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Empty Seats!


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I think this will be not a huge problem in Rio...

I think all Brazil will pack to Rio to watch the games (specially with so low-price airline ticket we are getting lately here in BR - even without any clearence).

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I think this will be not a huge problem in Rio...

I think all Brazil will pack to Rio to watch the games (specially with so low-price airline ticket we are getting lately here in BR - even without any clearence).

You don't understand the situation. There are plenty of people who wanted to buy these tickets. There's no lack of desire to see the Games. The IOC withheld the tickets in case the "Olympic family" wanted to use them. Then they let the tickets go to waste and didn't notify anyone so the seats remain empty even though there are tons of people who want them.

If the IOC did this to London, they can do it to Rio. I

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Exactly, you've completely misunderstood this Danny. These tickets weren't even on sale to the public, they were reserved for officials, the IOC, athlete delegations etc. And the quantity of those tickets is determined by the IOC, not the local organisiers. If the IOC doesn't change things it will be EXACTLY the same in Rio. They ought to change things before then, but then they ought to have done so after Beijing but they obviously didn't.

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It felt really strange the other day to hear a Conservative MP saying how angry she was and she had herself tried and failed to get any tickets for any of the gymnastics events only to see empty seats. Same story for ordinary people all over UK. Danny, here in the UK when we won the bid we never had a doubt that we could fill the seats at all. If it doesn't change, as Rob says, it could also happen in Rio. The IOC needs to change its process here and solve this problem. Thankfully even with a quite a few empty seats at some venues, the atmosphere has been there.

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I wonder if they even want to be there or if they were drafted. The uniforms do make it very obvious.

They seemed to be enjoying themselves yesterday, but then again they were watching the women :rolleyes: It almost seemed pervy to me yesterday, but I think they enjoyed it tonight too. They got to see a bit of history in British sport with our first men's team medal in gymnastics for a century.

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Supposedly some Chinese spectators four years ago bought tickets as souvenirs, knowing they wouldn't be able to make the session as they'd be somewhere else. The Games meant that much to them.

Could the same thing be happening in London?

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Supposedly some Chinese spectators four years ago bought tickets as souvenirs, knowing they wouldn't be able to make the session as they'd be somewhere else. The Games meant that much to them.

Could the same thing be happening in London?

No Brit spends money on a sporting event just to keep the tickets as a souvenir let alone a home olympics. In fact I saw an article today where an Australian couple had ome over to London with tickets that turned out to be fake. A Brit GAVE them his spare tickets so that they could still go. Sport means too much to us to let seats go spare!

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We attended a basketball session and due to a problem with our tickets were moved closer to the front, which we obviously didn't complain about and we found ourselves in the Sponsor section, facing the IOC area and media desks.

You will see how much space is actually used and wasted by both of these.

Sadly though, although we felt lucky enough to get tickets through the regular ticket ballot website, the people in the sponsor areas just weren't as happy or committed to the event. They came and went in large groups, leaving massive blocks of empty seating.

If you don't pay for something, it is likely that you won't value it as much as someone who has used hard earned private cash to pay for it.

size-olympics.jpg

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Supposedly some Chinese spectators four years ago bought tickets as souvenirs, knowing they wouldn't be able to make the session as they'd be somewhere else. The Games meant that much to them.

Could the same thing be happening in London?

I call BS on this. Most Chinese who won or bought tickets they wouldn't or couldn't use, resold them onward.

At any rate, that's not the reason for the empty seats, or at least wouldn't account for more than a scattered oddball seat or two amongst the larger area allotted for the General Publivc. People need to understand that the stands are "zoned" and divided into areas for the General Public, Athletes (watching not competing), the IOC Family (usually the NOC officials are in here also, AFAIK), and the Media which have special technology-equipped desk areas pre-set and purpose-built. Corporate Sponsor tickets seem to be mostly mixed in with seating on the General Public side (scattered throughout the GP, not in a clump). Although some of the corporate tickets for some events may be on the IOC/Media/Athlete side, depending on venue.

