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The Next IOC President


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That was just a tradition that Samaranch started. Rogge is merely reverting to the norm. Could be!

This guy is ABSOLUTELY NO FUN to be with!!

just to clarify...

Here's a new name to the mix I haven't seen mentioned before:

Fasel still weighing up move for IOC Presidency

January 21 - International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) chief René Fasel claims he is still considering whether to not to run for the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Presidency later this year after emerging as one of the leading candidates to replace Jacques Rogge.

The 62-year-old dentist from Switzerland has been an IOC member since 1995 while he has been a member of the Executive Board since 2008.

Fasel is considered one of the key contenders to take over from Rogge when his 12-year reign ends at the 125th Session in Buenos Aires in September this year with Germany's Thomas Bach, Singapore's Ng Ser Miang, Puerto Rico's Richard Carrion, Morocco's Nawal El Moutawakel and Taiwan's C K Wu among the other names likely to put forward themselves to succeed the Belgian.

But Fasel admits that he will take his time over making a final decision given that IOC members will not have to officially declare their candidacy until June 10, when they will then become bound by the stringent ethical codes governing IOC election campaigning.

"It honours me that people are thinking about me as a candidate for the IOC Presidency," Fasal told insidethegames.

"But I will make my decision when the time comes.

"I don't really know yet so we will just see what happens.

"Candidates will not have to come forward until June so that would be the time to decide.

"But as I say, I feel honoured that people talk of me like this.

"My life is sport so if I can bring something to sport and the Olympic Movement like this then why not?

"But we will see.

"There are still many challenges for the future and Jacques speaks about that often when he talks about the size of the Games, the cost of the Games, the political impact of the Games and the legacy of the Games.

"So the future President will have a lot of challenges to deal with all of these issues.

"I have always maintained that it would be wrong going forwards if we can only take the Olympic Games to countries that have the money to stage them because then we restrict the Games to only a few small areas.

"That should not be the case and that is perhaps one of the biggest challenges for the next President and indeed the Olympic Movement over the next 20 to 30 years."


Fasel, who is also the President of the Association of International Olympic Winter Sports Federations (AIOWF), praised Rogge, who is a surgeon by profession, for the work he has done since taking over as IOC President in 2001, saying that he has a difficult task in taking over from the charismatic Juan Antonio Samaranch.

Samaranch served as IOC President from 1980 to 2001, the second longest term in the role behind founder of the Modern Olympic Games Baron Pierre de Coubertin, and is widely credited with making the Olympics the biggest sporting competition on the planet.

"For me, Juan Antonio Samaranch was my mentor and my hero," Fasel explained.

"What he did for the Olympic Movement as IOC President is just unbelievable for one man.

"It really was not easy for Jacques to follow as person like Juan Antonio after all he had done as President.

"But Jacques has done it in a very smart way and he has been his own man.

"He has taken to the role like a surgeon.

"He has been very precise, very thoughtful and very methodical.

"So we are all very thankful to Jacques that he has been able to take the Olympic Movement to the strong position it is in today."

Insidethegames

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I think they would rather pick a summer sport-candidate because that person encompasses everything whereas a "winter sports"- person would just give the appearance of looking out for the interests of only the Winter-participating countries, so just about a 3rd of the NOCs.

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I think they would rather pick a summer sport-candidate because that person encompasses everything whereas a "winter sports"- person would just give the appearance of looking out for the interests of only the Winter-participating countries, so just about a 3rd of the NOCs.

I disagree with that logic. If a former Olympian who competed at the Winter Olympics has the credentials and the backing to be an IOC president, I doubt that the fact that they competed in Lillehammer and not Atlanta would have little bearing on their ability to oversee both versions of the Olympics evenly.

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I disagree with that logic. If a former Olympian who competed at the Winter Olympics has the credentials and the backing to be an IOC president, I doubt that the fact that they competed in Lillehammer and not Atlanta would have little bearing on their ability to oversee both versions of the Olympics evenly.

U have a right to disagree but I think I'm right. I don't think a Winter person has been elected IOC president. Killy is probably the highest any Winter sportsperson has ascended to the IOC ranks.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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U have a right to disagree but I think I'm right. I don't think a Winter person has been elected IOC president. Killy is probably the highest any Winter sportsperson has ascended to the IOC ranks.

I suspect you are right this time, but sooner or later a Winter sports figure will end up president.

I actually have a sneaking suspicion Michelle Kwan may end up in the IOC someday. She's bright. She's diplomatic. She's beloved. She's studied international relations. She participated in the women in sport conference. I'm not making a prediction here, I'm just saying that I can see it working out really well.

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I think it's safe to call this early..

Germany's Thomas Bach will become the next IOC president. And we may all celebrate when this happens.

Hopefully he can inspire a German bid for the summer games.

I think that is what will happen too because Bach and Munich will not be awarded back to back apparently. Though both are favourites if they do bid.

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Well Munich really should bid for 2022 - as they would be in a leading role.

Bach and Ude (the mayor of Munich) always said, that Munich has a very stromg bid and that Munich would bid again if they would loose 2018. They were lying.

The name of the Applicant Cities for 2022 must be at the IOC this autumn. This autumns we have elections in Germany, in Bavaria (Ude is candidate for the Social Democrtas to become Minister of Bavaria) and if ever Bach should be the new IOC president in september, the German NOC wont have time to sort out details of a new Munich bid, as they have to search for a new president.

