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Athletics (Track and Field) at the 2012 Summer Olympics

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Well, no offense, but you really cannot celebrate a gold medal won on a laboratory over the track. Good that the cheat got caught though. It's also a damn but inevitable shame that London lost its clean record for medalists during the Games.

I disagree. The event was won on the track, but it took a lab to find a cheater. Valeri was the winner amongs the clean athletes, so she deserves to celebrate.

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I got the news at work (while I was still tired from last night's long TV session, due to the closing ceremony). It's good that they caught her, but at the same time it's sad that after the Games ended on such a high note last night, they get tarnished in a way just one day later.

However, it was obvious to me that not all medallists have won cleanly and honestly, and I'm certain that there are still lots of drug cheats out there among the athletes and medallists of these Games, whether they will ever be caught or not. Kazakhstan's success with its surprising 7 gold medals appears fishy to me, too. The same applies to the weightlifting, which is always a sport with a high doping risk. And I got suspicious about Ostapchuk's manly looks already when she won the gold medal, also due to the reports that the other shot putters rather distanced themselves from her during the competition.

In fact, it would have been better if they had uncovered this still during the Games. It would have been a good reminder for everyone that one should never get too crazy about the athletes, even not when they are surrounded by all that Olympic glory.

I disagree. The event was won on the track, but it took a lab to find a cheater. Valeri was the winner amongs the clean athletes, so she deserves to celebrate.

Who can say for certain that all the other athletes were clean? Just saying...

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Funny you mention Kazakhstan since some of ther gold medalist were Russians that couldn't even get past Russia's doping controls.

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Its a dangerous game (and a tad grotesque) to question a countrys performance on nothing more than hear'say or suspicion. Kazakhstan, performed well in London, until someone has proof to the contrary.

Edited by Michelle

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Man this sort of ruins the buzz...Great that Valerie is the rightfull champion...You know there was always something about that Belirussian...

I hope this doesn't ruin what has been a great games.

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He can say what he likes...

This sort of makes me happy for our 'peoples champion' Valerie, but angry at having her robbed of her rightful Olympic moment in the sun.

Once again we are left with the eastern bloc countries under suspicion. You have to look at Kazakstan as an example of possible cheating.

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He can say what he likes...

This sort of makes me happy for our 'peoples champion' Valerie, but angry at having her robbed of her rightful Olympic moment in the sun.

Once again we are left with the eastern bloc countries under suspicion. You have to look at Kazakstan as an example of possible cheating.

Yes it is really sad that her moment was lost and the Belarussian competitor took that away from her.

Anyway I don't think it will detract from what has been a wonderful Olympic Games!

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While it is hugely disappointing for Valerie in the fact it took away her moment as defending her gold medal and celebrating on the night, there are positives.

The fact that she was caught so soon after the event and the rightful champion was declared and also that there were athletes caught. I have no doubt there would be a number of athletes who are using PES, the more that are caught the better.

Well done valer on winning back to back Olympic gold medals.

I can't believe that takes nz to only 1 behind aus on the gold medal tally! What a great result for them.

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Chinese outrage over 'scripted' Olympic commentary on star hurdler

120808034728-olympics-china-liu-xiang-story-top.jpg

Beijing (CNN) -- A bold headline on the front page of a Chinese newspaper Thursday screamed: "Liu Xiang knew, CCTV knew and leaders knew --only spectators foolishly waited to witness moment of miracle."

The headline in the Oriental Guardian -- a local newspaper based in the eastern city of Nanjing -- referred to a star athlete who had caught the Chinese public's imagination after injuring himself at the recent Olympic Games.

Liu Xiang, a world champion in the men's 110-meter hurdles and one of the country's most famous sportsmen, pulled his Achilles tendon while taking off and crashed into the first hurdle during his first-round heat in London's Olympic stadium. He then hopped the full stretch on his left foot, pausing to kiss the final hurdle, before leaving the track in a wheelchair.

The high-profile withdrawal became a glaring moment of disappointment in an otherwise glorious run for China, which won 88 medals in London, trailing only the United States in the final medal table. Hosts and reporters at state-run China Central Television (CCTV), which carried the event live, turned noticeably emotional as Liu fell. Yang Jian, lead anchor for the hurdles race, sounded shaken and at times choked up during the coverage.

Ye Shiwen strikes gold again

"This is the reality -- this is the cruelty of competitive sports," Yang was heard saying on air. "Liu Xiang is like a soldier -- when he realized he couldn't reach the finish line, he rose above himself."

Then came the claims that prompted critics to blast CCTV's coverage of the saga.

Local media reported that, in a largely self-congratulatory meeting Wednesday reviewing its Olympics coverage, CCTV officials revealed they were aware of Liu's "serious injury" before the race and approved four scripts for the anchors -- including the so-called "choked up" option apparently used on air. The story was widely reported by news outlets across China and featured prominently on major web portals through most of Thursday

CCTV has no public relations department to respond to questions about its coverage, but sources at CCTV confirmed to CNN that an Olympic coverage meeting did take place. However, they declined to comment on what was discussed -- and asked that their names not be used -- because of the sensitive nature of the matter. By Thursday night, Chinese news articles on the meeting mostly disappeared online and some links to the original stories on social media sites appeared dead.

Meanwhile CCTV broke its silence late Thursday night, reporting that Liu had stitches from his August 9 ankle surgery in London removed in Shanghai earlier that day. The 29-year-old hurdler defended his actions at the Olympics, insisting he felt healthy before the starting pistol fired.