IMO, the IOC has been content to let Corporate Sponsors take the rap for unused tickets and empty seats, when they've been leading the parade in waste..and for longer than London 2012. I'm sure the IOC takes tickets "off the top" and dictates to the Organizing Committees how many tickets they MUST and WILL have per event--not the other way around. What's interesting is why no organizing committee member from any Olympics has ever come out and stated this.

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I call BS on this. Most Chinese who won or bought tickets they wouldn't or couldn't use, resold them onward.

At any rate, that's not the reason for the empty seats, or at least wouldn't account for more than a scattered oddball seat or two amongst the larger area allotted for the General Publivc. People need to understand that the stands are "zoned" and divided into areas for the General Public, Athletes (watching not competing), the IOC Family (usually the NOC officials are in here also, AFAIK), and the Media which have special technology-equipped desk areas pre-set and purpose-built. Corporate Sponsor tickets seem to be mostly mixed in with seating on the General Public side (scattered throughout the GP, not in a clump). Although some of the corporate tickets for some events may be on the IOC/Media/Athlete side, depending on venue.

IMO, the IOC has been content to let Corporate Sponsors take the rap for unused tickets and empty seats, when they've been leading the parade in waste..and for longer than London 2012. I'm sure the IOC takes tickets "off the top" and dictates to the Organizing Committees how many tickets they MUST and WILL have per event--not the other way around. What's interesting is why no organizing committee member from any Olympics has ever come out and stated this.

Vancouver was very clear that any 'Olympic Family' tickets not needed where to be returned and resold. They were and there were large amounts of tickets rotating through sales until Game-time.

And after being on a Vancouver to Toronto flight with almost a 100 people decked out in Coke sh!t, there is no way I will believe it is the sponsor tickets that are the issue. The sponsors pay for those tickets and then give them as rewards to senior staff, managers, and general employees as bonuses and the like. The sponsors and the employees that get those tickets are not going to waste them.

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I call BS on this. Most Chinese who won or bought tickets they wouldn't or couldn't use, resold them onward.

Thanks for clearing that up. I had always heard that about Beijing and although ridicioulous, I didn't put it past the Chinese.

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Oh please. This happens *every* Olympics. Yes, including Vancouver. It's not as noticable at the outdoor winter events, but there were obvious open sections at both the short-track and pairs events I was at.

As I said, it happens every Olympics. Any IOC/LOCOG member who claims to be surprised or outraged is full of it. They knew this would happen... but aren't willing to upset the press and "Olympic families" to do something about it. They'll just accept the bad press as the price to pay.

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I haven't seen any news about empty chairs.

Is the problem mostly sorted now - obviously a venue will never be 100% full but I haven't seen any gaps of empty seats.

Football is horrible and for Tennis there were a lot of empty seats, too, but apart from that, it's fully ok. Having EVERY seat filled will never happen.

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Tennis has eight hour passes. When I was in Court No 1 last Monday it was jam packed for Serena but half empty for Isner afterwards as loads of people (including me) went out for the loo and something to eat.

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Football is horrible and for Tennis there were a lot of empty seats, too, but apart from that, it's fully ok. Having EVERY seat filled will never happen.

Well I'm happy if it's only Football and Tennis.

The ultimate goal for Football is the World Cup and for Tennis, Wimbledon - hence the Olympics not proving a must-watch for those two.

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The problem is that there's always going to be provision made for the IOC and they are rarely going to fill that provision except at the most popular events; and since some of those can change depending on earlier results, it's tough to plan for.

My suggestion is to actually plan for it and create a volunteer role which is 'seat filler' almost as they do at the Oscars to sit at tables when the rightful occupant nips to the loo. Your volunteer role is to fill a seat in the IOC section and if a member of the IOC wants to sit in it, you leave. If they used that method of filling even 50% of the IOC seats, it would create a better impression on TV.

It has got a lot better; the IOC sections have been less obvious at my more recent events aside from the obvious rows of troops! And I'm impressed by the turnout of the great British public; most venues are staying pretty full until 11ish even when there's no home interest.

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