Because of Bachs and Udes private ambitions, a german bid for 2022 and maybe even 2024 is unlikely.

But I think that Bach might fail in acquiring enough votes for him as an IOC president this year and for a potential german Host within a few years again.

But as Faster said: The race os still open and I think that Bach was shocked in 2011 to see that he was only able to acqirre 25 votes only for a strong Munich Bid. He rxpected more.

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It is too early for a female IOC President, says SportAccord director

March 18 - It is too early for a female International Olympic

Committee (IOC) President, according to Ingrid Beutler, SportAccord's

director of social responsibility and integrity units.

Speaking in response to a question about the potential election of Nawal El

Moutawakel, the IOC vice-president from Morocco, to the top role, she

agreed that it would send out a positive signal about women's position

in sport, however, she explained that the Olympic Movement is not at

that stage just yet.

"It would indeed be a strong signal," Beutler (pictured top) said.

"The doubt I would have at the moment is that it is perhaps too early.

"If we look across our 107 members we only have seven who have a

female President, so we are not there yet."

"I think in the next term she will have a greater chance when there will

be greater movement and more women within leadership positions."

If El Moutawakel, an IOC member since 1998, puts herself forward and

succeeds in replacing incumbent Jacques Rogge, whose 12-year reign ends

at the 125th Session in Buenos Aires in September this year, she would

become the first woman President of the IOC, as well as the first

African to take up the role.

Nevertheless, this would not be the

first time that the 50-year-old made history, as she not only became the

first Muslim women to have ever won a gold medal at the Olympics when

she claimed victory in the 400 metres hurdles at Los Angeles 1984 but

also became the first Moroccan athlete to claim the top podium spot at a

Games.

However, as Beutler rightly points out, the statistics do

not bode well for El Moutawakel, despite the fact the IOC elected its

first member in 1981 when Venezuela's Flor Isava-Fonseca joined before

becoming the first woman to serve on the Executive Board in 1990.

The IOC failed in its policy to secure a 20 per cent target of women

members by 2005, and the policy was still not achieved by June 2012,

with only 20 out of its 106 members being women - an 18.8 per cent

ratio.

Meanwhile, only four per cent of National Olympic

Committees have female Presidents, including Zambia's Miriam Moyo,

Namibia's Agnes Tjongarero, Lesotho's Matlohang Moiloa-Ramoqopo and

Djibouti's Aïcha Garad Ali.

As of March 2013, 21 women are active IOC members out of 101,

about 20 per cent, with four of these being honorary members.

El Moutawakel could find herself facing tough competition for the top spot

in the Olympic Movement, with International Ice Hockey Federation

(IIHF) chief René Fasel, Germany's Thomas Bach, Singapore's Ng Ser

Miang, Puerto Rico's Richard Carrión and Taiwanese President of the

International Boxing Association (AIBA) C K Wu among the other names

likely to put forward themselves to succeed Rogge.

Insidethegames

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I still don't see how it is "too early" for a female president. It doesn't seem like a very constructive comment, on the part of this SportsAccord person.

I think given the fact that the IOC has made efforts to improve the ratio of women in its ranks, that could only boister Nawals as candidate. That, and aside from her gender, shes probably the best outcome for the Olympic movement, along with Bach.

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Perhaps it's reverse psychology? Maybe they're aiming to goad the IOC into proving how forward-thinking they are. Mind you, I don't see a female IOC president as being particularly progressive. Pick the best person, man or woman, for the job. Nawal is poised, direct, communicates well and understands the IOC well. I've always thought she would be a great choice. I'd be FAR more excited about her than Bach.

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There isn't enough women in top positions across the board at the IOC and IF's. There needs to be progress there before a women heads the IOC.

To me, that is not a reason to claim that it is too soon for a female head of the IOC. Arguably, Nawal is frontrunner with Bach - I don't see how she is written off out of the equation due to gender imbalance across the board. She is there in her own right, just as Bach is. It wouldn't be fair to dismiss her chances because of external factors, like it wouldn't be fair to dismiss Bachs simply due to the gender of his opponent.

My point is, her gender really shouldn't be an issue. Nawal, as a person, is there in her own right and should be judged on her capabilities and competence to serve the Olympic community - which I believe she would do a stellar job at.

Edited by runningrings
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To me, that is not a reason to claim that it is too soon for a female head of the IOC. Arguably, Nawal is frontrunner with Bach - I don't see how she is written off out of the equation due to gender imbalance across the board. She is there in her own right, just as Bach is. It wouldn't be fair to dismiss her chances because of external factors, like it wouldn't be fair to dismiss Bachs simply due to the gender of his opponent.

My point is, her gender really shouldn't be an issue. Nawal, as a person, is there in her own right and should be judged on her capabilities and competence to serve the Olympic community - which I believe she would do a stellar job at.

I am not writing her off. I am just saying it might be too soon for a women to head the IOC. With a predominant male voting bloc I just don't see it happening now maybe in the future when the next race starts sometime in the 20's

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I am not writing her off. I am just saying it might be too soon for a women to head the IOC. With a predominant male voting bloc I just don't see it happening now maybe in the future when the next race starts sometime in the 20's

This dismisses the idea that male IOC members are capable of putting aside gender in their voting. What about the sizeable bloc of women that may vote for Nawal - on top of the other members from the African bloc, Muslim bloc, etc.. that would give her support. See as she ticks many minority boxes, she might have several bases of support - on top of the desire to perhaps see a non-European hold the post.

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