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The Next IOC President


Nemo
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How does the election systems works here? Same as if it was chosing a host city (balots by the other IOC members)?

I believe so. And it would probably require at least a 51% vote of the membership. So if it's not achieved on the first ballot, then go on to the next round. dropping the lowest vote-getter.

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Interesting. Maybe I haven't followed the "pre-race" for the IOC presidency closely enough, but I didn't know that Bach has potential (or now even factual) rivals for the presidency also from Europe. I still deem him the frontrunner, however - and I believe the press does, too (not only here in Germany ;)).

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Sergei Bubka enters race for IOC president

ST. PETERSURG, Russia (AP) -- Pole vault great Sergei Bubka of Ukraine is joining the crowded race to become the next president of the International Olympic Committee.

The 49-year-old former Olympic and world champion notified IOC members on Tuesday that he is running to succeed Jacques Rogge, who steps down in September.

Bubka becomes the sixth, and likely final, contender to enter the campaign for the most powerful job in the Olympic movement.

''After careful consideration, I would like to take this opportunity to humbly inform you that I will submit my candidacy for the presidency of the IOC,'' Bubka said in a letter obtained by The Associated Press.

''I am fully aware of the responsibility that this entails and also of the difficult decision that each IOC member faces in deciding who is best to lead the Olympic movement in the coming years.''

Bubka scheduled a news conference later Tuesday to publicly announce his decision to stand in the Sept. 10 election in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The record field already includes IOC vice presidents Thomas Bach of Germany and Ng Ser Miang of Singapore, finance commission chairman Richard Carrion of Puerto Rico, amateur boxing association chief C.K. Wu of Taiwan, and international rowing federation head Denis Oswald of Switzerland.

Bubka will be by far the youngest candidate in the race, 10 years younger than the 59-year-old Bach.

Bach, a former Olympic fencer, has been seen as the front-runner. But the presence of six contenders in the field suggests there is no consensus favorite and the votes could be split.

Bubka chose to enter the race in St. Petersburg on the sidelines of the SportAccord Convention and one day before the start of IOC executive board meetings.

In his letter to IOC members, Bubka cited his background as an athlete, businessman and sports administrator.

''I am confident that all of these experiences give me a strong platform to work together with you to lead our great organization through the next exciting, yet challenging chapter,'' he said.

Bubka cited the values developed by the founder of the modern Olympics, Pierre de Coubertin.

''Our challenge today is to maintain those historic values while adapting and growing as the modern world changes immeasurably,'' he said, adding that he would follow in the footsteps of Rogge and his predecessor, Juan Antonio Samaranch.

Bubka competed in four Olympics from 1988 to 2000, winning the pole vault gold medal for the former Soviet Union at the 1988 Games in Seoul.

A six-time world champion, Bubka set a total of 35 world records - inside and out - during his career. He still holds the outdoor (6.14 meters) and indoor (6.15 meters) records in the event.

''From a young age I wanted to become an Olympian and I was fortunate enough to achieve my dream,'' he said in his letter. ''I was lucky. I had the right team around me. ... Even as an individual doing an individual sport, you cannot succeed alone.

''Only together, we are strong. Only together, we will be able to address the challenges that lie ahead of us.''

Bubka said the Olympics must inspire youth and ''find new ways'' to fight doping and match-fixing. He said he would present his detailed platform to the members in ''due course.''

Bubka served as the athletes' representative on the policymaking IOC executive board from 2000-2008. He was elected a full-time IOC member in 2008 and has served on several commissions.

Bubka has also been a vice president of the International Association of Athletics Federations since 2007. He and Sebastian Coe have been considered the main contenders to succeed IAAF President Lamine Diack in 2015.

AP

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/ap-source-bubka-entering-race-074649045--oly.html

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I would say that it's gonna be between Bach & Oswald instead, two top senior members. What Bubka has going for him is his younger age, but I don't think that's going to mean much to a traditional, old fogie organization in the end.

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In the unlikely event that Bach loses (an upset could happen...depending on how the pick for 2020 turns out, which sports are added and dropped), that immediately opens the door for a Munich winter bid for 2022.

I thought you just said he wasn't the favorite.

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I thought you just said he wasn't the favorite.

To my mind, Bach as "earliest declarant" was misconstrued as "favorite" inasmuch as no one else had signified their intent to run as early and as decisively as Bach. But in the end, he may still have the base to carry him over. These are just my conjectures. None of us will really know until Sept 10/11.

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To my mind, Bach as "earliest declarant" was misconstrued as "favorite" inasmuch as no one else had signified their intent to run as early and as decisively as Bach. But in the end, he may still have the base to carry him over. These are just my conjectures. None of us will really know until Sept 10/11.

Bach was deemed the favourite already long before he became the "earliest declarant". The one thing has absolutely nothing to do with the other.

And regarding your previous post: As I already said in the newswire thread on Bach's candidacy, a Munich 2022 bid wouldn't be harmed by a Bach presidency - and vice versa: a Munich 2022 bid wouldn't stand a better chance just because of a Bach defeat.

It's a common misconstruction that it can be dangerous for an Olympic bid if a man from the bidding country is the incumbent IOC President. But I can't recognise any historical precedent for that assumption: Detroit with its multiple bids sure didn't fail because Avery Brundage was in charge at that time. Furthermore, under Avery Brundage's "reign", Squaw Valley got the 1960 Winter Games and Denver (originally) got the 1976 Winter Games.

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To my mind, Bach as "earliest declarant" was misconstrued as "favorite" inasmuch as no one else had signified their intent to run as early and as decisively as Bach. But in the end, he may still have the base to carry him over. These are just my conjectures. None of us will really know until Sept 10/11.

When he declared is irrelevant to his status as frontrunner. He was described as the favorite by many over a year ago, long before anyone declared.

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When he declared is irrelevant to his status as frontrunner. He was described as the favorite by many over a year ago, long before anyone declared.

Well, if you're the ONLY ONE, then of course, you would be the favorite. I mean...no one else is running then...so who do you measure your chances against?? :rolleyes:

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Well, if you're the ONLY ONE, then of course, you would be the favorite. I mean...no one else is running then...so who do you measure your chances against?? :rolleyes:

Sometimes these boards make me feel like I'm in the twilight zone.

Why is it so complicated that Bach was the favorite over a year ago? Who cares who declared when? Nobody ever thought he'd be the only candidate and so far all of the contenders who were predicted months ago have jumped into the race. I just don't see why this is an issue for you.

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IDK - but how can we be so sure that Avery Brundage wasn't part of the reason for Detroit's multiple losses. It's so strange cuz that was the city he was born in, too. Squaw Valley & Denver seem to be irrelevant since those were winter bids. Not to mention that out of the competition for 1960, only Innsbruck was the real competitor, since both St. Moritz & G-P had already hosted & Karachi wasn't going to get it.

And once Denver & Montreal got both sets of Games for 1976, Detroit had already threw in the towel. Even Los Angeles didn't benefit in that scenario. So I think the multiple failed U.S. summer bids (the more coveted Olympic prize) speaks much more than the two winter U.S. bids that were won under his tenure. No country that has had a president in office post WWII has hosted a Summer Olympics other than Spain. And that was mainly bcuz of JAS' interventions. So in Munich's case it may not matter anyway since that is a winter bid, TBW.

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