"When I lost my balance at the first hurdle, I felt my foot was whipped by someone and then I fell," he recalled. "I didn't know what was going on and just felt a lot of pain. I was sitting on the ground in pain and felt totally blank."

"When a stadium worker pushed out a wheelchair, I saw it and didn't want to sit in it," he added. "So I hopped to the finish line. When I passed the final hurdle, this thought just popped up in my mind and I wanted to kiss that hurdle."

Despite government censors' best effort to keep Liu's story positive after the event, many people had been questioning the reasons behind Liu's decision to participate if, indeed, the severity of his injury was known.

On Sina Weibo, China's equivalent of Twitter, users posted more than 38 million messages on the subject by Thursday afternoon. Most recent posts appeared critical of Liu -- "feeling cheated" was among the most commonly cited reactions.

On Netease, a major web portal, users seemed to be equally unforgiving. Many demanded an apology from Liu, while others called CCTV shameless for "co-starring with him in a world-class farce." One of the most reposted comments read: "A group of con men spend taxpayers' money and cheat on everyone's feelings so that they can make more money for themselves - what kind of world is this?"

...

Not all supporters have abandoned Liu, though. Echoing online sentiment that Liu is a victim of the system, some analysts say the hurdler should not be blamed.

"Liu Xiang's team and the Chinese sports authority should take the blame," said Guan Jun, a columnist for the Chinese edition of Sports Illustrated. "They operate with taxpayers' money -- so they have the responsibility to clarify to the public and explain why they concealed the truth."

http://www.cnn.com/2...cctv/index.html

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Liu was the Chinese only hope at a medal in the track and field outside of the hammer throw and race walk events. If China wants to finish at the very top of the medals table in Rio, they need to rapidly strengthen track and field.

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The chances of the Chinese stepping up track and field are about as high as the chances of me taking up power lifting. Dahling, I DON'T lift.

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Massive upset tonight as Pistorius came 2nd.

However the big talking point will be his comments directly after the race where he questioned the rules and the fairness of the length of gold medal winner Alan Oliveira's (Brazil) blades.

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Massive upset tonight as Pistorius came 2nd.

However the big talking point will be his comments directly after the race where he questioned the rules and the fairness of the length of gold medal winner Alan Oliveira's (Brazil) blades.

Sounds like a sore loser to me. Shame.

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I'm a little disappointed on Pistorius... He managed to turn a silver medal he's won in a gold medal he's lost. :mellow:

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alan1.jpg

Sometimes you win, sometimes you don't. This is sport, Pistorius.

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Pistorius made a formal protest to the IPC against the length of blades used by Alan Fonteles (BRA) and Blake Leeper (USA), gold and bronze medalists respectively. On their official website, the IPC “agreed to meet with him at a later date so that he could raise his questions in a formal environment away from the emotion of the stadium."

http://www.paralympic.org/news/ipc-media-statement-men-s-200m-t44

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Why the Pistorius story matters

David Bond

Whenever a big name in sport loses and then criticises the athlete who beat him or her as well as the rules governing the competition, it makes for a great story.

But there are three reasons why the Oscar Pistorius story matters:

1. He is the poster boy of Paralympic sport.

There are only a very small number of athletes who have such a high profile in an event many people are coming to for the first time. Think Usain Bolt false starting in the World Championships in Daegu last year and you get an idea of how big this story is. For Pistorius to lose is a shock. For the South African to then call into question the fundamentals of the competition is another matter altogether.

2. It gets to the heart of the Paralympics' delicate relationship with technology and classification.

Of course, in able-bodied sport - for want of a better phrase - the competitors come in all shapes and sizes. But when running blades and wheelchairs are brought into play, then the rules governing the various pieces of kit become central to everything. As does classification. It is interesting to hear the International Paralympic Committee talking about reviewing not only its rules for running blades but also tightening up the programme for the 2016 Games in Rio so that athletes like Pistorius, who is a double amputee (T44), does not compete with athletes who are single amputees (T43).

3. Finally, it exposes the tensions between the Olympics and Paralympics.

We would not be talking about the Pistorius row if he had not broken new ground by competing against able-bodied athletes in the Olympics. Some people believe the science of prosthetics is moving so fast that very soon athletes in the Paralympics will be going faster, higher and stronger than their Olympic counterparts. That might seem a bit too Hollywood at this stage but it poses a difficult question for the Paralympic movement, which relies so heavily on its close relationship with the International Olympic Committee (IOC). Will athletes like Pistorius in future aspire to test themselves against Olympians? Or will the profile of the Paralympics and the opportunities it offers be too alluring? Will world governing bodies like the IOC or the IAAF, which rules athletics, have to rethink the way they integrate with disabled sport? And should it all be moving towards one Olympic Games?

In losing to emerging star Alan Oliveira, Pistorius may have lost some of his superhuman aura. But it may also turn out to be a seminal moment for the Paralympics.

BBC

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A Prima donna on the rise.

Honestly, I'm not sure that's fair. Every time I've ever heard Pistorious interviewed he sounded grounded and gracious. I would like to understand more before dismissing him as a whiner or a sore loser.

I hope it is resolved with clarity.

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Honestly, I'm not sure that's fair. Every time I've ever heard Pistorious interviewed he sounded grounded and gracious. I would like to understand more before dismissing him as a whiner or a sore loser.

I hope it is resolved with clarity.

I got that impression too, but who knows what a person is really like until they are pushed into exhibiting certain behavior. It is interesting though, since his participation in the Olympics brought up the issue of "fairness", and you would think that he would have been a bit more sensitive to throw that out there at someone else.

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