Jump to content

Your verdict on the London 2012 Games


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 317
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

So, we have only about 32 hours of these Games of the XXX Olympiad left. I guess we can rate these Games now. First of all, I want to mention the audience - it seemed to be very sportsmanlike, very e

Oh come now, Adrian's hyperbole is hardly representitive is it? Why let it get to you or colour your opinion? Considering most Brits here recently responded to Blacksheep's arrogance about London 20

Well I was there, and I have several remarks to make about some small, yet significant, details: Security was minimal. Genially minimal. It was done thoroughly and properly, but unlike some huge e

Ok. I wasn't in London. I'm not saying Athens was better. I can't compare because I experienced one in person and the other via tv.

I simply shared the perspective of someone who WAS there. If you disagree, fine.

I loved my time in Athens, but I certainly wouldn't argue that their Olympics -- or ANY Olympics, for that matter-- we're the "best ever."

I don't perceive a competition between hosts and I have no need or desire to "make Athens look better." I'm not Greek either, btw.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There's one other thing that really harasses me: that temperatures below 35°C are just not a summer. I work with people from all over Europe, including Italians, Spaniards, Greeks and Portuguese people and many of them keep moaning about the Luxembourgish summer, that 22-26°C is faaaar too cold, brrrrrrr. Well then why did they choose to leave their so-called "idyllic" homelands? Surely they should have stayed back in their respective towns, if all that they consider important is the weather. For me, I find anything above 30°C as torture. I spent a month in Malaga and it was like living in a hair dryer. Give me a wonderful English summer's day picnicking in the park or by the river, or a walk through a sunlit Polish forest.

There's no such thing as bad weather - just inappropriate clothing :ph34r::lol::P

I prefer northern European summers and food, and I have no opinion on anyone who likes alternatives, but I really get upset at negative or subjective opinions based upon the fact that anything other than their preferences is wrong or uncool.

OK, just needed to get that off my chest!!!! :-)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

well - I live "around the corner" from London and I just can say that the weather was perfect for me...

It wasn't too warm and not too cold, but that is of course subjective - next to me sat a lady from Singapore during the closing ceremony - she had to wear a jumper and pullover and a jacket - I sat there in a shirt and I sweated the whole time...

Link to post
Share on other sites

There was one morning in London where I felt a bit cold and wore a jacket and trousers - the rest of the time I was never out of shorts and t- shirt. Gotta say, like Sydney's, which was spring here, it was the perfect weather for me, not too hot (usually - there WERE some pretty warm ones) and never too cold. I even came back to Oz with some good color (which has now long faded)!

I would have been far less comfortable if it was like a Sydney midsummer, or like Atlanta where I was dripping sweat within minutes of leaving an air-conditioned hotel or venue ( not to mention the daily thunderstorm!).

Edited by Sir Rols
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

By Jacques Rogge

The final Olympic Games of my 12-year term as president of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) were received with great fanfare this summer in London. Evidence of their success continues to reach me almost daily in the form of the question: “Were they the best Games in history?”

As much as it would please me to simply answer in the affirmative, I know such a response would be premature. My reply is always the same: “Let history be the judge.”

I say this not to take anything away from the thousands of people responsible for delivering London 2012, which was clearly an across-the-board success, but to draw attention to the considerable importance the IOC places on legacy – what an Olympic host city leaves behind long after the 16 days of sporting competition are over.

The Olympic Games are the largest sporting event in the world and for most host cities they are the biggest and most complex project they will ever undertake. Their organisation affects the whole of the city and its population and often includes urban, economic, social and environmental development that requires the broad and cohesive involvement of city leaders, regional and national authorities, Games organisers, local communities, commercial partners and all the members of the Olympic Movement.

The IOC actively encourages each city that bids for an Olympic Games to consider from the outset how they could utilize the event to bring positive, long-lasting benefits to its area and citizens. This sort of planning typically begins a decade before the start of a Games.

By the time Chairman of the London 2012 bid committee Sebastian Coe spoke at the host city election in Singapore in 2005, for example, the London organisers already had a firm and highly detailed vision for what they wanted to deliver in 2012 and beyond.

It included the regeneration of a massive industrial wasteland in East London, providing the local community with world-class sporting venues to train and compete in, new parks and residential areas, better transport connections and infrastructure, employment and business opportunities, sustainable construction, an increase in volunteerism, and the creation of the next generation of sporting champions by inspiring young people everywhere to become more involved in physical activity.

The organisation of the London 2012 Games themselves cost around 2 billion pounds, much of which was covered by the IOC and private funds. But the local authorities earmarked a further 9.3 billion pounds to leverage the Games as a catalyst for rapid city development and improvement, both tangible and intangible, that would otherwise have taken decades to achieve.

London 2012 has already delivered on many of its promises and by continuing to pursue others we are optimistic that the citizens of London will benefit from the Games long into the future.

The foundations for London’s achievements in this area were firmly built on the knowledge and expertise of past Olympic Games organisers. Massive urban regeneration projects undertaken by Barcelona 1992 and Sydney 2000, environmental and sustainability standards set by Lillehammer 1994 and Vancouver 2010, and programmes to encourage volunteerism and youth participation by Beijing 2008 are just a few of the success stories from past organisers that London used as a springboard for its own Games.

