one of the three and make for a very straightforward campaign.

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I think where 2020 is perhaps let down compared to some recent Summer bid races is that 2020 was always anticipated to be a tight race - much like 2012.

2016 was the smallest number of bidders since 1988, and it was thought candidate cities (or at least speculated, IIRC) that cities were holding off for 2020. However, this was not so. We have fewer cities than in 2016, and each with their own issues in varying degrees of severity.

I do however have a gut feeling that this is all about to change and 2024 might see the return of a 2012 type hyper race. We'll potentially see a big American city, a major European capital (Moscow? Copenhagen? Paris?), maybe Tokyo or another Asian giant (KL?), and of course Africa.

No matter the outcome of 2020 or 2022 - 2024 could be gigantic.

It will depend on global economic situation also. A lot of countries withdraw their interest in front of a possible bailout

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Well, plus as they play the bidding game more analytically and really want to get the best returns for their investment, they will proceed more cautiously and prudently.

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Health and Sports Day Showcases Japan's Passion for Sport and Olympism

Tokyo, 9 October 2012 - Japan and its capital enjoyed a weekend of sport in celebration of Health and Sports Day, or Taiiku no hi. The public holiday, one of Japan's most popular, was observed on Monday, 8 October. Japan is the unique country to have such a public holiday recognising the importance of health and sport. Health and Sports Day, first observed in 1966, exactly two years after the Tokyo 1964 Games Opening Ceremony, is a tangible example of the country's passion for sport and the Olympic Values - excellence, respect and friendship - values that Japanese people truly live and share.

The Tokyo Metropolitan Government, Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC), the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, and numerous National Federations organised a large sports festival, bringing together athletes and the public at the Ajinomoto National Training Center and etc. More than 10,000 children and adults had the chance to meet 77 Olympians, Paralympians and athletes from both the summer and winter Olympic Games.

On Saturday, 6 October, a tree-planting ceremony was held on the Sea Forest Island. Now in a development phase, once complete the Sea Forest will reconnect Tokyo with the sea. The man-made island is included in the Tokyo 2020 plan as a proposed location for Rowing, Canoe-Kayak(sprint), Equestrian (cross-country), Sailing, Golf and Cycling (mountain bike). Thanks to tree-planting activities like the one this weekend, officials estimate that an 88-hectare forest will be complete in the near future.

The Sea Forest Island event brought together many kids, three London 2012 Games medallists and Tokyo 2020 executive board member and world renowned architect Tadao Ando, with all of them enjoying the day with a tree planting ceremony. The London 2012 Games medallists consisted of 3-time wrestling Olympic gold medallist Kaori Icho, women's 100m backstroke and 4x100m medley relay bronze medallist Aya Terakawa and men's 60kg Greco-Roman wrestling bronze medallist Ryutaro Matsumoto. At the event, Icho said: "Let's grow many trees at this planned Tokyo 2020 venue, the Sea Forest!" Terakawa added: "I really would love for everyone to experience the excitement and inspiration that the Olympics will give us."

Tsunekazu Takeda, IOC member and President of the Tokyo 2020 Bid Committee and the Japanese Olympic Committee (JOC), said: "Tokyo 1964 Games left a great legacy to Japan and Japanese people, and the Health and Sports Day is part of it. This day promotes sports and an active lifestyle to young people. That's why we want to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games again in Japan, to inspire a new generation with the Olympic Values and build a new legacy for the next 50 years."

http://www.sportsfeatures.com/presspoint/pressrelease/53390/health-and-sports-day-showcases-japans-passion-for-sport-and-olympism

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^No, only the finalist cities: Madrid, Istanbul and Tokyo remain in the running to host the 2020 Olympics

Bidding timeline

The timeline of the host city selection process was approved by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) executive board as follows:

2011:

16 May – IOC sent letters inviting the National Olympic Committees (NOCs) to submit bids

July and August – IOC asked for NOCs to submit letters regarding compliance with the World Anti-doping Agency code by 29 July. The IOC also requested submissions of proposed dates if countries want to stage the Games outside the normal period set by the IOC (15 July to 31 August). The IOC responded to NOCs on these points by the end of August.

1 September – Deadline to submit the names of cities interested in hosting the 2020 Summer Games

2 September – IOC confirmed that they had received six bids

3–4 November – IOC held an information seminar for 2020 applicants

8 December – IOC announced the drawing lots order of applicant cities

2012:

15 February – application files and guarantee letters submitted to the IOC

23 May – IOC executive board in Quebec City decided which cities were to be approved as official candidate cities

27 July – 12 August – Olympic Games Observers’ Programme at the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London

November – 2012 Olympic Games debrief in Rio de Janeiro

2013:

7 January – Submission of the official bid books

February–April – Visits of the IOC evaluation commission to each bidding city

TBD – Report of the IOC evaluation commission

June – Candidate cities briefing to IOC Members in Lausanne

7 September – Election of the host city at 125th IOC session in Buenos Aires

http://en.wikipedia....Summer_Olympics

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