As the link between past, present, and future host cities, the IOC assists Games organisers through a comprehensive transfer of knowledge programme. Organisers of upcoming Games in Russia (Sochi 2014), Brazil (Rio 2016), and South Korea (PyeongChang 2018) are already benefitting from the programme, which includes an important debriefing that the IOC organises to give future host cities a comprehensive look at what worked well at previous Olympic Games and what could be improved.

This year it was London’s turn to pass the torch at the London 2012 Debriefing in Rio de Janeiro from 17-21 November. The Debriefing focused on all aspects of Games operations, from the moment a bid city wins the right to host a Games to long after the Games conclude. These meetings were also attended by representatives of the 2020 candidate cities Istanbul, Tokyo and Madrid, as well as other stakeholders responsible for staging the Games.

The London organisers had a great deal to pass on to their successors, who were given crucial insight into, among other things, producing and remaining focused on a long-term vision for their Games, the importance of collaboration between all parties during the planning and preparation phases, and ways to integrate the public into the event.

The Debriefing is by no means meant to provide a cookie-cutter template for future hosts. Rather, it is intended to provide valuable lessons that host cities can adopt and adapt to fit their own unique circumstances. We encourage upcoming Games organisers to innovate and expand on what they learn and ultimately improve upon the best practices of their predecessors.

London managed to do exactly that in preparing for and delivering the Games of the XXX Olympiad. It may still be too soon to call them the greatest Games ever, but ask the same question again in 20 years and you might just get a “yes.”

IOC

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, whatever, I'm pleased people are even asking that question given that it was "inevitable" we'd show ourselves up following Beijing. :P

The top dog has spoken, onwards and upwards to Rio...

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think coming after Beijing was a blessing, not a curse. People were ready for a games like London. It felt different, like the sport was more important this time. I think London got the chest-thumping/good host balance right.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

well, even if 2012 was celebrated in Paris, it would also have been a rip-roaring success. It was pretty much back in Europe where multitudes of nationalities can easily get to...unlike Beijing or Rio which will also be quite a trek for the northeners. And London/Paris was not the site of scorching heat either that was Athens.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really, I looked at going to both Beijing and London.

3 weeks in Beijing with 24 events, hotel and flight came in at about 3000

1 week in London with 6 events, hotel and flight came in at about 4500

Edited by faster
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really, I looked at going to both Beijing and London.

3 weeks in Beijing with 24 events, hotel and flight came in at about 3000

1 week in London with 6 events, hotel and flight came in at about 4500

Interesting. But I think that only proves that scarcity determines the economics. (And that's for a package, right?) Less foreigners were expected for Beijing (where also the cost of living is lower), so they priced the package very reasonably. Whereas London, which would be attended by a lot more crowds, made everything at a premium. But if, say I were an average Roumanian or Croat, it would've been easier on my budget to go to London flying or by train, and then hope to watch 2 or 3 events and maybe take in a little sightseeing...than flying to Beijing or Rio or Durban where stand-alone airfare during the Olympic Games period would be at a premium.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I have to brag a little but my trip to London cost me less than 300 euros, so I guess got a bargain. That's for plane tickets, three days stay and includes four events in the Olympic Park.

The weather was fine during the day but after sunset it always got quite cold, and I'm not even a fan of hot temperatures either. The only downpour was after the women's marathon. Other times the rain was only occasional and light drizzle.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I have to brag a little but my trip to London cost me less than 300 euros, so I guess got a bargain. That's for plane tickets, three days stay and includes four events in the Olympic Park.

The weather was fine during the day but after sunset it always got quite cold, and I'm not even a fan of hot temperatures either. The only downpour was after the women's marathon. Other times the rain was only occasional and light drizzle.

That's what I was saying. It could be doable on one's own budget...NOT the prices of the package deals. Those, faster, are always so marked up -- but you do get a nice hotel, etc., etc. In the end, one gets what one pays for.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The way to travel economically is usually to deal with everything yourself and not pay for any extra hand in between.

Btw, if anyone is interested in a small photobook I made of London, please pm me. I can give you the link but won't post it here publicly.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

In a better world...

...thousands and thousands of people assemble in front of a big screen in a huge public park in a huge city,

...watching the broadcast of an event in athletics, an often-overlooked sport,

...cheering for an athlete on his run to a second gold medal,

...and finally erupting in a huge roar when he finally does.

That better world existed in London in the summer of 2012 - and the more I watch videos like these, the more I feel confirmed that London 2012 truly were the best Olympic Games ever.

As a German or as a European, I'm used to pictures like these only from World Cups or European Championships in football/soccer, when big fan fests with huge attendances are staged for watching the own team play on the big screen. So it's really remarkable when even other sports draw that amount of public attention. I ask myself: Did comparable fan fests at other Olympic Games ever draw the kind of attention they apparently drew in London?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice of you to say.

Germany 2006 really brought the idea of the fanfest to these big events. The two 'Western' Olympics we've had since then have both embraced them, and I expect that to continue in nations where large public gatherings aren't seen as a danger. Vancouver, though, was the first to really do this properly in an Olympic setting and that's actually where London drew its inspiration from.

http://www.sportsmark.com/Olympic_Blog.php

I think what Vancouver and London did is now becoming the norm. I don't think there's anything especially unique about these cities, but both our Games benifited from being early adopters of the fanfest concept in an Olympic setting.

I expect Rio to do just as good a job with their fanfests and the Games beyond that. What's in that YouTube clip won't be seen as unique in a few years but part of every Olympic experience I think. A positive evolution.

Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...